American History And Slavery – Part 1

“The Spanish, Portuguese and English were co-conspirators in what we would now consider a crime against humanity.” 

The above, and following quote, come from the article on slavery that follows the American History Timeline.

“To ignore what had been happening with relative frequency in the broader Atlantic world over the preceding 100 years or so understates the real brutality of the ongoing slave trade, of which the 1619 group were undoubtedly a part, and minimizes the significant African presence in the Atlantic world to that point,” Guasco explains. “People of African descent have been ‘here’ longer than the English colonies.”

AMERICAN HISTORY

Scroll down on the following link to “American History Timeline” to see the following dates, which are printed below the link.

http://www.datesandevents.org/events-timelines/14-american-history-timeline.htm  

American History Timeline  

1001 Leif Ericson explores North America        
1492 Christopher Columbus discovers America        
1497 John Cabot claims North America for England        
1501 Amerigo Vespucci explores the coast of South America        
1519 Ferdinand Magellan is the first to go around the world
Alonzo de Pineda explores gulf Coast of America        
1524 Giovanni Verrazano discovers New York Bay        
1528 Panfilo de Narvaez conquers Cuba and explores Florida
Alvar Cabeza de Vaca explores Texas, Arizona and New Mexico        
1534 Jacques Cartier explores the Great Lakes and the the St. Lawrence River        
1539 Hernando de Soto explores south-eastern North America        
1540 Francisco Vázquez de Coronado explores south-western North America
Discovery of the Grand Canyon by Garcia Lopez de Cardenas        
1541 Francisco Vásquez de Coronado explores Kansas        
1542 Cabrillo explores and discovers the Californian coast
Juan Rodriguez Cabrillo discovers San Diego Bay, California        
1559 Tristan de Luna explores North America        
1563 Francisco de Ibarra explores New Mexico        
1576S ir Martin Frobisher explores Baffin Bay and the Hudson Strait        
1577 Sir Francis Drake circumnavigates the world – December 13 1577 to September 26 1580        
1584 Philip Amadas and Arthur Barlowe (both in the service of Sir Walter Raleigh) explore the coast of North Carolina        
1585 March 25: Walter Raleigh receives the patent to explore and settle in North America
June: Walter Raleigh’s fleet of seven vessels under Richard Grenville and Ralph Lane, with 108 men, reach Roanoke Island
June 4: Virginia colony of Roanoke Island established by Walter Raleigh        
1598 Juan de Archuleta explores Colorado        
1607 Captain John Smith explorer and founder of Jamestown        
1609 Henry Hudson explores North eastern North America including the Hudson River

Go down 167 years to when the thirteen British Colonies declared their independence from Great Britain. The following is a list of the thirteen colonies. (New Hampshire, Massachusetts, Connecticut, Rhode Island, New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Delaware, Maryland, Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina and Georgia) https://www.history.com/topics/colonial-america/thirteen-colonies

1776 July 4. Thomas Jefferson presents the United States Declaration of Independence

SLAVERY

America’s History Of Slavery Began Long Before Jamestown 1619

The following information was extracted from a much larger article from the following link.

https://www.history.com/news/american-slavery-before-jamestown-1619

In late August 1619, the White Lion, an English privateer commanded by John Jope, sailed into Point Comfort and dropped anchor in the James River. Virginia colonist John Rolfe documented the arrival of the ship and “20 and odd” Africans on board. His journal entry is immortalized in textbooks, with 1619 often used as a reference point for teaching the origins of slavery in America. But the history, it seems, is far more complicated than a single date.

It is believed the first Africans brought to the colony of Virginia, 400 years ago this month (August 26, 2019), were Kimbundu-speaking peoples from the kingdom of Ndongo, located in part of present-day Angola.

As noted by Rolfe, when the White Lion arrived in what is now present-day Hampton, Virginia, the Africans were offloaded and “bought for victuals.” Governor Sir George Yeardley and head merchant Abraham Piersey acquired the majority of the captives, most of whom were kept in Jamestown, America’s first permanent English settlement.

The arrival of these “20 and odd” Africans to England’s mainland American colonies in 1619 is now a focal point in history curricula. The date and their story have become symbolic of slavery’s roots, despite captive Africans likely being present in the Americas in the 1400s and as early as 1526 in the region that would become the United States.

Some experts, including Michael Guasco, a professor at Davidson College and author of Slaves and Englishmen: Human Bondage in the Early Modern Atlantic World, caution about placing too much emphasis on the year 1619.

“To ignore what had been happening with relative frequency in the broader Atlantic world over the preceding 100 years or so understates the real brutality of the ongoing slave trade, of which the 1619 group were undoubtedly a part, and minimizes the significant African presence in the Atlantic world to that point,” Guasco explains. “People of African descent have been ‘here’ longer than the English colonies.”

European trade of enslaved Africans began in the 1400s.

Africans also played a role in England’s early colonization efforts. Enslaved Africans may have been on board Sir Francis Drake’s fleet when he arrived at Roanoke Island in 1586.

“The English took note of their fellow Europeans’ role in enslavement and the slave trade,” says Mark Summers, a public historian at Jamestown Rediscovery. In the context of the broader Atlantic world, the colony and institution of slavery developed from a chain of events involving multiple actors.

While Heywood and Thornton acknowledge that 1619 remains a key date for slavery in America, they also argue that focusing too much on the first enslaved people at Jamestown can distort our understanding of history.

In 1619, slavery, as codified by law, did not yet exist in Virginia or elsewhere in places that would later become the United States.

As Guasco puts it, “The Spanish, Portuguese and English were co-conspirators in what we would now consider a crime against humanity.”

America History And Slavery – Part 2 will provide additional information that will help us to understand the facts of slavery, as it was introduced into the Americas.

The video was that of Prestonwood Baptist Church

Author: Equipping For Eternity Website

Things of significance are discussed in this website, as they relate to eternal life.

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