Israel’s Kings And Conflicts – 2 Kings

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Part 1. Introduction.

I. Video Information. 1-2 Kings -This video will provide a quick overview of the first and second books of Kings. Its video details can be found at the bottom of this page.

II. Lesson Overview.

A. The author of 2 Kings was Jeremiah. The date of the writing was ca., 550 b.c.

B. The timeline for this study will be from 971 B.C. until 586 B.C., (Ryrie Study Bible, Copyright 1986). The outline of 2 Kings is taken from the same Ryrie Study Bible.

C. Timeline of key events of 2 Kings: 931 B.C., Jeroboam becomes king of Israel (Northern Kingdom). 930 B.C., The Kingdom is divided. 848 B.C., Elisha begins prophetic ministry. 841 B.C., Jehu becomes king of Israel. 840 B.C., Obadiah begins prophetic ministry. 835 B.C., Joel begins prophetic ministry. 835 B.C., Joash becomes king of Judah. 789 B.C., Jeroboam II becomes king of Israel. 755 B.C., Amos begins prophetic ministry. 753 B.C., Hosea begins prophetic ministry. 742 B.C., Micah begins prophetic ministry. 740 B.C., Isaiah begins prophetic ministry. 727 B.C., Hezekiah becomes king of Judah. 722 B.C., Sargon II of Assyria conquers Israel. 640 B.C., Josiah becomes king of Judah. 627 B.C., Jeremiah begins prophetic ministry. 586 B.C., Nebuchadnezzar of Babylon conquers Judah.

D. The history of Israel and Judah, that we have been studying, picks up in this Second Book of Kings and concludes at the end of 2 Kings. We will take another look at God’s chosen people in the following study of the books of First and Second Chronicles.

E. Picking up after the deaths of Ahab and Jehoshaphat, 2 Kings wraps up the life of Elijah and records the increasing moral and religious decline of both the northern and southern kingdom until Judah’s exile to Babylon in 586 BC. First and 2 Kings are a sobering historical illustration of the dire consequences for human sinfulness (Olive Tree Bible Overview).

III. Key Prophetic Events of 2 Kings. This study of Israel is prophecy based, as opposed to a verse by verse study. The destruction of the Northern Kingdom (Israel) is mentioned very heavily, as is the destruction of the Southern Kingdom (Judah). The many detailed notes of Dr. Ryrie are important for any student of the Bible to understand, and to explain to others. The following events of 2 Kings are discussed in greater detail in the Lesson Outline, where other events are also examined.

A. 2:11. The “rapture, the catching up.”In 2:11, Elihah the prophet was taken to heaven without dying. The verse says, “he went up by a whirlwind to heaven.” Strong’s Concordance shows the meaning of “went” (5927: to go up, ascend, climb). https://biblehub.com/lexicon/2_kings/2-11.htm Dr. Ryrie’s note shows an OT parallel event in Gen 5:22-24, where vs 22 says, “Enoch walked with God.” vs 24 says “God took him.” Strong’s Concordance shows the meaning of “took” (3947: to take). In the NT, John 14:2, 3, 6, Christ will come in the air, not to stand on the earth, and take His believers back to heaven with Him. In 1 Thes 4:17, we are told that we will be caught up to meet the Lord in the air. In John 14:3, “Christ says, I will come.” Strong’s says “2064: to come, go.” In John 14:6, the word “comes” has the same Greek Strong’s number and meaning. In 1 Thes 4:17, the words, we will be caught up together, have the Strong’s meaning, “726: to seize, catch up, snatch away; 260: at once.” The rapture, or catching up of the church in the NT, has the same meaning of Enoch and Elijah being caught up in the OT. This will also be the experience of believers living at the time of Christ’s return in he air (1 Cor 15:51-54, 1 Thes 4:17). This event, called the rapture of the church or the catching up of the church, takes place when Christ returns to earth in the air, but does not set food on the earth. The time that Christ will set foot on the earth will take place at the end of the tribulation (Zech 14:1-4), and is the event which is known as the second coming of Christ.

B. 15:27-31. “Tiglath-pileser (III) of Assyria attacked northern Israel about 733 B.C., conquering it in 722 B.C. and ending the history of the Northern Kingdom of Israel.

C. 17:1-6. The defeat of Israel (Northern Kingdom). 17:3. “Shalmaneser.” Shalmaneser V, son of and successor of Tiglath-Pileser III, reigned from 727-722 B.C. 17:4. “So King of Egypt. Osorkon IV (about 727-716 B.C.). 17:6. The king of Assyria. I.e., Shalmaneser, though Sargon II (722-705 B.C.) takes credit in his annals for the actual conquest of Samaria. Perhaps they were both involved, Shalmaneser as the king and Sargon as the general.

D. 17:7-23. The sin of Israel. 17:24-41. The resettlement of Israel. 17:24. The fall of Samaria/Israel. After the fall of Samaria, it was repopulated with people from “Cuthah” (in Babylon), “Avva” (on the Orontes River), “Hamath”(between Aleppo and Damascus), and “Sepharvaim” (possibly on the border between Damascus and Hamath). These people, by intermarriage with those left in Israel, began the new mongrel race known as the Samaritans. The Samaritans were descendants of colonists whom the Assyrian kings planted in Palestine after the fall of the Northern Kingdom in 722 B.C. They were despised by the Jews because of their mixed Gentile blood and their different worship, which centered at Mount Gerizim (John 4:20-22). Luke 10 relates to “the good Samaritan, vs 33. The name, “Palestine,” is a word that has been applied to the Northern Kingdom, but has no scriptural validity. The KJV, in Joel 3:4 uses the word, “Palestine.” The NASB, in the same verse uses the word, “Philistia,” as does the NKJV, and refers to the Philistines. Based on Scripture, those whom say that they are Palestinians, are actually descendants of the Philistines (See Judges 16, re: Samson and Delilah.).

E. 18:1. “Hezekiah.” He was one of Judah’s best kings, pursuing an anti-Assyrian policy, which brought about a campaign against Judah by Sennacherib. 18:7. Sometime after Sennacherib replaced Sargon II as king of Assyria in 705 B.C., the Assyrian invasion occurred. 18:9. The contrast is startling: under Hezekiah, Judah was being led back to God at the same time that Israel, under Hoshea, was being taken in captivity. 18:13. In 701 B.C. “Sennacherib” captured the cities of Judah (46 according to his annals) except Jerusalem. Jerusalem would not fall to the Assyrians (vs 32-34). Sennacherib was God’s servant as God’s instrument. 19:35-36. “Then it happened that night that the angel of the LORD went out and struck 185,000 in the camp of the Assyrians; and when men arose early in the morning behold, all of them were dead.” The Lord used a sudden particularly virulent plague to slay the Assyrian army. Herodotus records that the army camp was infected with mice (or rats).

F. 21:1 Manasseh. He was Judah’s worst and longest reigning King. 21:6. “He made his son pass through the fire” (concerning human sacrifice). Jerusalem would be judged according to the same righteousness standard as were Samaria and Ahab, and as a result would be destroyed. 21:16. According to tradition, Manasseh killed Isaiah (Isaiah was martyred by being sawed in two inside of a hollow log).

G. 23:29. Josiah’s reign (640-609 B.C.). “Pharoah Neco king of Egypt (609-594) went up to the king of Assyria to help him against Nabopolassar, king of Babylon.

H. 23:35. Jehoiakim (Eliakim). 23:35. “Jehoiakim” became a vassal to Egypt for four years, exacting the tribute from all the people.
24:1. After the battle of Carchemish in 605 B.C. (which ended the rule of Egypt), Nebuchadnezzar entered Jerusalem, made Jehoiakim a vassal, and took Daniel and others to Babylon.

I. 24:10. Jehoiachin. The second invasion of Jerusalem by Nebuchadnezzar, in 597 B.C., stripping the Temple of its treasures.

J. 24:17. Zedekiah (Mattaniah). Rebellion against Babylon and destruction of the Temple. 25:1. The final siege of Jerusalem began in January 588 B.C. and lasted a year and a half. 25:4. The city was broken into on July 16, 586 B.C. 25:7. Third deportation to Babylon.

Part 2. Supportive Information. Scofield Reference Notes. Bio can be found in the About Sources page of this site.

I. Book Overview – 2 Kings – by C.I. Scofield

A. Book Introduction – 2 Kings

This book continues the history of the kingdoms to the captivities. It includes the translation of Elijah and the ministry of Elisha. During this period Amos and Hosea prophesied in Israel, and Obadiah, Joel, Isaiah, Micah, Nahum, Habakkuk, Zephaniah, and Jeremiah in Judah.

B. Second Kings is in seven parts:

1. The last ministry and translation of Elijah, 2 Kings 1:1 to 2 Kings 2:11.

2. The ministry of Elisha from the translation of Elijah to the anointing of Jehu, 2 Kings 2:12 to 2 Kings 9:10.

3. The reign of Jehu over Israel, 2 Kings 9:11 to 2 Kings 10:36.

4. The reigns of Athaliah and Jehoash over Judah, 2 Kings 11:1 to 2 Kings 12:21.

5. The reigns of Jehoahaz and Joash over Israel, and the last ministry of Elisha, 2 Kings 13:1-25.

6. From the death of Elisha to the captivity of Israel, 2 Kings 14:1 to 2 Kings 17:41.

7. From the accession of Hezekiah to the captivity of Judah, 2 Kings 18:1 to 2 Kings 25:30.

The events recorded in Second Kings cover a period of 308 years. (Ussher)

Part 3. Lesson Outline.

I. The Divided Kingdom. 1:1-17:41.

A. The reign of Ahaziah in Israel (853-852 B.C.), 1:1-18.
1. 1:3. “the angel of the Lord.” See notes on Gen 16:9. A theophany, a self-manifestation of God. He here speaks with God, identifies himself with God, and claims to exercise the prerogatives of God. Because the angel of the Lord ceases to appear after the coronation (the triumphal entry of Christ into Jerusalem), it is often inferred that the angel in the OT is a pre-incarnate appearance of the second person of the trinity.
2. 1:9. “man of God.” A synonym for “prophet” in the books of Kings (cf. 1 Kings 12:22: 17:18; 2 Kings 4:7, etc.)

B. The reign of Jehoram (Joram) in Israel (852-841 B.C.), 2:1-8:15.
1. The translation o Elijah, 2:1-11.
a. 2:11. Elihah, like Enoch (See Gen 5:22-24), was taken to heaven without dying. This will also be the experience of believers living at the time of Christ’s return (1 Cor 15:51, 1 Thes 4:17). My note: this event, called the rapture of the church, or the catching up of the church, takes place when Christ returns to earth in the air, but does not set food on the earth. The time that Christ will set foot on the earth will take place at the end of the tribulation (Zech 14:1-4), and is the event which is known as the second coming of Christ.
2. The beginning of Elisha’s ministry, 2:12-25.
3. Jehoram’s expedition against Moab, 3:1-27.
a. 3:1. The double dating of the accession of “Jehoram” (cf.1:17) indicates a coregency with Jehoshaphat in Judah. Jehoram reigned from 852 to 841 B.C.
b. 3:2. “his mother.” Jezebel, who lived throughout his entire reign (9:30).
4. Elisha’s ministry, 4:1-8:15.
a. Elisha aids a widow, 4:1-7.
b. Elisha and the Shunammite woman, 4:8-37.
c. Elisha at Gilgal, 4:38-44.
d. Elisha and Naaman the the leper, 5:1-27.
e. Elisha recovers the axe head, 6:1-7.
f. Elisha thwarts Aram, 6:8-8:6.
g. Elisha in Damascus, 8:7-15.

C. The reign of Joram (Jehoram) in Judah (848-841 B.C.; 2 Chron 21:1-20), 8:16-24.

D. The reign of Ahaziah in Judah (841 B.C.; 2 Chron 22:1-9), 8:25-29.

E. The reign of Jehu in Israel (841-814 B.C.), 9:1-10:36.
1. Jehu anointed by Elisha, 9:1-10.
a. 9:8. “For the whole house of Ahab will perish” (NASB).
b. 9:10. “The dogs shall eat Jezebel in the territory of Jezreel, and none shall burn her” (NASB). Concerning Jezebel’s fate, see verses 35-37 and 1 Kings 21:23.
2. Jehu defeats Jehoram (Joram) of Israel, 9:11-10:17.
3. Jehu destroys Baal worshipers, 10:18-36.
a. 10:29. Though Jehu destroyed Baal worship, he did not eradicate the idolatry of Jehoram (see notes on 1 Kings 12:28,29) nor walk in the law of God (v. 31).
b. 10:36. Jehu reigned over Israel in Samaria for 28 years.

F. The reign of Athaliah in Judah (841-835 B.C.; 2 Chron 22:10-23:15), 11:1-16.
a. 11:1. The story of Ahazia is resumed from 9:27. Athaliah was the daughter of Ahab and Jezebel, and he wife of Jehoram.
b. 11:2. Athaliah’s attempt to exterminate all rivals to the throne was thwarted by the hiding of Joash (=Jehoash of v.21) in the “bedroom” (a room where mattresses and couches were stored).
c. 11:12. “the testimony.” Probably a copy of the Mosaiac Law to remind the king of his obligations.
d. 11:12. “anointed.” On the significance of anointing, see note on 1 Sam 9:16. Anointing involved a consecration, or setting apart, for service. It was a religious act that established a special relationship between God and the king, who served as His representative and ruler over the people.
e. 11:16. Athaliah was put to death.

G. The reign of Jehoash (Joash) in Judah (835-796 B.C.; 2 Chron 23:16-24:27); 11:17-12:21).

H. The reign of Jehoahaz in Israel (814-798 B.C.), 13:1-9.

I. The reign of Jehoash (Joash) in Israel (798-782 B.C.), 13:10-25.

J. The reign of Amaziah in Judah (796-767 B.C.; 2 Chron 25:1-28), 14:1-22.

K. The reign of Jeroboam II in Israel (794-753 B.C.), 14:23-29).

L. The reign of Azariah (Uzziah) in Judah (790-739 B.C.; 2 Chron 26:1-23), 15:1-7.

M. The reign of Zechariah in Israel (753 B.C.), 15:8-12.

N. The reign of Shallum in Israel (752 B.C.) 15:13-15.

O. The reign of Menahem in Israel (752-742 B.C.), 15:16-22.
1. 15:19-20. “Pul,” Tiglath-{Pileser III (745-727 B.C.; 1 Chron 5:26) a general who took the reins of the Assyrian government and made its army into an efficient military machine. “a thousand talents” = 3,000,000 shekels. Therefore, about 60,000 men contributed to this levy.

P. The reign of Pekahiah in Israel (742-740 B.C.), 15:23-26.

Q. The reign of Pekah in Israel (752-732 B.C.), 15:27-31.
1. 15:27-31. A year after “Pekah” began to reign, Uzziah, king of Judah died as a leper, and Isaiah saw the great vision in Isa 6. Because Judah refused to join an anti-Assyrian alliance with Israel, she was successfully invaded by Israel (2 Chron 28:5-15). A second invasion a few months later was not successful because “Tiglath-pileser (III) of Assyria attacked northern Israel about 733 B.C. (v. 29; Isa 7), thus marking the beginning of the end for the Northern Kingdom. “Hoshea,” a puppet king and the last king of Israel, attempted an alliance with Egypt and was imprisoned by the Assyrians, who besieged Samaria, the capital, conquering it in 722 B.C. and ending the history of the Northern Kingdom of Israel.

R. The reign of Jotham in Judah (750-731 B.C.; 2 Chron 27:1-9), 15:32-38.

S. The reign of Ahaz in Judah (731-715 B.C.; 2 Chron 28:1-27), 16:1-20.

T. The reign of Hoshea in Israel (732-722 B.C.), 17:1-41.
1. The defeat of Israel, 17:1-6. (My note. Israel is the Northern Kingdom, in this context.)
a. 17:3. “Shalmaneser.” Shalmaneser V, son of and successor of Tiglath-Pileser III, reigned from 727-722 B.C.
b. 17:4. “So King of Egypt. Osorkon IV (about 727-716 B.C.). On this conspiracy, see notes on 15:27.
c. 17:6. The king of Assyria. I.e., Shalmaneser, though Sargon II (722-705 B.C., Isa 20:1) takes credit in his annals for the actual conquest of Samaria. Perhaps they were both involved, Shalmaneser as the king and Sargon as the general (See note 18:10, “they”). “Halah.” An unidentified city or district in Mesopotamia. “Habor.” The modern Khabur River, one of the tributares of the upper Euphrates, the area of Gozan (=Guzzani in Assyrian records).
2. The sin of Israel. 17:7-23.
3. The resettlement of Israel. 17:24-41.
a. 17:24. After the fall of Samaria, it was repopulated with people from “Cuthah” (in Babylon), “Avva” (on the Orontes River), “Hamath”(between Aleppo and Damascus), and “Sepharvaim” (possibly on the border between Damascus and Hamath). These people, by intermarriage with those left in Israel, began the new mongrel race known as the Samaritans. See note on Luke 10:33. “Samaritan.” The Samaritans were descendants of colonists whom the Assyrian kings planted in Palestine after the fall of the Northern Kingdom in 722 B.C. They were despised by the Jews because of their mixed Gentile blood and their different worship, which centered at Mount Gerizim (John 4:20-22). My note. The Luke 10 account relates to “the good Samaritan vs 33. The name, “Palestine,” is a word that has been applied to the Northern Kingdom, but has no scriptural validity. The KJV, in Joel 3:4 uses the word, “Palestine.” The NASB, in the same verse uses the word, “Philistia,” as does the NKJV, which refers to the Philistines (Ryrie note). Based on the Scripture, those whom say that they are Palestinians, are actually descendants of the Philistines (See Judges 16, re: Samson and Delilah.).

II. The Surviving Kingdom Of Judah, 18:1-25:30.

A. The reign of Hezekiah (715-686 B.C.; 2 Chron 29:1-32:33), 18:1-20:21.
1. His reforms (18:1-2).
a. 18:1. “Hezekiah” was one of Judah’s best kings, pursuing an anti-Assyrian policy, which brought about a campaign against Judah by Sennacherib.
b. 18:7. “rebelled” sometime after Sennacherib replaced Sargon II as king of Assyria in 705 B.C. This brought about the Assyrian invasion recorded in 18:13-19:36.
c. 18:9. The contrast is startling: under Hezekiah, Judah was being led back to God at the same time that Israel, under Hoshea, was being taken in captivity. My note: Judah=Southern Kingdom. Israel=Northern Kingdom.
2. His deliverance from Sennacherib’s two invasions, 18:13-19:37
a. 18:13. In 701 B.C. “Sennacherib” captured the cities of Judah (46 according to his annals) except Jerusalem.
b. 18:26. The Hebrew officials asked the Assyrians to speak “Aramaic,” the commercial and diplomatic language of the day, so that bystanders would not understand what was being said. Evidently the “Rabshakeh (commander) himself was speaking in Hebrew or through an interpreter.
c. 19:29-31. Jerusalem would not fall to the Assyrians (vs 32-34). Sennacherib was God’s servant as God’s instrument (vs 25).
d. 19:35-36. “Then it happened that night that the angel of the LORD went out and struck 185,000 in the camp of the Assyrians; and when men arose early in the morning behold, all of them were dead.” On the Lord’s defeat of Sennacherib, see note on Isa 37:36. The Lord used a sudden particularly virulent plague to slay the Assyrian army. Herodotus records that the army camp was infected with mice (or rats).See Kings 19:35.
3. His illness and recovery, 20:1-11.
4. His foolishness before the Babylonians, 20:12-21.

B. The reign of Manasseh (695-642 B.C.; 2 Chron 33:1-20), 21:1-18.
1. 21:1. “Manasseh” was Judah’s worst and longest reigning King (cf 24:3).
2. 21:6. “He made his son pass through the fire.” Concerning human sacrifice, see 16:3.
3. 21:13. Jerusalem would be judged according to the same righteousness standard as were Samaria and Ahab, and as a result would be destroyed.
4. 21:16. According to tradition, Manasseh killed Isaiah (See introduction to Isaiah). The Prophet. According to tradition, Isaiah was martyred during the reign of Manasseh (696-642 B.C.) by being sawed in two inside of a hollow log (cf: Heb 11:37).

C. The reign of Amon (642-640 B.C.; 2 Chron 33:21-25) 21:19-26.

D. The reign of Josiah (640-609 B.C.; 2 Chron 34:1-35:27), 22:1-23:30.
1. He repairs the temple, 22:1-7.
2. He recovers the law, 22:8-20.
a. 22:8. “the book of the law.” Possibly the entire Pentateuch or perhaps the book of Deuteronomy or scripture portions such a Lev 26 and Deu 28, which speak of judgment. Manasseh had doubtless destroyed all the copes that had not been hidden.
b. 22:20. “in peace.” Without living to see the destruction of Jerusalem (Nebuchadnezzar’s first attack came four years after Josiah was killed in battle; 23:29-30).
3. He renews the covenant, 23:1-3.
4. He reforms the nation, 23:4-30.
a. 23:22. “such a Passover.” None had been observed in strict conformity to the law since the days of the judges, though the Passover was observed by Hezekiah (2 Chron 30). Further details of this Passover are recorded in 2 Chron 35.
c. 23:29. “Pharoah Neco king of Egypt (609-594) went up to the king of Assyria to help him against Nabopolassar, king of Babylon. Additional details are found in 2 Chron 35:20-24.

E. The reign of Jehoahaz (609 B.C.; 2 Chron 36:1-4), 23:31-33.

F. The reign of Jehoiakim (Eliakim; 609-597 B.C.; 2 Chron 36:5-8), 23:34-24:7.
1. 23:35. “Jehoiakim” became a vassal to Egypt for four years, exacting the tribute from all the people (though he built a luxurious palace for himself, Jer 22:13-14). See notes on Jer 25:1 and Dan 1:1.
2. 24:1. After the battle of Carchemish in 605 B.C. (which ended the rule of Egypt), Nebuchadnezzar entered Jerusalem, made Jehoiakim a vassal, and took Daniel and others to Babylon.

G. The reign of Jehoiachin (597 B.C.; 2 Chron 36:9-10). 24:8-16.
1. 24:10. The second invasion of Jerusalem by Nebuchadnezzar, in 597 B.C. See introduction to Jeremiah for the chronology.
2. 24:13. Concerning Nebuchadnezzar’s stripping the Temple of its treasures, see note on Dan 1:2.

H. The reign of Zedekiah (Mattaniah; 597-586 B.C.; 2 Chron 36:11-21), 24:17-25:21.
1. Rebellion against Babylon and destruction of the Temple, 24:17-25:10.
a. 24:17. None of Jehoiachin’s sons reigned on Judah’s throne, as Jeremiah predicted (22:30).
b. 25:1. The final siege of Jerusalem began in January 588 B.C. and lasted a year and a half.
c. 25:4. The city was broken into on July 16, 586 B.C. “of the Arabah.” The Jordan Valley. King Zedekiah was captured at Jericho (v.5).
d. 25:7. Jeremiah had warned Zedekiah that he would see Nebuchadnezzar (Jer 32:4; 34:3), but Ezekiel predicted that he would not see Babylon (Ezek 12:13). How accurately bot these prophecies were fulfilled!
2. Third deportation to Babylon, 25:11-21.

I. Gedaliah, the Puppet Governor (586 B.C.), 25:22-26.
1. “Gedaliah.” A friend of Jeremiah (Jer 39:14), he was a worthy governor but was assassinated because he placed trust in unworthy men (v.23: cf. Jer 40:14).

J. The release of Jehoiachin in Babylon, 25:27-30.
1. 25:27-30. Babylonian tablets confirm that Jehoiachin, his sons and others received rations from Nebuchadnezzar’s stores. After the death of Nebuchadnezzar, Evil-Merodach, attempting to gain favor with the captive Jews, released Jehoiachin from prison and treated well.

Part 4. Video Details.

I. Video Overview: I and II Kings

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B. Overview: 1-2 Kings. Apr 2, 2016. BibleProject.

C. Watch our overview video on the books of 1-2 Kings, which breaks down the literary design of the book and its flow of thought. In Kings, David’s son Solomon leads Israel to greatness, only to fail and lead Israel to a civil war and ultimately towards destruction and exile.

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Israel’s Kings And Conflicts – 1 Kings

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Part 1. Introduction.

I. Video Information. 1 Kings -This video will provide a quick overview of the first book of Kings. Its video details can be found at the bottom of this page.

II. Lesson Overview.

A. The author of 1 Kings was Jeremiah. The date of the writing was ca., 550 b.c.

B. The timeline for this study will be from 1010 B.C. until 876 B.C., (Ryrie Study Bible, Copyright 1986). The outline of 1 Kings is taken from the same Ryrie Study Bible.

C. Key events of 1 Kings are: David becomes king of Judah, 1010 B.C. David becomes king over all Israel, 1003 b.c. Solomon born, 991 B.C. Solomon becomes king, 970 B.C. Temple completed, 959 B.C. Rehoboam becomes king of Judah, 931 B.C. Jeroboam becomes king of Israel, 931 B.C. King Shishak of Egypt attacks Jerusalem, 925 B.C. Asa becomes king of Judah, 911 B.C. Elijah begins prophetic ministry, 874 B.C. Ahab becomes king of Israel, 874 B.C. Jehoshaphat becomes king of Judah, 873 B.C.

D. When the Temple in Jerusalem was completed and dedicated, significant events of Holiness occurred.

1. 1 Kings 8:10-11. God’s Holy Spirit was so strong that the priests could not stand, “for the glory of the Lord filled the house of the LORD” (Ex 40:34-35; 2 Chron 7:1-2).

2. I Kings 8:12. Solomon recognized the cloud as the symbol of God’s presence and favor (Ex 19:9; Lev 16:2).

3. Solomon’s extreme reverence to God in the Temple dedication as he prayed, and in his posture of prayer (1 Kings 8:61, 2 Chron 6:1-7:3).

a. 1 Kings 8:22-23. 22 Then Solomon stood before the altar of the LORD in the presence of all the assembly of Israel and spread out his hands toward heaven. 23 He said, “O LORD, the God of Israel, there is no God like You in heaven above or on earth beneath, keeping covenant and showing lovingkindness to Your servants who walk before You with all their heart (NASB).

b. 1 Kings 8:54-56. 54 When Solomon had finished praying this entire prayer and supplication to the LORD, he arose from before the altar of the LORD, from kneeling on his knees with his hands spread toward heaven. 55 And he stood and blessed all the assembly of Israel with a loud voice, saying: 56“Blessed be the LORD, who has given rest to His people Israel, according to all that He promised; not one word has failed of all His good promise, which He promised through Moses His servant (NASB).

c. 1 Kings 8:65. The dedication of the Temple lasted “seven days” and the the Feast of Booths another seven days. See 2 Chron 7:9-10. (mine: the Feast of Booths is the same event as the Feast of Tabernacles; “God tabernacled with His people, Israel. During the Kingdom Age of the Millennium, God will also Tabernacle with His people (all saved Jews and Gentiles) through Christ who will be ruling from Jerusalem, Isa 2:1-4).

d. 1 Kings 9:25. Once the temple had been built, Solomon’s practice of sacrificing to God at the various high places ceased (cf. 3:2–4). He kept Israel’s 3 great annual feasts, Unleavened Bread, Pentecost, and Tabernacles, at the temple in Jerusalem. (MacArthur Study Bible). Deut 16:16, “Three times in a year all your males shall appear before the LORD your God in the place which He chooses, at the Feast of Unleavened Bread, and at the Feast of Weeks, and at the Feast of Booths, and they shall not appear before the LORD empty-handed.

E. Jeroboam and Rehoboam are key figures in this study. They must be discussed in order to understand their individual significance in Israel after the death of Solomon in approximately 930 B.C.

1. How do we distinguish between Jeroboam and Rehoboam? They were not brothers. Jeroboam was the son of Nebat; Rehoboam was the son of King Solomon. 1 Kings 11:26-28 describes the relationship between Solomon and Jeroboam, in that Jeroboam was appointed over all the forced labor of the house of Joseph, which included the tribes of Ephraim and Manasseh (The Bible Knowledge Commentary – Old Testament).

2. Jeroboam “jumped;” Rehoboam “remained.” Jeroboam “jumped north” from Jerusalem with 10 tribes, and ruled over the northern kingdom, into an area that became known as Ephraim, Israel, and Samaria; they intermarried with pagans. Rehoboam “remained” in Jerusalem, and ruled over the tribes of Judah and Benjamin, which became known as Judah, and the southern kingdom. The northern kingdom was destroyed by the Assyrians in 722 B.C. The southern kingdom was destroyed in 586 B.C. by the Babylonians.

Part 2. Supportive Information. Scofield Reference Notes. Bio can be found in the About Sources page of this site.

I. Book Overview – 1 Kings – by C.I. Scofield

A. Book Introduction – 1 Kings

1. First Kings records the death of David, the reign of Solomon, the building of the temple, death of Solomon, division of the kingdom under Rehoboam and Jeroboam, and the history of the two kingdoms to the reign of Jehoram over Judah, and Ahaziah over Samaria.

2. First Kings Includes the mighty ministry of Elijah.

3. The events recorded in First Kings cover a period of 118 years (Ussher).

B. Book Breakdown. The book is in six parts:

1. From the rebellion of Adonijah to the death of David, 1 Kings 1:1 to 1 Kings 2:11.

2. From the accession of Solomon to the dedication of the temple, 1 Kings 2:12 to 1 Kings 8:66.

3. From the division of the kingdom to the death of Jeroboam and Rehoboam, 1 Kings 12:1 to 1 Kings 14:31.

4. The kingdoms to the accession of Ahab, 1 Kings 15:1 to 1 Kings 16:28.

5. Accession of Ahab to his death, 1 Kings 16:29 to 1 Kings 22:40.

6. From the reign of Jehoshaphat to the accession of Jehoram over Judah, and Ahaziah over Samaria, 1 Kings 22:41-53.

Part 3. Lesson Outline.

I. The United Kingdom. 1:1-11:43.

A. The accession of Solomon. (2 Chron 1:1-7) 1:1-3:1.
1. The struggle for the succession. 1:1-53.
2. The final charge of David to Solomon. 2:1-12.
3. The purge initiated by Solomon. 2:13-46.
4. The marriage of Solomon. 3:1.

B. The wisdom of Solomon. 3:2-4:34.
1. Solomon’s request for wisdom. 3:2-15.
2. Solomon’s display of wisdom. 3:16-28.
3. Solomon’s administration. 4:1-28.
4. Solomon’s fame. 4:29-34.

C. The temple of Solomon. (2 Chron 2:1-7:22) 5:1-8:66.
1. Preparations for the Temple. 5:1-18.
2. Description and construction of the Temple. 6:1-38.
a. 6:1. The date is 967 B.C. and Ziv is the second month (April-May). On the relation of this date to the Exodus, see the Introduction to Exodus.
b. 6:14. This Temple stood until destroyed by the Babylonians in 586 B.C.
c. 6:16-17. “the most holy place” (Holy of Holies) occupied one-third of the interior space of the Temple, and the Holy Place two-thirds.
d. 6:19-20. “inner sanctuary.” The Holy of Holies. “altar” of incense.”
e. 6:31-35. Olivewood doors separated the Holy of Holies from the Holy Place (apparently there was also a curtain, 2 Chron 3:14), and the doors in the Temple proper matched them.
f. 6:38. Seven years later, in “Bul” (Oct-Nov), the Temple was completed.
3. Construction of other buildings. 7:1-12.
4. Furnishing the Temple. 7:13-51.
a. 7:46. Excavations have shown that this area (“Succoth” was E of the Jordan and just N of the Jabbok River) was a center of metallurgy.
b. 7:48-50. On the articles in the Tabernacle similar to these, see notes on Ex 25.
c. 7:51. “things dedicated.” Likely an enormous amount of spoils taken in wars.
5. Dedication of the Temple. 8:1-66.
a. 8:2. Eleven months after the completion of the Temple (6:38).
b. 8:9. See Heb 9:4, which refers to the contents of the ark when it stood in the Tabernacle and contained the law, Aaron’s rod and manna. Apparently the latter two items had been lost by this time. (Some think they were never placed in the ark, but alongside it; cf Ex 16:33-34; Num 17:10.)
c. 8:10-11. God’s Holy Spirit was so strong that the priests could not stand, “for the glory of the Lord filled the house of the LORD.”
c. 8:12. Solomon recognized the cloud as the symbol of God’s presence and favor (Ex 19:9; Lev 16:2).
d. 8:22. (mine). See the reverence of Solomon for God. “Then Solomon stood before the altar of the Lord in the presence of all the assembly of Israel and spread out his hands toward heaven.”
e. 8:23-53. Solomon’s great prayer. (mine: See 8:30, “Your people Israel.”)
f. 8:54-55. (mine: see the reverence of Solomon for God.)

D. The fame of Solomon. (2 Chron 8:1-9:28), 9:1-10:29.
1. His covenant with God. 9:1-9.
a. 9:6-7. As far as the Temple, and people, are concerned, it is clearly stated that it will be destroyed, and they will into captivity if they are unfaithful; but the Davidic dynasty will nut be put aside (Ps 89:30-37).
b. 9:8. “a heap of ruins.” The text is uncertain, though the meaning is that the revered Temple will be destroyed (2 Chron 7:21).
2. His gifts to Hiram. 9:10-14.
3. His subjects. 9:15-25.
a. 9:15. Megiddo. An important fortification controlling a pass between the plains of Esdraelon and Sharon and the site of the future battle of Armageddon. See note on Rev 16:16.
b. 9:25. “three times in a year.”I.e., the feasts of Unleavened Bread, Pentecost and Booths.
4. His navy. 9:26-28.
5. His visit from the queen of Sheba. 10:1-13.
6. His wealth. 10:14-29.

E. The downfall of Solomon. 11:1-43.
1. The reasons. 11:1-8.
2. The warning. 11:9-13.
a. 11:11. (mine: “I will surely tear the Kingdom from you. (See comments on 11:13.)
b. 11:12. (mine: “I will tear it out of the hand of your son. (See comments on 11:13.)
c. 11:13. “one tribe.” I.e., Judah, to which small Benjamin was indissolubly connected, for Jerusalem straddled the territory of both tribes (cf. 11:32 and 12:21). Simeon, the tribe S of Judah, had apparently migrated N and was counted with the 10 northern tribes (cf. 1 Chron 12:23-25; 2 Chron 15:9; 34:6). (mine: Re: 11:11-12).
3. The Adversaries. 11:14-28.
4. The prophecy of Ahijah. 11:29-40.
a. 11:37. “one tribe.” The ten northern tribes.
b. 11:40. “Shishak.” Sheshonk I, who reigned 945-924 B.C. and gave political asylum to Jeroboam. Later (in 925) he invaded Jerusalem, exacting heavy tribute from Judah (14:25-26.
5. The death of Solomon. 11:41-43.
a. 11:42. Solomon reigned over Jerusalem for forty years.
b. 11:43. Solomon died; his son, Rehoboam reigned in his place.

II. The Divided Kingdom. 12:1-22:53.

A. The rupture in the Kingdom. 12:1-24.
1. The request of the northern tribes. 12:1-4.
a. 12:1. “Shechem.” First mentioned in Gen 12:6, it was in the territory of Ephraim, near present day Nabius (see also Judg 9:1).
b. 12:2. Jeroboam. See 11:26-40. “Jeroboam, the son of Nebat,…also rebelled against the King (Solomon). He became the spokesman to present the grievances of the people to the king.
2. The reply of Rehoboam. 12:5-15
3. The revolt of the northern tribes. 12:16-24.

B. The reign of Jeroboam in Israel (931-910 B.C.). 12:25-14:20.
1. Establishing religious worship centers. 12:25-33.
a. 12:25. “Penuel.” Located E of the Jordan, it served to keep those tribes who lived in that area from being invaded by Rehoboam or Shishak (14:24).
b. 12:29. Jeroboam placed one golden calf in Bethel, which was on the road to Jerusalem and 11 mi N of the city, and the other calf in the northernmost part of his kingdom, in Dan.
c. 12:31. Jeroboam also infiltrated the priesthood with non-Levites.
d. 12:32. “a feast.” Probably Booths, observed one month later (Lev 23:34).
2. Encountering the man of God. 13:1-32.
a. 13:2. This prediction, naming “Josiah,” was fulfilled about 300 years later (2 Kings 23:15-20).
b. 13:32. “Samaria.” Later the capital of the 10 northern tribes and here to designate that entire area.
3. Elevating non-Levites to the priesthood. 13:33-34.
4. Experiencing his son’s sickness and Ahijah’s prophecy. 14:1-18.
5. Expiring. 14:19-20.
a. 14:19. Jeroboam made war and reigned. (mine: Jeroboam, the son of Nebat, reigned over the 10 tribes of the northern kingdom.)
b. 14:20. Jeroboam died, having reigned 22 years. Nadab, his son, reigned in his place.

C. The reign of Rehoboam in Judah (931-913 B.C.; 2 Chron 10:1-12:16). 14:21-31.
1. Apostasy in Judah. 14:21-24.
2. Attack by Shishak of Egypt. 14:25-28.
3. Death of Rehoboam. 14:29-31.
a. 14:30. There was war between Rehoboam and Jeroboam continually.
b. 14:31. Rehoboam died, and his son, Abijam ruled in his place.

D. The reign of Abijam (Abijah) in Judah. (913-911 B.C.; 2 Chron 13:1-22). 15:1-8.

E. The reign of Asa in Judah. (911-870 B.C.; 2 Chron 14:1-16:14). 15:9-24.
1. His reforms. 15:9-15.
2. His war with Baasha. 15:16-24.

F. The reign of Nabab in Israel (910-909 B.C.) 15:25-31.

G. The reign of Baasha in Israel (909-886 B.C.) 15:32-16:7.

H. The reign of Elah in Israel (886-885 B.C.) 16:8-14.

I. The reign of Zimri in Israel (885 B.C.) 16:15-20.

J. The reign of Omri in Israel (885-874 B.C.) 16:21-28.

K. The reign of Ahab in Israel (874-853 B.C.) 16:29-22:40.
1. The beginning of Ahab’s reign. 16:29-34.
2. Elijah’s prediction of drought. 17:1.
3. God’ provision for Elijah. 17:2-24.
4. Elijah’s challenge to the priests of Baal. 18:1-46.
5. Elijah’s flight to Horeb. 19:1-18.
6. Elijah’s appointment of Elisha. 19:19-21.
7. Ahab’s Aramean victories. 20:1-43.
8. Ahab’s desire to have Naboth’s vineyard. 21:1-29.
9. Ahab’s final battle. 22:1-40.

L. The reign of Jehoshaphat in Judah (873-848 B.C.; 2 Chron 17:1-20:37). 22:41-50.

M. The reign of Ahaziah in Israel (853 B.C.). 22:51-53.

Part 4. Video Details.

I. Video Overview: 1-2 Kings.

A. #Kings #BibleProject #BibleVideo

B. Overview: 1-2 Kings. Apr 2, 2016. BibleProject.

C. Watch our overview video on the books of 1-2 Kings, which breaks down the literary design of the book and its flow of thought. In Kings, David’s son Solomon leads Israel to greatness, only to fail and lead Israel to a civil war and ultimately towards destruction and exile.

II. Website: http://www.thebibleproject.com

A. Explore our videos: https://thebibleproject.com/explore/
B. Download resources: https://thebibleproject.com/other-resources/
C. Listen to podcasts: https://thebibleproject.com/podcasts/the-bible-project-podcast/

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Israel’s Kings And Conflicts – 2 Samuel

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Part 1. Introduction.

I. Opening Video Information. 2 Samuel -This video will provide a quick overview of the second book of Samuel. Its video details can be found at the bottom of this page.

II. Lesson Overview.

A. The timeline for this 2 Samuel study will be from 1050 B.C. until 970 B.C. (Ryrie Study Bible, Copyright 1986).

B. The key events of 2 Samuel are: Saul becomes king 1050 B.C. David born 1040 B.C. David becomes king of Judah 1010. David becomes king of all Israel 1003. Solomon born 991 B.C. Solomon becomes king 970 B.C.

C. In this article, we will discuss the events of the above stated time frame. In this study of the second Book of Samuel, we will find Scripture that will take us back to the Book of Genesis, which will carry us forward to the Book of Revelation.

D. The key passage of this book is found in chapter 7:8-17, which is the Davidic Covenant. Per the Scofield Study Bible, “The Davidic Covenant, upon which the future Kingdom Of Christ, ‘who was descended from David according to the flesh’ (Rom 1:3) was to be founded, provided for David:” See details of the Davidic Covenant in the following Scofield Reference Notes link: https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/srn/2-samuel-7.html Additional details are provided below in Part 3, Lesson Outline.

Part 2. Supportive Information.

I. Book of Samuel. See Israel’s Kings And Conflicts – 1 Samuel.

II. Abrahamic Covenant stated. Land, seed, and blessing. Genesis 12:1-3. (See Ryrie Study Bible notes for A., B., C. below.)

A. 12:1 The land, i.e., Canaan. Abraham was still in Haran when this call, originally given to him in Ur (Acts 7:2), was reiterated.

B. 12:2 The seed. “a great nation.” When God made this promise, Abraham had no son. The reference is to the Jewish nation (i.e., the descendants of Abraham through Isaac and Jacob). “I will bless you, And make your name great.” This promise was fulfilled in Abraham’s temporal blessings (13:2; 24:35), spiritual blessings (21:22), and fame (23:6; Isa 41:8). “so you shall be a blessing.” Lit., be a blessing, a certain consequence of God’s blessing upon Abraham.

C. 12:3 “bless…curse.” Abraham’s relation to God was so close that to bless or curse him was, in effect, to bless or curse God. See examples in 20:2-18; 21:22-34; 23:1-20. “in you all the families of the earth shall be blessed.” This promise was fulfilled in the coming of Abraham’s seed, Christ (Gal 3:8, 16).

III. Abrahamic Covenant confirmed. Boundaries of the land. Genesis 15:18:21.

A. The boundaries of the Promised Land are now given for the first time. This promise has not yet been fulfilled but will be when Christ returns (Ryrie Study Bible). See notes on Gen 17:8; Josh 21:43-45, below.
1. Genesis 17:8. The possession of Canaan is the only focus of this statement of the covenant. God said that this was fulfilled under Joshua (Josh 21:43). The fulfillment of the total territory promised in Gen 15:18 awaits the establishing of the millennial kingdom.
2. Joshua 21:43-45. God had kept His promise to give Israel the land of Canaan as recorded in Gen 17:8. It is true that the Israelites had not yet fully conquered it, but God had told them they would do so gradually. See note on Deu 7:22. The promise of Gen 15:18-20 involving a larger territory will be fulfilled in the Millennium.
3. Deuteronomy 7:22. The conquest of Canaan would be progressive so that there would not be an excessive accumulation of corpses and desolate land to attract dangerous animals.

B. The geographical boundaries of Israel’s land — “from the river of Egypt” (Wadi el-Arish, not the Nile River) “to the great river, the Euphrates.” Israel has never possessed this land in its entirety, but she will when Christ returns to reign as Messiah. The Canaanite tribes listed (Gen 15:19-21) were dispossessed later in the Conquest (The Bible Knowledge Commentary – Old Testament).

C. We will discuss more details about Israel and the Kingdom Age of the Millennium in future articles. The following post, “Rev 20 – The Millennium – To Rule And Reign With Christ,” goes into great detail as to whom will be allowed in the Kingdom; the link to that post is:
https://equippingblog.wordpress.com/2020/02/02/rev-20-the-millennium-to-rule-and-reign-with-christ/

D. The intimate relationship that God has with Israel is undeniable. Consider: Deu 14:2, Neh 9:13, Ps 147:19-20, Ez 36:24-29.

E. In relation to the return of Christ to reign as Messiah, this event will take place at the end of the tribulation when Jews call on Him to save them from the destruction that they see facing them (Matt 23:39; 24:21-22; Zech 12:10; Rev 19:19-21; 20:4). The elect in Matt 24:22 are Jews, per Deu 14:2; they were left behind from the catching up of the saints (1 Thes 4:16-17). A music video that relates to Matt 23:39 can be found at the bottom of this article.

Part 3. Lesson Outline. The outline of 2 Samuel is taken from the same Ryrie Study Bible. (See About Sources page of this site for bio of Dr. Ryrie.

I. David’s Coronation Over The Kingdom. 1:1-5:6.

A. The time of the coronation (After Saul’s death). 1:1-27.
1. The report of Saul’s death. 1:1-10.
2. The reaction to Saul’s death. 1:11-16.
3. The remorse over Saul’s death. 1:17-27.

B. The extend of the Kingdom (over Judah). 2:1-7.

C. The efforts to include the other tribes. 2:8-4:12.
1. The rival, Ish-bosheth. 2:8-11.
2. The civil war. 2:12-4:12.
a. Abner vs Joab. 2:12-32.
b. Abner deserts Ish-bosheth. 3:1-21.
c. Joab murders Abner. 3:22-39.
d. The murder of Ish-bosheth. 4:1-12.

D. David enthroned over All the Tribes. 5:1-6.

II. David’s Consolidation Of The Kingdom. 5:7-6:23.

A. The government established in Jerusalem. 5:7-25.

B. The ark brought to Jerusalem. 6:1-23.

III. David’s Covenant Concerning The Kingdom. 7:1-29.

Note. MacArthur Study Bible. 7:1–17 See 1 Chr. 17:1–15. These verses record the establishment of the Davidic Covenant, God’s unconditional promise to David and his posterity. While not called a covenant here, it is later (23:5). This promise is an important key to understanding God’s irrevocable pledge of a king from the line of David to rule forever (v. 16).

A. David’s proposal. 7:1-3.

B. God’s disposal. 7:4-29.
1. God’s promise. 7:4-17.
2. David’s praise. 7:18-29.

IV. David’s Conquests For The Kingdom. 8:1-10:19.

A. David defeats the Philistia, Moab, Zobah, Aram, Edom. 8:1-18.

B. David shows kindness to Mephibosheth. 9:1-13.

C. David defeats Ammon. 10:1-19.

V. David’s Crimes Within The Kingdom. 11:1-27.

A. Adultery. 11:1-13.

B. Murder. 11:14-17.

VI. David’s Conflicts In The Kingdom. 12:1-20:26.

A. The death of David’s baby, and his restoration to power. 12:1-31.

B. The incest of Ammon. 13:1-39.

C. The rebellion of Absalom. 14:1-18:33.
1. Absalom returns. 14:1-33.
2. Absalom revolts. 15:1-12.
3. Absalom routs David. 15:13-16:14.
4. Absalom rules in Jerusalem. 16:15-17:23.
5. Absalom is defeated and dies. 17:24-18:33.

D. Disorder in he Kingdom. 19:1-39.

E. Revolution in the Kingdom.19:40-20:26.

VII. David’s Conclusion In The Kingdom. 21:1-24:25.

A. The famine. 21:1-14.

B. The exploits. 21:15-22.

C. The song of David. 22:1-51.

D. The last words of David. 23:1-7.

E. The deeds of David’s mighty men. 23:8-39.

F. The census and plague. 24:1-25.

Part 4. Closing Video.

Paul Wilbur – Baruch Haba Blessed Is He Who Comes – Matthew 23:39

Part 5. Video Details.

I. Opening Video. 2 Samuel.

A. Video Overview: 2 Samuel. March 26, 2016. #Samuel #BibleProject #BibleVideo
Watch our overview video on the book of 2 Samuel, which breaks down the literary design of the book and its flow of thought. In 2 Samuel, David becomes God’s most faithful king, but then rebels, resulting in the slow destruction of his family and kingdom.

B. Website: http://www.thebibleproject.com

1. Explore our videos: https://thebibleproject.com/explore/
2. Download resources: https://thebibleproject.com/other-resources/
3. Listen to podcasts: https://thebibleproject.com/podcasts/the-bible-project-podcast/

II. Closing Video. Paul Wilbur – Baruch Haba Blessed Is He Who Comes

Juan Rodriguez. December 12, 2010.

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Israel’s Kings And Conflicts – 1 Samuel

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Part 1. Introduction.

I. Video Information. 1 Samuel -This video will provide a quick overview of the first book of Samuel. Its video details can be found at the bottom of this page.

II. Lesson Overview.

A. In this series of studies, we will go back into the Old Testament. We will look at Israel, as “God’s chosen people” (Deu 14:2) continue their travel toward the promised land of the Abrahamic Covenant. We will discuss key events that take place from 1 Samuel, through the time of the fall of Jerusalem at the hands of Nebuchadnezzar and his Babylonian troops. The timeline for this study will be from 1171 B.C., (Scofield Study Bible, Copyright 1909), until 586 B.C., (Ryrie Study Bible, Copyright 1986). The outline of 1 Samuel is taken from the same Ryrie Study Bible.

B. Timeline of 1 Samuel. Israel judged by judges 1375 BC. Samuel born 1085 BC. Saul born 1080 BC. Saul becomes king 1050 BC. David born 1040 B.C. David becomes king of Judah 1010 BC. David becomes king over all Israel 1003 BC. Solomon born 991 B.C. Solomon becomes king 970 BC. The Part III study outline of this 1 Samuel lesson comes from the Ryrie Study Bible (Bio can be found in my About Sources page of this site.)

C. We are continuing this study from where Israel fled Egypt and crossed through the Red Sea in the topic lesson
“Israel 10 – Exodus 15-24, dated April 7, 2019.” Our last topic lesson was “Judges 10-16 , Ruth, December 6, 2019.”

D. Beginning with this article, we will continue our study of Israel. We will cover the books of 1 Samuel through 2 Chronicles, and provide the highlights of each of these six books. As I have stated before, this is not a verse by verse study of each book. Instead, the study will be based on a prophetic timeline of God’s chosen people (Deuteronomy 14:2).

E. After King Solomon’s death, the Kingdom of Israel became divided into the northern and southern kingdoms. Of the kings of the northern kingdom, all of its nineteen kings were unrighteous. Of the kings of the southern kingdom, of its twenty kings, twelve were unrighteous and only eight were righteous. http://biblesanity.org/docs/kings.pdf

Part 2. Supportive Information. Scofield Reference Notes. Bio can be found in the About Sources page of this site.

I. Book Overview – 1 Samuel, by C.I. Scofield. This book represents the personal history of Samuel, last of the Judges. It records the moral failure of the priesthood under Eli, and of the Judges in Samuel’s attempt to make the office hereditary (1 Samuel 8:1). In his prophetic office Samuel was faithful, and in him begins the line of writing prophets. Henceforth the prophet, not the priest, is conspicuous in Israel. In this book the theocracy, as exercised through judges, ends (1 Samuel 8:7), and the line of kings begins with Saul.

II. Book Breakdown.

A. The story of Samuel to the death of Eli, 1 Samuel 1 Samuel 1:1 to 1 Samuel 4:22.

B. From the taking of the ark to the demand for a king, 1 Samuel 1 Samuel 5:1 to 1 Samuel 8:22.

C. The reign of Saul to the call of David, 1 Samuel 1 Samuel 9:1 to 1 Samuel 15:35.

D. From the call of David to the death of Saul, 1 Samuel 16:1 to 1 Samuel 31:13.

E. The events recorded in First Samuel cover a period of 115 years (Ussher).

Part 3. Lesson Outline.

I. Samuel, the last judge. 1:1-8:22.

A. Samuel’s early life and call. 1:1-3:21
1. His mother. 1:1-2:10.
a. Her sorrow. 1:1-8.
b. Her supplication. 1:9-18.
c. Her son (Samuel). 1:19-23.
d. Her sacrifice. 1:24-28.
e. Her song. 2:1-10.
2. Samuel’s ministry. 2:11-3:21.
a. The situation in Shiloh. 2:11-36.
b. The summons to Samuel. 3:1-21.

B. Samuel’s war with the Philistines. 4:1-7:2.
1. The capture of the ark by the Philistines. 4:1-22.
a. The defeat of Israel. 4:1-11.
b. The death of Eli. 4:12-18.
c. The departure of the Glory: Ichabod. 4:19-22.
2. The curse of the ark on the Philistines. 5:1-12.
3. The return of the ark by the Philistines. 6:1-7:1.

C. Samuel’s revival ministry to Israel. 7:2-17.

D. Samuel’s warning to Israel concerning their demand for a king. 8:1-22.

II. Saul, the first king. 9:1-31:13.

A. The rise of Saul. 9:1-11:15.
1. The choosing of Saul. 9:1-27.
2. The coronation of Saul. 10:1-27.
3. The conquest of the Ammonites. 11:1-15.

B. The reminder by Samuel. 12:1-25.

C. The rejection of Saul. 13:1-15:35.
1. His sinful offering. 13:1-22.
2. His rash vows. 13:23-14:52.
3. His partial obedience. 15:1-35.

D. The replacement of Saul by David. 16:1-23.
1. David chosen and anointed. 16:1-13.
2. David employed at Saul’s court. 16:14-23.

E. The rise of David over Saul. 17:1-18:30.
1. David’s defeat of Goliath. 17:1-58.
2. David’s friendship with Jonathan. 18:1-4.
3. David’s relations with Saul. 18:5-16.
4. David’s marriage. 18:17-30.

F. The rejection of David by Saul. 19:1-26:25.
1. David protected by Jonathan. 19:1-10.
2. David protected by Michal. 19:11-17.
3. David protected by Samuel. 19:18:24.
4. David protected by Jonathan. 20:1-42.
5. David protected by Abimelech. 21:1-9.
6. David protected by Achish. 21:10-15.
7. David and his band of men. 22:1-26:25.
a. In the cave of Adullam and in Mizpah. 22:1-5.
b. Saul slays the priests. 22:6-23.
c. At Keilah. 23:1-12.
d. In the wilderness of Ziph. 23:13-29.
e. At Engedi, David spares Saul. 24:1-22.
f. David and Abigail. 25:1-44.
g. In the wilderness of Ziph, David spares Saul again. 26:1-25.

G. The refuge of David in Philistine Territory. 27:1-31:13.
1. David becomes a Philistine servant. 27:1-28:2.
2. Saul consults the medium at En-dor. 28:3-25.
3. David dismissed by the Philistines. 29:1-11.
4. David destroys the Amalekites. 30:1-31.
5. The Philistines and the death of Saul. 31:1-13.

Part 4. Video Details.

I. Video Overview: 1 Samuel. #Samuel #BibleProject #BibleVideo. BibleProject
Watch our overview video on the book of 1 Samuel, which breaks down the literary design of the book and its flow of thought. In 1 Samuel, God reluctantly raises up kings to rule the Israelites. The first is a failure, and the second, David, is a faithful replacement

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