American History And Slavery – 2

Did Christopher Columbus corrupt the Americas?

Much has been said about how Christopher Columbus corrupted the entire areas of North, Central and South America. A question should be considered, such as, “how could such a small contingent of Columbus’s guest explorers and travelers” be so successful as to ruin the lives of people, who lived as far south as the southern tip of South America, all of the way to the northern tip of Canada? Facts do not allow such a conclusion for the wicked prowess of these people who explored and settled in small coastal areas of Central and South America. Columbus never traveled to North America (USA and Canada). At the time of Columbus’s voyages, the Americas were inhabited by Indigenous Americans, descendants of Paleo-Indians who crossed Beringia from Asia to North America; such people were hardened survivors, who would not be easily manipulated by European explorers and colonists. A greater study of the peoples of the Americas that traveled from Asia to Alaska, can be found in an article that I wrote, and is located at the bottom of this page.

The following information shows pertinent information that relates to the four voyages of Columbus, to include maps that depict his areas of exploration. You will notice dates of voyages, numbers of ships, and numbers of people on each journey. One thing that you will notice is that among the people who traveled with the crews of Columbus, is that none of them were identified as being slaves.

Columbus was an Italian-born navigator sailing for the Crown of Castile (Spain) in search of a westward route to the Indies. Therefore, the colonists that Columbus took to the new world would have been primarily Catholic. In addition to this, plans were made to maintain friars and clergymen. Based on this paragraph’s information, it is easy to see why Central and South America have such a large Catholic populace.

Voyages of Christopher Columbus

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Voyages_of_Christopher_Columbus

From the above link, the following information was extracted.

In 1492, a Spanish-based transatlantic maritime expedition led by Italian explorer Christopher Columbus encountered the Americas, continents which were virtually unknown in Europe, Asia and Africa and were outside the Old World political and economic system. The four voyages of Columbus led to the widespread knowledge that a continent existed west of Europe and east of Asia. This breakthrough in geographical knowledge inaugurated a period of exploration, conquest, colonization, biological exchange, and trans-Atlantic trade, whose effects and consequences persist to the present, and are sometimes cited as the start of the modern era.

It was long believed that Columbus had been the first European explorer to reach the Americas, but in fact he had been preceded by the Viking expedition led by Leif Erikson in the 11th century. However, Columbus’s voyages were the ones that led to ongoing European contact with the Americas.

Columbus was an Italian-born navigator sailing for the Crown of Castile (Spain) in search of a westward route to the Indies, the vaguely rumored East Asian sources of spices and other precious oriental goods obtainable only through arduous overland routes. Although he did not realize it, this search failed when he encountered the New World between Europe and Asia. Columbus made a total of four voyages to the Americas between 1492 and 1502.

At the time of Columbus’ voyages, the Americas were inhabited by Indigenous Americans, descendants of Paleo-Indians who crossed Beringia from Asia to North America.

First voyage (August 3, 1492 – March 15, 1493) Christopher Columbus, Three Ships, Ninety Sailors.

The map of Columbus’s first exploration of the Americas is shown in the following link; you will notice a pause.

Second voyage (September 24, 1493 – June 11, 1496) Columbus, Seventeen Ships, 120 Colonists,

Before he left Spain on his second voyage, Columbus had been directed by Ferdinand and Isabella to maintain friendly, even loving, relations with the natives.He set sail from Cádiz, Spain, on September 24, 1493.

The map of Columbus’s second exploration of the Americas is shown in the following link.

Third voyage (May 30, 1498 -Nov 1500), Columbus, Six Ships and The Following Individuals.

After his second journey, Columbus had requested that 330 people be sent to stay permanently (though voluntarily) on Hispaniola, all on the King’s pay. Specifically, he asked for 100 men to work as wood men soldiers and laborers, 50 farmers, 40 squires, 30 sailors, 30 cabin boys, 20 goldsmiths, 10 gardeners, 20 handymen, and 30 women. In addition to this, plans were made to maintain friars and clergymen, a physician, a pharmacist, an herbalist, and musicians for entertaining the colonists. Fearing that the King was going to restrict money allotted for wages, Columbus suggested that Spanish criminals be pardoned in exchange for a few years unpaid service in Hispaniola, and the King agreed to this. A pardon for the death penalty would require 2 years of service, and one year of service was required for lesser crimes. They also instructed that those who had been sentenced to exile would also be redirected to be exiled in Hispaniola.

The map of Columbus’s third exploration of the Americas is shown in the following link.

Fourth voyage (May 12, 1502 – November 7, 1504) Columbus, Four Ships, and 147 men.

The map of Columbus’s fourth exploration of the Americas is shown in the following link.

Opening Video Information. The video comes from a movie that was made about World War II that was released in 1945.

U.S. Marines on Parade in Dress Blues

An excerpt from the 1942 movie, To The Shores Of Tripoli with Randolph Scott and John Payne.

Please read the following article, which discusses the journeys of those peoples whom would travel from Asia to Alaska, and would settle the Americas.

The Making Of America – 2 – Native Americans (?) – They Came Here Too!

https://equippingblog.wordpress.com/2020/01/11/the-making-of-america-2-native-americans-they-came-here-too/

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Author: Equipping For Eternity Website

Things of significance are discussed in this website, as they relate to eternal life.

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