Revelation 15 – Prelude To The Bowl Judgments


I. Video Data.

What happens to the earth as a result of the vial judgments? This clip is from our series entitled, “Step by Step through the Book of Revelations.” John Ankerberg Show. Dr. Jimmy DeYoung (M. Div., Ph. D.) (1940 – 2021) is the video speaker.


II. Introduction.


Dr. John F. Walvoord  (Th. B., Th. M., Th. D., 1910-2002) Revelation Commentary, 1974.


Chapters 15 and 16 of Revelation bring to consummation the chronologically ordered events leading up to the second coming of Christ described in chapter 19. These are introduced in this chapter as “the seven last plagues” which are the divine judgments preceding the second coming of Christ. As previously indicated, the chronological order of events in Revelation is presented basically in the seven seals (6:1-17; 8:1). The seventh seal includes all of the seven trumpets (8:1-9:21; 11:15-19). The seven vials or bowls of divine judgment are included in the seventh trumpet. From this it can be seen that the order of events is one of dramatic crescendo, the seventh seal being all-inclusive of the end-time events including the seven trumpets, and the seventh trumpet including the events described in the seven vials. The second coming of Christ follows this order of events immediately after the seventh vial. The intervening sections such as 10:1-11:14; 13-14; 17-19 do not advance the narrative chronologically. Chapter 19 of Revelation follows immediately after chapter 16 in the chronological development.


III. Scripture Text. Revelation 14. New American Standard Bible (NASB 1995). Pasted from Bible Gateway.

A Scene of Heaven

1 Then I saw another sign in heaven, great and marvelous, seven angels who had seven plagues, which are the last, because in them the wrath of God is finished.

And I saw something like a sea of glass mixed with fire, and those who had been victorious over the beast and his image and the number of his name, standing on the sea of glass, holding harps of God. And they *sang the song of Moses, the bond-servant of God, and the song of the Lamb, saying,

“Great and marvelous are Your works,
O Lord God, the Almighty;
Righteous and true are Your ways,
King of the nations!
“Who will not fear, O Lord, and glorify Your name?
For You alone are holy;
For all the nations will come and worship before You,
For Your righteous acts have been revealed.”

After these things I looked, and the temple of the tabernacle of testimony in heaven was opened, and the seven angels who had the seven plagues came out of the temple, clothed in linen, clean and bright, and girded around their chests with golden sashes. Then one of the four living creatures gave to the seven angels seven golden bowls full of the wrath of God, who lives forever and ever. And the temple was filled with smoke from the glory of God and from His power; and no one was able to enter the temple until the seven plagues of the seven angels were finished.

IV. Examination. 


Dr. Charles C. Ryrie (Th. M., Th. D., Ph. D., 1925-2016). Ryrie Study Bible, 1986, 1995,


A. 15:2-3. The martyrs sing “the song of Moses,” praising God for His faithfulness and deliverance (Ex 15 and Deu 32) and magnifying God’s holiness and righteousness

B. 15:5. “the temple of the tabernacle.” I.e., the Holy of Holies.”


V. Reinforcement.  


A. Dr. David Hocking. Bachelor of Arts in Bible, Greek and Ancient History; Master of Divinity in Biblical Studies & Systematic Theology; Doctor of Philosophy in Biblical Studies and Languages; Doctor of Ministry in Pastoral Studies.

1. The Seven Last Plagues: The scroll with seven seals is now opened. The 7th seal was opened in Rev 8:1, at which time we were introduced to seven angels, with seven trumpets. The seventh trumpet message is the longest, and began with the announcement of Rev 11:15. Within that 7th message are several signs and visions. 

2. Signs Of The Seventh Trumpet: a. The woman. b. The dragon. c. The seven last plagues.

3. Visions Of The Seventh Trumpet: a. The beast with seven heads. b. The beast with two horns. c. The 144,000 Jews. d. The gospel and judgments. e. The final harvest. f. The heavenly temple and the seven last plagues.


B.  Dr. J. Dwight Pentecost (Th. B., Th. D.; 1915-2014) Things To Come, 1958. 

1. Page 235. The nature or character of this period is that of: “wrath, judgment, indignation, trial, trouble, destruction, darkness, desolation, overturning, punishment.” No passage can be found to alleviate, to any degree, whatsoever, the severity of this time that shall come upon the earth. 

2. Page 217. 

a. 1 Thes 5:9-10. 9 “For God has not destined us for wrath, but for obtaining salvation through our Lord Jesus Christ.” 10 who died for us, so that whether we are awake or asleep, we will live together with Him.”

b. Paul clearly teaches in this passage that our expectation and appointment is not to wrath and darkness, but rather to salvation, and verse 10 indicates the method that salvation, namely, “to live together with him.” Paul clearly indicates that our expectation is not of wrath, but of the revelation of “His Son from heaven.” This could not be unless the Son were revealed before the wrath of the 70th week falls on the earth.

c. Page 195. Our blessed Lord bore for us the wrath of God and His judgment; therefore, we who are in Him, “shall not come into judgment.” There can be no question that this period will see the wrath of God poured out upon the whole earth. Rev 3:10; Isa 24:1, 4-5, 16-17, 18-21, and many other passages make this very clear. And yet, while the whole earth is in view, this period is particularly in relation to Israel. Jeremiah 30:7, which calls this period, “the time of Jacob’s trouble,” makes this certain. The events of the 70th week (of Daniel) are events of the “Day of the Lord.” This use of the name of deity emphasizes God’s peculiar relationship to that nation. When this period is being anticipated in Daniel 9, God says to the prophet, “Seventy weeks are determined upon thy people and upon thy holy city (v 24). This whole period then has special reference to Daniel’s people, Israel, and Daniel’s holy city, Jerusalem.


VI. Ryrie cross references for verses that have no examination.

A.  15:1. Rev 12:1, 3; 15:6-8; 16:1; 17:1; 21:9; Lev 26:21; Rev 9:20. 

B. 15:4. Jer 10:7; Rev 14:7; Ps 86:9; Isa 66:23; Rev 19:8.

C. 15:6. Rev 1:13.

D. 15:7. Rev 4:6; 15:1; 5:8; 14:10; 15:1; 4:9.

E. 15:8. Ex 19:18; 40:34; Lev 16:2; 1 Kin 8:10; 2 Chr 5:13; Isa 6:4.


VII.  My Bucket List shows the references, of people and documents, that I use when I write my articles.


https://equippingblog.wordpress.com/bucket-list/embed/


VIII. My Websites To Follow.

https://untotheleastofthese.home.blog/ Equipping The Saints Web Site

https://thechurchoftheopendoor.wordpress.com/ Israel Web Site

https://success2693.wordpress.com/ Israel, History And Prophecy

https://equippingblog.wordpress.com/ Eternity

Author: Eternity

Things are discussed in this website that relate to God's creation, from "eternity to eternity," and all that is addressed within those parameters. Consider Isaiah 43:13, "Even from eternity I am He, And there is no one who can rescue from My hand; I act, and who can reverse it?” The Moody Study Bible adds a comment: "God is the ruler of all, and there is nothing that can stand against Him. His will is irresistible. The Bible Knowledge Commentary adds this thought: "No one can reverse what God puts into action or thwart His plans." The articles that are found in this site may relate to anything that is found in the Bible, from Genesis 1:1 to Revelation 22.21, as well as anything that may relate to the Bible.

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