Matthew 13 (2 of 2)

I. Video.  Matthew Chapter 13 (2 of 2)

A. Title. The Parable of the Weeds Explained – The Parables of the Hidden Treasure and the Pearl – The Parable of the Net – A Prophet Without Honor

B. Data:  LuisetReneeandBill.

C. Scriptures. Matthew Chapter 13:36-58. 

II. J. Dwight Pentecost, Th. M., Th. D. 1915-2014; Things To Come

The Course of this Present Age.

p140. The age from the rejection of the Messiah by Israel unto his reception by Israel at His second advent is outlined in two portions of the Word: Matthew 13 and Revelation 2 and 3; the former from the viewpoint of God’s kingdom program, and latter from the viewpoint of the church program.

Matthew 13.

p140. Matt 13 reveals that our Lord is speaking in order that He may give the course of the “mysteries of the kingdom of heaven.” This instruction comes through the proper interpretation of the parables which are recorded here. There are three different basic approaches to this chapter. There are, first of all, those who divorce any prophetic significance from this passage and study it only for its spiritual of moral lessons as it affects believers today. Since they emphasize the unity of God’s purpose from the fall of man until the eternal state, they fail to make any distinction between God’s program for Israel and that for the church and, as a consequence, they see only church truth in this portion…..There are those, in the second place, who, recognizing the distinction between Israel and the church, hold that this portion is totally limited to God’s program for Israel and relegate it to a revelation concerning Israel in the tribulation period when God is preparing them for the coming King…..Then, there are those, in the third place, who believe that this potion of scripture gives a picture of conditions on the earth in respect to the placement of the kingdom program during the time of the King’s absence from the earth. These parables describe the events of the entire inter-advent period. Such is the approach to the passage adopted to this study.

p141. The setting of the chapter in the Gospel. The Gospel of Matthew is the Gospel which presents the Lord Jesus Christ as Yahweh’s King and Israel’s Messiah. This 13th chapter holds a unique place in the development of the theme of the Gospel. Throughout the book, Christ is seen in His presentation as Messiah. In chapters 11-12 we see we see the opposition to the King. In chapter 12, the rejection comes to a climax. Now that Israel has rejected the offered kingdom, the question naturally arises, “What will happen to God’s program, now that the kingdom has been rejected and the Kingdom is to be absent. Since this kingdom was the subject of an irrevocable covenant, it was unthinkable that it could be abandoned. This chapter gives the events in the development of the kingdom program from the time of its rejection until it is received when the nation welcomes the King at His second advent.

p143. The mystery form of the kingdom has reference to the age between the two advents of Christ. The mysteries of the kingdom describes the conditions that prevail on the earth in that interim while the king is absent. These mysteries thus relate this present age to the eternal purposes of God in regard to His kingdom.

III. Charles C. Ryrie. B.A., Th. M., Th. D., Ph. D.. Litt. D., (1925-2016).

Chapter 13 Notes.

13:44-46. The parables of the treasure and pearl indicate the incomparable value of the kingdom, which will cause a man to do everything to possess it. Another possible interpretation equates the man with Christ (as in v. 37) who sacrifices His all to purchase His people.

13:47-50. Similar to the parable of the wheat and tares. Both genuine and professing people will coexist in the kingdom, to be separated at the end of the age.

13:55. “his brothers.” These were the sons of Joseph and Mary subsequent to the birth of Jesus. To understand them as sons of Joseph by a former marriage, or cousins of Jesus, is contrary to the visual sense of “brothers.”

IV. Scofield Reference Bible. C. I. Scofield. D.D., 1843-1921). 

Chapter 13 Notes.

13:45-46. The pearl of great value.

Such, then, is the mystery form of the kingdom. (See Scofield “ :-“) . See Scofield “ :-“. It is the sphere of Christian profession during this age. It is a mingled body of true and false, wheat and tares, good and bad. It is defiled by formalism, doubt, and worldliness. But within it Christ sees the true children of the true kingdom who, at the end, are to “shine forth as the sun.” In the great field, the world, He sees the redeemed of all ages, but especially His hidden Israel, yet to be restored and blessed, Also, in this form of the kingdom, so unlike that which is to be, He sees the Church, His body and bride, and for joy He sells all that He has 2 Corinthians 8:9 and buys the field, the treasure, and the pearl. end of the consummation of the age. Matthew 24:3.

V. John F. Walvoord. A.B., M.A., Th. B., Th. M., Th. D., D.D., Litt. D. (1910-2002).

https://bible.org/users/john-f-walvoordhttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Walvoord  

https://www.thriftbooks.com/a/john-f-walvoord/203232/
(1910-2012) long-time president of Dallas Theological Seminary, was one of the most prominent evangelical scholars of his generation. He is considered perhaps the world’s foremost interpreter of biblical prophecy

The parable of the mustard seed is also found in Mark 4, where it is related to the kingdom of God. This has supported the view of many that the kingdom of God and the kingdom of heaven are identical, as they are occasionally found in parallel passages. There is some indication in Scripture, however, that the kingdom of heaven emphasizes the professing character of the kingdom as including unbelievers who look like believers, as illustrated in the tares, in contrast to the kingdom of God, containing only true believers. It is significant that the kingdom of God is not compared to the second parable, that of the wheat and the tares, as those in the kingdom of God are genuine believers. Putting Matthew and Mark together, the conclusion can be reached that both the number of true believers (the kingdom of God) as well as the sphere of profession in the present age (the kingdom of heaven) will grow rapidly. This is in contrast to the future millennial kingdom, which Christ will bring at His second coming, which will begin abruptly as a worldwide kingdom, rather than as a product of gradual growth.

VI. Dr. Thomas L. Constable., A. B., Th. M. Th. D.

https://faithlife.com/thomas-l-constable/aboutThe Synoptic Problem http://www.godsbreathpublications.com/dr-constable-expository-bible-notes/

Matthew recorded increasing polarization in this section. Jesus expanded His ministry, but as He did so opposition became even more intense. The Jewish leaders became increasingly hostile. Consequently Jesus spent more time preparing His disciples. Jesus revealed Himself more clearly to His disciples, but they only understood some of what He told them. They strongly rejected other things He said. The inevitability of a final confrontation between Jesus and His critics became increasingly clear. The general movement in this section is Jesus withdrawing from Israel’s leaders (Matthew 13:54 to Matthew 16:12) and preparing His disciples for His passion (Matthew 16:13 to Matthew 19:2).

VII.  My Bucket List shows the references that I consult, of theologians and printed resources, whenever I write an article that will be posted. Please find the Pages of my site to find Bucket List.

VIII. My Websites To Follow

https://equippingblog.wordpress.com/ Eternity

https://newsandcommentary38395276.wordpress.com/ Thy Kingdom Come

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Matthew Chapter 13 (1 of 2)

I. Video.  Matthew Chapter 13 (1 of 2)

A. Title. The Parable of the Sower – The Parable of the Weeds – The Parable of the Mustard Seed -The Leaven

B. Data:  LuisetReneeandBill.

C. Scriptures. Matthew Chapter 13:1-35. 

J. Dwight Pentecost, Th. M., Th. D. 1915-2014; Things To Come,  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/J._Dwight_Pentecost

P 109. It can be shown that in all the preaching concerning the kingdom by John (3:2), by Christ (Matt 4:17), by the twelve (Matt 10:5-7), by the seventy (Lk 10:1-12), not once is the kingdom offered to Israel anything but an earthly literal kingdom. Even after the rejection of that offer by Israel, and the announcement of the mystery of the kingdom (Matt 13) Christ anticipates such a literal earthly kingdom (Matt 25:1-13, 31-4 6). The New Testament never relates the kingdom promised to David to Christ’s present session.

P129. Any individual who refers to the Scriptures as the Old and New Testaments bears witness to the fact that God has divided His program into time segments. The history of revelation evidences the progress of divine revelation through successive ages. The dispensational study of the Bible consists in the identification of certain well-defined time periods which are divinely indicated, together with the revealed purpose of God relative to each.

P148. The parable of the mustard and the leaven hidden in meal, then, stress the growth of the inter-advent age (has been called the mystery form of the kingdom). 

P177. It must be borne in mind that the purpose of Matthew 13 is not to divulge the history of the church, but the history of the kingdom in its mystery form. The time is not that of the church — from Pentecost to the rapture — but the entire time from the rejection of Christ to His coming reception. Therefore, it seems to have been a mistake, into which many writers fell, to say that the wheat of the parable represents the church. Rather, the Lord is indicating that during the age there is to be a sowing of the seed (the parable of the sower), and also a counter-sowing (the parable of the tares), and that this condition will continue throughout the age. At the end of the age there will be a separation of those who were the children of the kingdom and those who were the children of the evil one. The tribulation period ends with judgment on all enemies of the King. Thus, every unbeliever is removed. Following these judgments the kingdom is instituted into which the righteous are taken. This is perfectly consistent with the teaching of the parable. 

P464. In the parables (Matt 13:1-50), the Lord outlines the program in the development of the theocratic kingdom during the period of the King’s absence, and announces the inception of an entirely new, unheralded and unexpected program — the church (Matt 16:13-20). He prepares the disciples for a long delay in the kingdom program as it relates to Israel (Lk 19:11-27).He promises the second advent, at which time the kingdom program with Israel will be resumed (Matt 24:27-31), and gives the nation signs that will herald His second advent (Matt 24:4-26). He prepares the disciples for their ministry in the new age (John 14-16), but promises them participation in the kingdom, despite its delay (Matt 19:28-30; Lk 22:28-30). The Lord even gives to the disciples a miniature and premature picture of the second coming of Christ to establish His kingdom (Matt 16:27-17:8). Thus we see that the Lord is preparing the disciples for the withdrawal of the offer of the kingdom and the institution of a new program and age before the kingdom program is consummated.   

P467. Concerning the kingdom program in the present age, that God is continuing the development of his overall theocratic kingdom program  is presented in the parables of Matthew 13. It was entirely unknown in the Old Testament that a great interval of time would intervene between the offer of the kingdom by Messiah at His coming to the earth and the reception of that offer. The parables of Matthew 13 reveal the whole course of the development of the theocratic kingdom from the rejection of the King by Israel during His first advent until His reception as Messiah by Israel at His second advent. In Luke 19:11-27, the whole program is developed. 

III. Charles C. Ryrie. B.A., Th. M., Th. D., Ph. D.. Litt. D., (1925-2016).

Charles Ryrie https://www.amazon.com/Charles-Caldwell-Ryrie/e/B001HMRTWW
Charles Ryrie https://www.moodypublishers.com/authors/r/charles-ryrie/

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Charles_Caldwell_RyrieChapter 13 Notes

13:3.”parables.” A parable is a figure of speech in which a moral or spiritual truth is illustrated by an analogy drawn from everyday experiences. These parables present truths about the kingdom in this present day. These truths are called “mysteries” (v 11) because they were not revealed in the OT, and they are revealed by Christ only to those who are properly related to Him (vv 11-13; Mk 4:11-12). The Jewish leaders’ rejection of Christ reached a climax in the “unpardonable sin” of the previous chapter. Though that rejection would continue and strengthen, Jesus now turns to instructing His disciples about the present dispensation (a mystery, Eph 3:5-6) between the first and second comings of the Lord.

13:4. “birds” represent evil (v 19; Rev 18:20).

13:5 “rocky places.” Shallow soil on top of solid rock.

13:13-15, Those who were rejecting Him would not understand these new truths, as Isaiah predicted (Isa 6:9-10).

13:18-23, The parable teaches that there would be four different responses to the Word: no response, emotional response, worldly response, and fruitful response.

13: 25. “tares.” Weeds, in this case probably darnel, which in the blade resembles wheat but which can be distinguished from wheat when fully ripe. 

13:32. “smaller than all other seeds.” Lit., lesser of all seeds. It is among the smallest seeds and was the smallest used in Israel. The parables are designed to reveal the mysteries of the kingdom, that is, the present age, which will grow quickly. 

V. Scofield Reference Bible. C. I. Scofield. D.D., 1843-1921). 

13:24. This parable Matthew 13:24-30 is also interpreted by our Lord Matthew 13:36-43. Here the “good seed” is not the “word,” as in the first parable Matthew 13:19Matthew 13:23 but rather that which the word has produced. 1 Peter 1:231 Peter 1:23 viz.: the children of the kingdom. These are, providentially Matthew 13:37 “sown,” i.e. scattered, here and there in the “field” of the “world” Matthew 13:38. The “world” here is both geographical and ethnic–the earth-world, and also the world of men. The wheat of God at once becomes the scene of Satan’s activity. Where children of the kingdom are gathered, there “among the wheat” Matthew 13:25Matthew 13:38Matthew 13:39. Satan “sows” “children of the wicked one,” who profess to be children of the kingdom, and in outward ways are so like the true children that only the angels may, in the end, be trusted to separate them Matthew 13:28-30Matthew 13:40-43. So great is Satan’s power of deception that the tares often really suppose themselves to be children of the kingdom Matthew 7:21-23. Many other parables and exhortations have this mingled condition in view (e.g.)

Indeed, it characterizes Matthew from Chapter 13 to the end. The parable of the wheat and tares is not a description of the world, but of that which professes to be the kingdom. Mere unbelievers are never the children of the devil, but only religious unbelievers are so called (cf) Matthew 13:38John 8:38-44Matthew 23:15.

13:30. The gathering of the tares into bundles for burning does not imply immediate judgment. At the end of this age (Matthew 13:40) the tares are set apart for burning, but first the wheat is gathered into the barn. ; John 14:31 Thessalonians 4:14-17.

13:31. The parable of the Mustard Seed prefigures the rapid but unsubstantial growth of the mystery form of the kingdom from an insignificant beginning Acts 1:15Acts 2:411 Corinthians 1:26 to a great place in the earth. The figure of the fowls finding shelter in the branches is drawn from Daniel 4:20-22. How insecure was such a refuge the context in Daniel shows. kingdom (See Scofield “Daniel 4:20-27.4.22- :“) .

13:33 (1) Leaven, as a symbolic or typical substance, is always mentioned in the O.T. in an evil sense Genesis 19:3Genesis 19:3 (See Scofield “Genesis 19:3- :“) .

(2) The use of the word in the N.T. explains its symbolic meaning. It is “malice and wickedness,” as contrasted with “sincerity and truth” 1 Corinthians 5:6-81 Corinthians 5:6-8 it is evil doctrine Matthew 16:12 in its three-fold form of Pharisasism, Sadduceeism, Herodianism ; Matthew 16:6Mark 8:15. The leaven of the Pharisees was externalism in religion. Matthew 23:14Matthew 23:16Matthew 23:23-28 of the Sadducees, scepticism as to the supernatural and as to the Scriptures Matthew 22:23Matthew 22:29 of the Herodians, worldliness–a Herod party amongst the Jews ; Matthew 22:16-21Mark 3:6.

(3) The use of the word in Matthew 13:33 is congruent with its universal meaning. 

VI. John F. Walvoord. A.B., M.A., Th. B., Th. M., Th. D., D.D., Litt. D. (1910-2002).

https://bible.org/users/john-f-walvoordhttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Walvoord  

https://www.thriftbooks.com/a/john-f-walvoord/203232/
(1910-2012) long-time president of Dallas Theological Seminary, was one of the most prominent evangelical scholars of his generation. He is considered perhaps the world’s foremost interpreter of biblical prophecy

The thirteenth chapter of Matthew marks a new division in the gospel, in which Jesus addresses Himself to the problem of what will occur when He goes back to heaven as the rejected King. The gospel of Matthew began with the proofs that Jesus was indeed the promised Son who would reign on the throne of David (chap. 1), supported by the visit of the wise men and the early ministry of John the Baptist (chaps. 2-3). After His temptation, Jesus presented the principles of His coming kingdom in the Sermon on the Mount (chaps. 5-7), emphasizing spiritual and moral principles that govern the kingdom of God, but especially as these applied to the prophesied kingdom on earth, which the Messiah-King was to bring when He came. The Sermon on the Mount accordingly contained timeless truths always applicable, some truths that were immediately applicable to Christ’s day on earth, and some truths that were to have their fulfillment in the millennial kingdom.

VII. Summary. As you read through the verses and notes of Matthew 13, it will be clear that Jesus was speaking to Jews, and that none of the verses, or Old Testament reference verses, apply to Gentiles. This inter-advent age, which spans the period of time from the first advent of Christ to His second advent. This time period is also the time period in which we are living. To put all of this together, the parables that are found in Matthew 13 represent the spiritual conditions of the present age while the kingdom remains in a state of postponement. These parables, when collectively considered, reveal the coexistence of both good and evil during the inter-advent age. Thus, during this age, both Satan and God will be at work. However, God’s work notwithstanding, the present age should not be confused with what the Old Testament reveals concerning the Messianic Kingdom. Neither should this divine activity be category as a “mystery form of the kingdom”

VIII.  My Bucket List shows the references that I consult, of theologians and printed resources, whenever I write an article that will be posted. Please find the Pages of my site to find Bucket List.

IX. My Websites To Follow

https://equippingblog.wordpress.com/ Eternity

https://newsandcommentary38395276.wordpress.com/ Thy Kingdom Come

Mathew Chapter 12 (2 of 2)

I. Video.  Matthew Chapter 12 (2 of 2)

A. Title. The Sign of Jonah – Jesus’ Mother and Brothers

B. Data:  LuisetReneeandBill.

C. Scriptures. Matthew 12:38-50. 

J. Dwight Pentecost, Th. M., Th. D. 1915-2014; Things To Come https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/J._Dwight_Pentecost


12:45: The word “dwell” used here is a strong word. It is used to describe the fulness of the Godhead that dwelt in Christ (Col 2:9); it is used of Christ’s taking up a permanent abode in the believer’s heart (Eph 3:17), and of demons returning to take absolute possession of a man (Matt 12:45). It is to be distinguished from the general term for “dwell” which has the the idea of transitoriness, “to sojourn.” p 197

12:46-50. Now that Israel has rejected the offered kingdom, the question naturally arises, “what will happen to God’s kingdom program now that the kingdom has been rejected and the King is to be absent?” Since the kingdom was the subject of an irrevocable covenant it was unthinkable that it could be abandoned. The chapter gives the events in the development of the kingdom program from the time of its rejection until it is received when the nation welcomes the King at His second advent. pp 141-142

12:46:50. Because the nation (Israel) had rejected Him, the Lord announces the severance of every natural tie by which He was bound to the nation. From this announcement of the Lord concerning the rejection of the nation a definite movement may be traced in the withdrawal of the offer of the kingdom. pp 463-464.

III. Charles C. Ryrie. B.A., Th. M., Th. D., Ph. D.. Litt. D., (1925-2016).

https://www.amazon.com/Charles-Caldwell-Ryrie/e/B001HMRTWW
https://www.moodypublishers.com/authors/r/charles-ryrie/

Chapter 12 Notes

12:39. “adulterous.” The nation was unfaithful in its vows to the Lord. “the sign of Jonah the prophet.” In 16:4 and Luke 11:29-32 the sign in the warning of judgment to come (cf. Jonah 1:2; 3:4). Here the sign is related to the death and resurrection of the Son of Man.

12:40. “three days and three nights.” This phrase does not necessarily require that 72 hours elapse between Christ’s death and resurrection, for the Jews reckoned part of a day to be part of a day to be a whole day. Thus, this prophecy can be properly fulfilled if the crucifixion occurred on Friday. However, the statement does require an historical Jonah who was actually swallowed by a great fish.

12:41. “something greater.” The greek word is neuter here and in vs 42, and refers to the kingdom of God. 

12:42. Just as the pagan “Queen” of sheba acknowledged the superiority of Solomon’s wisdom, so the Pharisees should recognize that the kingdom of God was a hand.

12:43-45, “unclean spirit” = a demon. (see note on 7:22). Self-reformation, without spiritual conversion, can lead to serious ramifications. Notice that some demons are more wicked than others, and they can repossess a person from whom they have been cast out.

12:50. This means that the spiritual relation between Christ and believers is closer than the closest of blood ties. Obedience to God takes precedence over responsibilities to family.

IV. Scofield Reference Bible. C. I. Scofield. D.D., 1843-1921). 

Scofield produced several major theological works. First, he wrote a book called Rightly Dividing the Word of Truth, which expresses the principles of dispensational hermeneutics. Second, his annotated reference Bible became the standard for a generation. Finally, his Bible correspondence course made his teaching readily available around the world. All three of these works are still available today. Scofield’s impact has been magnified by his influence on Lewis Sperry Chafer, who founded Dallas Theological Seminary. DTS became the most prominent dispensational seminary in the world; its many high-profile graduates include Chuck Swindoll, Tony Evans, David Jeremiah, J. Vernon McGee, Hal Lindsey, Bruce Wilkinson, Alva J. Mc Clain, Charles L. Feinberg, John F. Walvoord, and other highly esteemed theologians.

12:46. Rejected by Israel, those of His own race (compare Rom 9:3) our Lord intimates the formation of the new family of faith which will overstep the racial claims that Israel has known to this time and will receive all those “(whoever,” v 50 also who will be His disciples. Compare Jn 6:28-29).

V. John F. Walvoord. A.B., M.A., Th. B., Th. M., Th. D., D.D., Litt. D. (1910-2002).

https://bible.org/users/john-f-walvoordhttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Walvoord  

https://www.thriftbooks.com/a/john-f-walvoord/203232/
(1910-2012) long-time president of Dallas Theological Seminary, was one of the most prominent evangelical scholars of his generation. He is considered perhaps the world’s foremost interpreter of biblical prophecy.

12:38-46.

Having been challenged to face the evidence that Jesus was indeed who He claimed to be, the unbelieving Pharisees and scribes asked for a particular sign. Jesus recited the experience of Jonah, how he was three days and three nights in the great fish. Jesus described this as a prophetic incident, anticipating that the Son of Man will be three days and three nights in the heart of the earth. Jesus was predicting his death and resurrection would be the supreme sign for those seeking evidence of His claims. The use by Jesus of the prophet Jonah as the only sign these unbelievers would have, brings this interesting observation. 

The Ninevites did not witness the rescuscitation of Jonah for themselves: indeed, there is no evidence he even recounted it to them (Jonah 3:1-4;) The Ninevites experienced the effects of a divine sign they never recognized, and this may be Matthew’s point: the Ninevites repented without recognizing a sign, whereas the opponents of Jesus were too hardhearted to repent despite the signs that he had been giving them….All the Ninevites needed was the preaching of Jonah of the truth, yet Jesus was greater than Jonah (12:41).

VI. Summary. The notes on 12:38-41 are key to understanding this passage of scripture, especially in relation to “3 days and 3 nights.”

VII.  My Bucket List shows the references that I consult, of theologians and printed resources, whenever I write an article that will be posted. Please find the Pages of my site to find Bucket List.

VIII. My Websites To Follow

https://equippingblog.wordpress.com/ Eternity

https://untotheleastofthese.home.blog/ Book Prep

https://newsandcommentary38395276.wordpress.com/ Thy Kingdom Come

Matthew Chapter 12 (1 of 2)

I. Video.  Matthew Chapter 12 (1 of 2)

A. Title. Lord of the Sabbath – God’s Chosen Servant – Jesus and Beelzebub

B. Data:  LuisetReneeandBill.

C. Scriptures: Matthew 12:1-37.

II. Dr. Thomas L.Constable., A. B., Th. M. Th. D.(Notes on Matthew)

https://faithlife.com/thomas-l-constable/aboutThe Synoptic Problem http://www.godsbreathpublications.com/dr-constable-expository-bible-notes/

WRITER 

External evidence strongly supports the Matthean authorship of the first Gospel. The earliest copies of the Gospel we have begin: “KATA MATTHAION” (“according to Matthew”). Several early church fathers referred to Matthew (whose name means “Gift of God” or “Faithful”) as the writer, including: Clement of Rome, Polycarp, Justin Martyr, Clement of Alexandria, Tertullian, and Origen.Papias’ use of the term logia to describe Matthew’s work, cited above, is not clear evidence of Matthean authorship of the first Gospel. Since Matthew was a disciple of Jesus and one of the 12 Apostles, his work carried great influence and enjoyed much prestige from its first appearance. We might expect a more prominent disciple, such as Peter or James, to have written it. The fact that the early church accepted it as from Matthew further strengthens the likelihood that he indeed wrote it.

Internal evidence of Matthean authorship is also strong. As a tax collector for Rome, Matthew would have had to be able to write capably, he would have been a note-taker and preserver (unlike Jews of his time in general), and he probably knew shorthand. His profession forced him to keep accurate and detailed records, which skill he put to good use in composing his Gospel. There are more references to money—and to more different kinds of money—in this Gospel, than in any of the others. It has been estimated that about one-fifth of Jesus’ teachings dealt with money matters. Matthew humbly referred to himself as a tax collector, a profession with objectionable connotations in his culture, whereas the other Gospel writers simply called him Matthew (or Levi). Matthew modestly called his feast for Jesus “dining” (Matt. 9:9-10), but Luke referred to it as “a big reception” (Luke 5:29). All these details confirm the testimony of the early church fathers.

According to tradition, Matthew ministered in Israel for several years after Jesus’ ascension to heaven. He also made missionary journeys to the Jews who lived among the Gentiles outside Israel, Diaspora Jews. There is evidence that he visited Persia, Ethiopia, Syria, and Greece.

“It was no ordinary man who wrote a Gospel which Renan, the French critic, eighteen hundred years later, could call the most important book in the world. How many of our current best sellers will still be leading human thought in A.D. 3600?”

III. Charles C. Ryrie. B.A., Th. M., Th. D., Ph. D.. Litt. D., (1925-2016).

https://www.amazon.com/Charles-Caldwell-Ryrie/e/B001HMRTWW
https://www.moodypublishers.com/authors/r/charles-ryrie/

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Charles_Caldwell_Ryrie

Chapter 12 Notes

12:2. “not lawful to do on a Sabbath.” It was lawful for persons to pick grain from another’s field to satisfy hunger (Deu 23:25) but not to do regular work on the Sabbath (Ex 20:10). The latter was the charge of the Pharisees.

12:3. “what David did.”(See 1 Sam 21:1-6).

12:4. “;the consecrated bread.” Better, bread of the Presence. Twelve cakes, made of fine flour, were placed in the Holy Place in the Tabernacle each day on the table that stood opposite the lampstand. The old bread was eaten by the priests. It was this bread that David requested of Ahimelech, the priest, for himself and his men.

12:5. Priests who work on the Sabbath were not blamed.

12:7. Showing mercy is more pleasing to God than external conformity to the law.

12:16. “not to tell who He was.” Many were drawn to Christ because of His reputation as a healer, which may have been diverting attention from His primary role as Messiah.

12:18-21. For the OT quote, see Isa 42:1-4. Here is one of Matthew’s descriptive gems, highlighting the graciousness and gentleness of Jesus.

12:31: “blasphemy against the Spirit.” Technically, according to the scribes, involved direct and explicit abuse of the divine name. Jesus, here, teaches that it also may be the reviling of God by attributing the Spirit’s work to Satan. The special circumstances involved in this blasphemy can not be duplicated today; therefore, this sin can not be committed. Jesus exhorted the Pharisees to turn and be justified (vs 33, 37 ).

12:36. “careless = useless. 

IV. Scofield Reference Bible. C. I. Scofield. D.D., 1843-1921). 

Scofield produced several major theological works. First, he wrote a book called Rightly Dividing the Word of Truth, which expresses the principles of dispensational hermeneutics. Second, his annotated reference Bible became the standard for a generation. Finally, his Bible correspondence course made his teaching readily available around the world. All three of these works are still available today. Scofield’s impact has been magnified by his influence on Lewis Sperry Chafer, who founded Dallas Theological Seminary. DTS became the most prominent dispensational seminary in the world; its many high-profile graduates include Chuck Swindoll, Tony Evans, David Jeremiah, J. Vernon McGee, Hal Lindsey, and Bruce Wilkinson.
Notes provided by editorial revision committee, including: Charles L. Feinberg, Th. D., Ph. D. (1909-1995)  and John F. Walvoord. A.B., M.A., Th. B., Th. M., Th. D., D.D., Litt. D. (1910-2002).

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Charles_L._Feinberg.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Walvoord

12:18. “Gentiles.”  The rejected King of Israel will turn to the Gentiles (Contrast Mt 10:5-6) In fulfillment this awaited the official rejection ,and the crucifixion and resurrection of Christ (Lk 24:46-48;Acts 9:15; 13:46; 28; 25-28; Rom 11:11).

12:31. Anyone who is concerned about his rejection of Christ has, obviously, not committed the “unpardonable sin,” and can still come to Christ.

V. John F. Walvoord. A.B., M.A., Th. B., Th. M., Th. D., D.D., Litt. D. (1910-2002).

https://bible.org/users/john-f-walvoordhttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Walvoord  

https://www.thriftbooks.com/a/john-f-walvoord/203232/


John Walvoord, long-time president of Dallas Theological Seminary, was one of the most prominent evangelical scholars of his generation. He is considered perhaps the world’s foremost interpreter of biblical prophecy.

Pharisees Accuse Jesus Of Healing by Demonic Power (12:22-37).

Following the many miracles already recorded, an outstanding case of need was presented to the crowd in one who was demon possessed and both blind and dumb. Such a pitiful person should have aroused the sympathy even of the Pharisees. When Jesus, with amazing power, healed him so that he could both speak and see, and by inference cast out the demon, it brought amazement to the people, and they said, “Is not this the son of David?” (v. 23).

The Pharisees countered by accusing Him of casting out demons by Beelzebub, the prince of demons. Beelzebub was actually a heathen deity, referred to earlier by Jesus in Matthew 10:25, and one supposedly in authority over the demons.

Jesus answered the Pharisees by showing the illogic of their statement. He pointed out that this would be a kingdom divided against itself. It would be Satan casting out Satan. If the casting out of demons is by Beelzebub, then by whom did the Pharisees who were exorcists cast out demons? The point was that only the power of God or someone under the power of God could accomplish this.

Jesus then drove home His point. If demons have been actually cast out, then it must have been by the Spirit of God, and then, in the person of Christ, the kingdom of God had come unto them. One could not enter the demonic realm victoriously unless he first had bound the strong man (v. 29). The Pharisees had to make a choice. They were either with Jesus or against Him. But if they were against Him, they were guilty of blasphemy against the Holy Spirit, a sin which by its nature is not forgiven (vv. 31-32).

There has been much misunderstanding about blasphemy against the Holy Spirit. Here it is properly defined as attributing to Satan what is accomplished by the power of God. Such a sin is not unpardonable in itself, but rather because it rejects the person and work of the Holy Spirit, without whom repentance and restoration are impossible. As far as it applies today, it is not the thought that one seeking pardon will not find it, but rather that one who rejects the Holy Spirit will not seek pardon. It is the ultimate in unbelief. In verse 33, He points out that a good tree brings forth good fruit and a bad tree brings forth bad fruit. They must judge Him on the basis of His works.

The unbelief of the Pharisees calls forth the strongest language. Christ addressed them, “generation of vipers,” or poisonous snakes. He declared that they were evil and therefore could not speak good and warned them that as unbelievers, every idle word they speak will be called to account on the day of judgment. He concluded in Matthew 12:37, “For by thy words thou shalt be justified, and by thy words thou shalt be condemned.” This was addressed to the unsaved Pharisees, not to Christians who were justified by faith and whose sins had been forgiven.

VI. Summary.

As has been the case with the prior chapters of this study, this chapter continues to show that the subjects of the Gospel of Matthew are the Jews of the nation of Israel. The verses in which Christ offers for reference would have been known to Jews, but not to Gentiles. Jesus makes a comment in reference to the Gentiles, which is found in 12:18, 21, but was not directed to any Gentile. In 12:31,32, we come across a passage that many believers understand as being “the unpardonable sin.” But, the unpardonable sin is that of “unbelief,” which is addressed in the Gospel of John, in 3:16-18. The unpardonable sin, which is stated as being “the sin of the world” is that which Jesus resolves as is written in John 1:29. The sins that are stated in Matthew relate to the Jews, and their disobedience to the Law. Jesus, in offering the Kingdom to Israel, is saying to Jews, ” I am offering the Kingdom to you; now, you should act like Kingdom people. Jews could have been guilty of theft, but that sin would not have prevented them having eternal life with Jesus. The sin of unbelief is a sin that is unpardonable, but can easily be resolved, “by belief in Christ.”

VII.  My Bucket List shows the references that I consult, of theologians and printed resources, whenever I write an article that will be posted. Please find the Pages of my site to find Bucket List.

VIII. My Websites To Follow

https://equippingblog.wordpress.com/ Eternity

https://untotheleastofthese.home.blog/ Book Prep

https://newsandcommentary38395276.wordpress.com/ Thy Kingdom Come

Matthew Chapter 11 (Jesus and John the Baptist – Woe on Unrepentant Cities – Rest for the Weary)

I. Video.  Matthew Chapter 11

A. Title. Jesus and John the Baptist – Woe on Unrepentant Cities – Rest for the Weary

B. Data:  LuisetReneeandBill.

II. Dr. Thomas L.Constable., A. B., Th. M. Th. D.(Notes on Matthew)

https://faithlife.com/thomas-l-constable/aboutThe Synoptic Problem http://www.godsbreathpublications.com/dr-constable-expository-bible-notes/

Genre 

Genre refers to the type of literature that a particular document fits within. Certain types of literature have features that affect their interpretation. For example, we interpret letters differently than poems. So it is important to identify the genre or genres of a book of the Bible.

The Gospels are probably more like ancient Greco-Roman biographies than any other type of literature. This category is quite broad and encompasses works of considerable diversity, including the Gospels. Even Luke, with its characteristic historiographic (written history) connections to Acts, qualifies as ancient biography. Unlike this genre, however, the Gospels “combine teaching and action in a preaching-oriented work that stands apart from anything else in the ancient world.” The Gospels also are anonymous, in the sense that the writers did not identify themselves as the writers, as Paul did in his epistles, for example. And they are not as pretentious as most ancient biographies. The word “gospel,” by the way, comes from the old Saxon God’s spell or word.

III. Charles C. Ryrie. B.A., Th. M., Th. D., Ph. D.. Litt. D., (1925-2016).

https://www.amazon.com/Charles-Caldwell-Ryrie/e/B001HMRTWW
https://www.moodypublishers.com/authors/r/charles-ryrie/https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Charles_Caldwell_Ryrie

Chapter 11 Notes

11:2-5. To encourage John the Baptist, the Lord sent a reminder of the miracles that he was doing. The OT predicted that Messiah would give sight to the blind (Isa 29:18), and there are more recorded miracles of our Lord’s doing this than any other kind. This alone should have assured John that Jesus was indeed the Messiah.

11:6. “who does not take offense at Me.” I.e., he who can in full faith acknowledge and accept My “mighty work” (vs 20) as evidence of My messiahship.

11:7-8. These are rhetorical questions expecting negative answers.

11:10. “about whom it was written.” See Isa 40:3 and Mal 3:1.

11:14. “John himself is Elijah.” Jesus is saying that if the Jews had received Him, they would also have understood that John fulfilled the OT prediction of the coming of Elijah before the Day of the Lord (Mal 4:5).. Note on 17:11-12..The sequence of thought is as follows: (1) Elijah is coming as the restorer (Mal 4:5); he came, unrecognized, in the person of John the Baptist, and was killed; (3) the Son of Man faces a like fate. The disciples seem to grasp only the first two points.

11:18-19. The people were rejecting both John’s and Jesus’s ministries even though their styles were exactly opposite. Eventually the “wisdom” of both would be justified.

11:28-30. In contrast to the teaching of the scribes, Jesus’s “yoke” is easy 

IV. Scofield Reference Bible. C. I. Scofield. D.D., 1843-1921). 

Scofield produced several major theological works. First, he wrote a book called Rightly Dividing the Word of Truth, which expresses the principles of dispensational hermeneutics. Second, his annotated reference Bible became the standard for a generation. Finally, his Bible correspondence course made his teaching readily available around the world. All three of these works are still available today. Scofield’s impact has been magnified by his influence on Lewis Sperry Chafer, who founded Dallas Theological Seminary. DTS became the most prominent dispensational seminary in the world; its many high-profile graduates include Chuck Swindoll, Tony Evans, David Jeremiah, J. Vernon McGee, Hal Lindsey, and Bruce Wilkinson.


Matthew Chapter 11 notes provided by editorial revision committee, including:

Charles L. Feinberg, Th. D., Ph. D., 1909-1995;  

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Charles_L._Feinberg

John F. Walvoord. Th. M., Th. D., 1910-2020;

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Walvoord

11:2. John is in prison; the King is rejected, and John’s faith waivers. So the Lord encourages and exhorts His servants (vv 4-6). 

11:11. “greater than he.” Positionally greater, not morally. John the Baptist was as great, in strength and character, as any man “born of women” but, as to the kingdom, his ministry was to announce that it was at hand. The kingdom did not then come, but was rejected, and John was martyred and the King subsequently crucified. The least in the kingdom (Lk 1:31;33), when it is set up in Glory will be greater than John in the fullness of the Lord’s power and glory. It is not heaven which is in question, but Messiah’s earthly kingdom (Matt 3:2).

11:12. “by force.” It has been much disputed whether the violence (force) here is external, as against the kingdom in the persons of John the Baptist and Jesus; or that considering the opposition of the scribes and Pharisees, only the violently resolute would press into it. Both things are true. The King and His herald  suffered violence, and this is the primary and greater meaning; but also, some were resolutely becoming disciples.

11:20-24. The kingdom of heaven, announced as at hand by John the Baptist, the King Himself, and by the Twelve, and attested by mighty works, has been morally rejected. The places chosen for the testing of the nation, Chorazin, Bethsaida, etc., having rejected both John and Jesus, the rejected King, now speaks of Judgment; with these cities today are just ruins, but other cities in the region are still bustling towns. “Sodom, burning.” A city located in the valley of Sidim known for its extreme wickedness and destroyed by God with fire and brimstone. Only Lot and his family survived the destruction. The official rejection was later (Mt 27:21-25). 

11:28. The new message of Jesus. The rejected King now turns from the rejecting nation and offers, not the kingdom but rest and service to all who are in conscious need of His help. It is a pivotal point in the ministry of Jesus. 

V. J. Dwight Pentecost, Th. M., Th., D. 1915=2014. pg 413 Things To Come.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/J._Dwight_Pentecost

Matthew 11:21-24

The Judgment On The Nation Israel. The Scriptures teach that the future judgment program will begin with a judgment on the nation Israel. To them, which was promised, through the covenants, a kingdom over which the Messiah, David’s son, should reign. Before this kingdom can be instituted at His personal return to the earth, there must be a judgment on Israel to determine those that will enter into this kingdom, for it is clearly revealed that “they are not all Israel which are of Israel (Romans 9:6; Zechariah 12:10-14; Zechariah 14:4; Matthew 25:1-30). 

VI. Summary.

It should be kept in mind that the Gospels of Matthew, Mark and Luke, relate to the offer of the kingdom to Israel, and not to personal salvation. The Gospel of John (John 3:16) is written to show the offer of personal salvation to all of the world, at the hands of followers of Jesus (Matthew 28:18-19; Acts 1:8). The disciples were still looking for the kingdom to come, even until the ascension of Jesus to Heaven (Acts 1:8-9), but He told them that it was not the time for such an event to occur (Acts 1:6).

VII.  My Bucket List shows the references that I consult, of theologians and printed resources, whenever I write an article that will be posted. Please find the Pages of my site to find Bucket List.

VIII. My Websites To Follow

https://equippingblog.wordpress.com/ Eternity

https://untotheleastofthese.home.blog/ Book Prep

https://newsandcommentary38395276.wordpress.com/ Thy Kingdom Come

Matthew – Chapter 10

I. Video.  Matthew Chapter 10

A. Title. Jesus Sends Out the Twelve

B. Data:  LuisetReneeandBill.

II. Dr. Thomas L.Constable., A. B., Th. M. Th. D.(Notes on Matthew)

https://faithlife.com/thomas-l-constable/about

The Synoptic Problem

http://www.godsbreathpublications.com/dr-constable-expository-bible-notes/

In 1776 and 1779, two posthumously published essays by A. E. Lessing became known, in which he argued for a single written source for the Synoptic Gospels. He called this source the Gospel of the Nazarenes, and he believed its writer had composed it in the Aramaic language. To him, one original source best explained the parallels and differences between the Synoptics. This idea of an original source or primal Gospel caught the interest of many other scholars. Some of them believed there was a written source, but others held that it was an oral source.

As one might expect, the idea of two or more sources occurred to some scholars as the best solution to the synoptic problem (e.g., H. J. Holtzmann and B. H. Streeter). Some favored the view that Mark was one of the primal sources because over 90 percent of the material in Mark also appears in Matthew and/or Luke. Some proposed another primary source, “Q,” an abbreviation of the German word for source: quelle. It supposedly contained the material in Matthew and Luke that does not appear in Mark.

Gradually, source criticism gave way to “form criticism.” The “form critics” concentrated on the process involved in transmitting what Jesus said and did to the primary sources. They assumed that the process of transmitting this information followed patterns of oral communication that are typical in primitive societies. Prominent New Testament form critics include K. L. Schmidt, Martin Dibelius, and Rudoph Bultmann. Typically, oral communication has certain characteristic effects on stories: It tends to shorten narratives, to retain names, to balance teaching, and to elaborate on stories about miracles, to name a few results.

The critics also adopted other criteria from secular philology (the study of language and languages) to assess the accuracy of statements in the Gospels. For example, they viewed as distinctive to Jesus only what was dissimilar to what Palestinian Jews or early Christians might have said. Given the critics’ view of inspiration, it is easy to see how most of them concluded that the Gospels, in their present form, do not accurately represent what Jesus said and did. However, some conservative scholars have used the same literary method but held a much higher view of the Gospel: for example, Vincent Taylor, who wrote The Gospel According to St. Mark.

III. Charles C. Ryrie. B.A., Th. M., Th. D., Ph. D.. Litt. D., (1925-2016).

https://www.amazon.com/Charles-Caldwell-Ryrie/e/B001HMRTWW
https://www.moodypublishers.com/authors/r/charles-ryrie/https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Charles_Caldwell_Ryrie

Chapter 10 Notes.

10:1. “disciples.” A disciple is one who is taught by another; he is a learner. 

10:2 . “apostles.” The word “apostle” means “one sent forth” as an ambassador who bears a message and who represents the one who sent him. The qualifications included (1) seeing the Lord and being an eyewitness of His resurrection (Acts 1;22: 1 Cor 9:1), (2) being invested with miraculous sign-gifts (Acts 5:15-16; Heb 2:3-4), and being chosen by the Lord and the Holy Spirit (vv. 1:2; Acts 1:26).

10:5-8. This “Great Commission” was limited to going to Jewish people. Not even Samaritans (mixed race of Jews and Gentiles who intermarried after the Assyrian conquest of Israel in 722 B.C.) were included, because the Jews had to prepare spiritually for the cominng messianic, earthly kingdom first. After their rejection of the King, the commission given to the same group was to go to Gentiles (28:18-19). The disciples’ ministry would be accompanied by miraculous signs (v. 8).

10:21-23. These verses are a prediction of persecution in the Tribulation before the second coming of Christ (24:9-14).

10:32-33. The restoration of Israel to the Kingdom is based on their acceptance of Jesus as God’s chosen King (Deu 17:15; Mt 23:39). Individual salvation in the Church age is based on John 3:16. Vs. 32-33 relate to the individual salvation of Jews at the end of the Tribulation (John 19:37; Zech 12:10).

IV. John F. Walvoord. A.B., M.A. Th. B., Th.M., Th. D., D.D., Litt. D. (1910-2002).

https://bible.org/users/john-f-walvoordhttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Walvoord  

https://www.thriftbooks.com/a/john-f-walvoord/203232/
(1910-2012) long-time president of Dallas Theological Seminary, was one of the most prominent evangelical scholars of his generation. He is considered perhaps the world’s foremost interpreter of biblical prophecy

The Twelve Apostles Commissioned

Twelve Apostles Named and Given Authority, 10:1-6

In connection with Christ’s commissioning the twelve disciples to preach, accompanied by power to cast out unclean spirits and to heal disease, Matthew names the twelve apostles in pairs (cf. Mk 3:16-19Lk 6:13-16Ac 1:13), unlike the other gospels, possibly indicating that they were sent forth in pairs54 (cf. Mk 6:7). There are small variations in order and in the names given to the disciples in each of the gospels. Only Matthew describes himself as a tax collector, and there are variations in the name of Lebbaeus, surnamed Thaddaeus, whom Luke calls Judas, the brother of James, to distinguish him from Judas Iscariot. Those named as apostles are commissioned and sent forth to perform a ministry on behalf of God.

Apostles Sent Only to Israel, 10:6-23

The discourse in which Christ commissions the twelve has been considered by some interpretaters as a collection of sayings spoken by Christ on many different occasions. As presented by Matthew, however, it is represented as a single discourse, and there is no valid reason for questioning this presentation. Obviously, Christ repeated many of His instructions at different times and in different places, and that there should be similarity to some statements here is not surprising.

The instruction given by Christ to the twelve was to go “to the lost sheep of the house of Israel,” and not go to the Gentiles or the Samaritans (cf. Mk 6:7-13Lk 9:1-6). His first and primary obligation was to deliver the message of the kingdom to Israel, and neither time nor personnel would permit reaching the others. Later, the gospel was to go to every creature. The apostles were given authority to perform miracles, even to raising the dead. While they seem to have been successful in casting out demons and curing all diseases, there is no record that any dead were raised at this time.

Luke records a sending out of seventy disciples, apparently subsequent to the sending of the twelve, or in addition to them (Lk 10:1). The seventy also report success in casting out demons (v. 17). Matthew does not refer to the seventy, but their instructions were similar to those given to the twelve.

In sending them forth, Jesus instructed them not to take provisions of money or clothing and to depend upon the cities in which they preached to provide for them. If they were not welcomed in a particular place, they were to shake off the dust of their feet against it and to pronounce a solemn judgment that it would be more tolerable for the land of Sodom and Gomorrah in the day of judgment than for that city.

The disciples’ task was to be a difficult one, as they would be as sheep in the midst of wolves, but their demeanor should be that of being wise as serpents and harmless as doves. They were to beware of men who might deliver them to the Sanhedrin, but if they were brought before governors and kings, they were not to be filled with care but to rely on God to enable them to speak in that hour. Jesus predicted that ultimately there would be persecution, with brother delivering brother to death, father the child, and children their parents, and they would be hated of all men. It is apparent that these prophecies go beyond their immediate experience and were to be fulfilled after Pentecost. Jesus declared they would not be able to fulfill their tasks of reaching all the cities of Israel until the Son of man had come. This seems to anticipate the second coming of Christ, and views the entire present church age as a parenthesis not taken into consideration in this prophecy.

Cost and Reward of Discipleship, 10:24-42

Continuing His instructions to the twelve, beginning in Matthew 10:24, Jesus discussed the whole matter of discipleship and its reward, including material that extended far beyond the disciples’ immediate situation. Having introduced the thought that discipleship extends until the Son of man returns, He gave instructions covering the whole period. Jesus reminded them that if He, their Master, was called Beelzebub, it is understandable that men would similarly abuse His followers. Beelzebub was the name of a god of the Philistines (2 Ki 1:2), also known as Baal, which the Jews equated with the devil, or Satan.

Jesus instructed His disciples not to fear name-calling. The time would come when truth would be fully revealed and darkness and unbelief condemned. They were not to fear those who could kill the body but not kill the soul, but rather fear the one able to destroy both soul and body in hell. Although God alone has the power of death, the reference here is to Satan, whose activities ultimately result in the destruction of both soul and body.

The disciples were assured of the care of the Father. If two sparrows were worth a farthing, or one-fourth of a cent (equal to about twenty-five cents today), and a sparrow could not fall to the ground without the Father’s permission, they could be assured that they were more valuable than many sparrows and that the very hairs of their head were numbered. Jesus promised them that if they confess Him before men, He will confess them before God the Father; but if they deny Him, they will be denied before God the Father.

Jesus told them bluntly, however, that His purpose was not to bring peace on earth, but rather a sword. A son would be set against his father, a daughter against her mother, and the daughter-in-law against her mother-in-law. A man’s foes would be those of his own household.

In stating that He had not come to bring peace among men, Jesus was referring to His first coming and the result of the proclamation of the gospel of the kingdom. He would be a divider of men. Ultimately, however, He was to bring peace and good will among men, as the angels announced at His birth (Lk 2:14). The Scriptures define many kinds of peace, such as peace with God (Ro 5:1), possessed by every Christian; the peace of God (Phil 4:7), which is a fruit of the Spirit (Gal 5:22); and the promise of peace on earth to be realized in the future millennial reign of Christ, as in Isaiah 11. The Scriptures make plain that there is no peace for the wicked (Is 57:21). Peace is only possible for those who are the recipients of the grace of God by faith.

Disciples accordingly must choose between love of Christ and of the family. Although normally, children should love their father and mother, they are not to love them more than they love Jesus. While parents should love their children, they should not love them more than they love Christ. A true disciple must take up his cross and follow after Jesus. In losing his life for Christ’s sake, he shall find it. Not only disciples, but those who receive a disciple in Christ’s name will receive their reward. Even a cup of cold water given in the name of a disciple will be rewarded in God’s time. The words of Jesus, applicable to the twelve as they went forth, have echoed down through the centuries since, and have encouraged brave men and women to be true even unto death.

V. Summary.

It is important to remember that the activity of these verses show Jesus interacting with Jews, and not Gentiles; vs 5. “Do not go in the way of the Gentiles and do not enter any city of the Samaritans”; vs. 6 “go the lost sheep of the house of Israel.” vs.  15, “judgment will be for Jews and Gentiles after the end of the Tribulation (25:31-46; 41&46; Rev 20:10, 15).

VI.  My Bucket List shows the references that I consult, of theologians and printed resources, whenever I write an article that will be posted. Please find the Pages of my site to find Bucket List.

VII. My Websites To Follow

https://equippingblog.wordpress.com/ Eternity

https://untotheleastofthese.home.blog/ Book Prep

https://newsandcommentary38395276.wordpress.com/ Thy Kingdom ComeH

Matthew – Chapter 9:18-38 (2 of 2)

I. Video.  Matthew Chapter 9 vs 18-38 

A. Title. A Dead Girl and a Sick Woman – Jesus Heals the Blind and Mute – The Workers Are Few

B. Data:  LuisetReneeandBill.

II. Thomas L. Constable., A. B., Th. M. Th. D.(Notes on Matthew).

https://faithlife.com/thomas-l-constable/aboutThe Synoptic Problem http://www.godsbreathpublications.com/dr-constables-expository-bible-notes/


All four of the Gospels are selective accounts of the life and work of Jesus Christ, whose “career was destined to change the history of the world more profoundly than that of any other single individual who ever lived.”

“The Gospels are the most important part of Holy Scripture because all that preceded them led up to them, and all that follows emerges from them. If the revelation of the Gospels were to be removed, the Old Testament would be an enigma, and the remainder of the New Testament would never have been written. These two parts of the Bible, comprising sixty-two of its sixty-six Books, derive their value from the four which we call the Gospels.”

Part of the synoptic problem is determining the sources that the Holy Spirit led the evangelists to use in producing their Gospels. There is internal evidence (within the individual Gospels themselves) that the writers used source materials as they wrote. The most obvious example of this is the Old Testament passages to which each one referred directly or indirectly.

Since Matthew and John were disciples of Jesus Christ, many of their statements represent eyewitness accounts of what happened. Likewise, Mark had close connections with Peter, and Luke was an intimate associate of Paul as well as a careful historian (Luke 1:1-4). Information that the writers obtained verbally (oral tradition) and in writing (documents) undoubtedly played a part in what they wrote. Perhaps the evangelists also received special revelations from God before and/or when they wrote their Gospels.

Some scholars have devoted much time and attention to the study of the other sources the evangelists may have used. They are the “source critics” and their work constitutes “source criticism.” Because source criticism and its development are so crucial to Gospel studies, a brief introduction to this subject follows.(in following article)/

III. Charles C. Ryrie. B.A., Th. M., Th. D., Ph. D.. Litt. D., (1925-2016).

Charles Ryrie https://www.amazon.com/Charles-Caldwell-Ryrie/e/B001HMRTWW
Charles Ryrie https://www.moodypublishers.com/authors/r/charles-ryrie/

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Charles_Caldwell_Ryrie

Chapter 9 Notes.

9:20. “the fringe of His cloak.” Probably the fringes or tassels at the corners of Christ’s mantle. These were religious reminders to the wearer to observe their commandments (Num. 15:37-39; Ryrie note (15:37-41, Like “tying a string around the finger,” the “tassels” and “cord” of blue on the edges of their garments were to remind Israel to obey God’s commands). 

Consider the following information:

Unger’s Bible Dictionary, Merrill F. Unger (Th. D., Ph. D.). page 277, dress. “Mantle or cloak,” a piece of cloth, nearly square, a sort of blanket or plaid. Moses commanded that there should be a fringe upon the four corners of this garment, together with a blue cord or ribband, to remind the people of the heavenly origin of his statutes (Matt 9:20, Lk 8:44).

The Moody Bible Commentary, Michael Vanlaningham, M. Div., Ph. D. Re 9:20. “The fringe of His cloak,” may have been the tassels that were worn on the four corners of one’s garments to remind a person of the Law (Nm 15:38-41, Dt 22:12). Re: Dt 22:12. Tassels were to be placed on the four corners of their garments, and while the explanation or reason is not stated here, it was earlier (Nm 15:37-41). The tassels were to serve as an object lesson to help the Israelites remember the Lord’s commandments wherever they went.

Tallit: What Is Tzitzit (and Tallit)?

https://www.chabad.org/library/article_cdo/aid/537949/jewish/What-Is-Tzitzit-and-Tallit.htm

Tallit: Did Yeshua (Jesus) Wear Tzitzit, the traditional Jewish Fringes?

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tallit

9:27. “Son of David.” A title that linked Jesus to the messianic line (of 1:1). 

IV. John F. Walvoord. A.B., M.A. Th. B., Th.M., Th. D., D.D., Litt. D. (1910-2002).

Bio – https://bible.org/users/john-f-walvoordhttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Walvoord  

John F. Walvoord, https://www.thriftbooks.com/a/john-f-walvoord/203232/
(1910-2012) long-time president of Dallas Theological Seminary, was one of the most prominent evangelical scholars of his generation. He is considered perhaps the world’s foremost interpreter of biblical prophecy.

The Authority Of The King To Forgive Sin (Part 2 of 2)

Two Women Healed, 9:18-26

As Jesus was discussing His answer to the question of the disciples of John, a ruler of the Jews came and, having done obeisance, petitioned Him to raise his daughter whom he declared to be already dead (cf. Mk 5:21-43Lk 8:40-56). As Jesus followed him, a woman in the crowd, afflicted with an issue of blood for twelve years, touched the hem of His garment, believing that if she could but touch His garment, she would be made well. In Mark 5:30, Christ is recorded to have asked the question, “Who touched my clothes?” In response to the question, the woman identified herself. Matthew does not include these details but records the comforting words of Christ that her faith had made her whole.

The journey to the ruler’s house continued, and upon arrival, Jesus saw the musicians who had been hired to play the dirges, as was customary when a death occurred. He told them, however, “Give place: for the maid is not dead, but sleepeth” (Mt 9:24). They responded by laughing with unbelief. Jesus, having put the people out of the house, took the maid by the hand, and she was immediately restored. Because Jesus used a word for sleeping (Gr. katheudo) not customarily used in Scripture for death, some expositors believe that she was not actually dead, but merely in a stupor.52 Most commentators, however, believe that Christ was merely declaring to them that she was sleeping, in the sense that she would soon rise. Actually, her parents were correct that she was dead. The report of the miracle was given widespread notice and added to the fame of Christ, which would have involved a degree of deception if she were not actually dead.

Healing of Two Blind Men, 9:27-31

This account, found only in Matthew, records Christ’s encounter with two blind men who followed Him, saying, “Son of David, have mercy on us” (9:27). Apparently, because Jesus did not heal them immediately, the blind men followed Him into the house. Having thus tested them, Jesus asked if they believed He was able to heal. When they replied in the affirmative, He touched their eyes saying, “According to your faith be it unto you,” and they were healed. Although He told them not to tell anyone, they nevertheless spread abroad His fame. The prohibition of revealing that they had been healed was probably due to the fact that Jesus did not want to excite followers who would come to Him simply to be healed.

Another Demoniac Healed, 9:32-35

As the blind men were leaving with their newfound sight, a man was brought in, possessed of a demon and unable to talk. This account also is found only in Matthew. Christ, according to the record, immediately healed him so that he was able to speak, and as the multitudes watched, they marveled, saying that such miracles had never happened before in Israel. The Pharisees, however, continued to be unbelieving, accusing Him of casting out demons by Satan, the prince of demons. The account of this miracle is followed by a statement summarizing Christ’s ministry of teaching and preaching, accompanied by healing all who came to Him.

Compassion of Jesus for the Multitudes, 9:36-38

Although the miracles of Christ had attracted hundreds of followers, Jesus was all too aware of their spiritual needs. Their faith was superficial, and they were like sheep without a shepherd. His compassion for them moved Him to say to His disciples that they should pray for laborers, for the harvest was great and the laborers few. The great miracles He had performed, recorded in Matthew 8-9, were not accepted by many of the Jews, and growing evidence of unbelief is found in the chapters which follow. As Kelly observes, “The Lord is utterly rejected in chapter 11. And then chapter 12 gives the final pronouncing of the judgment on that generation… The consequence is that the Lord turns from the unbelieving race and introduces the kingdom of heaven, in connection with which He gives the parables in chapter 13.”

In what sense did Jesus introduce the kingdom of heaven at this point? Obviously, He had been talking about kingdom principles all through the gospel of Matthew. The change here relates to the kingdom in its mystery form, the kingdom as it will exist between the first and second comings of Christ, in contrast to the millennial kingdom, predicted in the Old Testament and to be fulfilled after His second advent.

V. Summary.

It is important to remember that the activity of these verses show Jesus interacting with Jews, and not Gentiles.

Per the note of Charles Ryrie on 9:20, Gentiles would have known nothing about the significance of the “fringe of the cloak” of Jesus, or of its relationship to Numbers 15:37-41. Per the note of Ryrie on 9:27, neither would Gentiles have had any knowledge of  the term,”Son of David,” in relation to Jesus as Messiah. 

As the Gospel of  Matthew relates to the offer of the Kingdom to Israel, Jesus was giving the Jews a glimpse of the Kingdom, which will be on earth (Matt 6:10, “thy kingdom come…to earth”), such as in relation to healing, Matt 9:18-35. See Isaiah 35: 5-6. (Ryrie note, The Kingdom and its Blessings), “physical healings will abound.”

VI.  My Bucket List shows the references that I consult, of theologians and printed resources, whenever I write an article that will be posted. Please find the Pages of my site to find Bucket List.

VII. My Websites To Follow

https://equippingblog.wordpress.com/ Eternity

https://untotheleastofthese.home.blog/ Book Prep

https://newsandcommentary38395276.wordpress.com/ Thy Kingdom Come

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