Salvation In Christ (National and Personal). The Book Of John 1:29-34. 26-30 A.D.

I. Title. The Testimony Of John The Baptist. 4.

II. Text: John 1:29-34. All verses come from the Updated American Standard Version. https://www.uasvbible.org/

29 On the next day he saw Jesus coming to him, and said, “Look, the Lamb of God who takes away the sin of the world! 30 This one is the one about whom I said, ‘After me is coming a man who is ahead of me, because he existed before me. 31 And I did not know him, but in order that he might be manifested to Israel, because of this I came baptizing in water.” 32 And John bore witness saying, “I have seen the Spirit descend from heaven like a dove, and it remained on him. 33 I myself did not recognize him, but the one who sent me to baptize in water that one said to me, ‘the one upon whom you see the Spirit descending and remaining upon him, this one is the one who baptizes in the Holy Spirit.’ 34 And I have seen, and I have borne witness that this one is the Son of God.”

III. Comments. The Expositor’s Bible Commentary (Abridged Edition): New Testament.

A. John 1:29.  

1. The chronological scheme of this section is indicated by the reference to successive days: the first day, when the delegation from Jerusalem questioned John (1:19-28); the “next” (second) day, when John saw Jesus approaching (1:29-34); the “next” (third) day, when John pointed out Jesus to his disciples and when they visited him (1:35-42); and the “next” (fourth) day, when Jesus “decided to leave for Galilee” (1:43-50).

2. The witness of John the Baptist was positive as well as negative and focused on Jesus rather than on himself. Verses 29-34 contain his presentation of the person of Jesus. Two aspects stand out in the titles by which he introduced Jesus. “The Lamb of God” reflects the sacrificial character of Christ’s mission, probably alluding to Isa 53:7 (cf. v.36Ac 8:321Pe 1:19). The sacrifice of a lamb as a substitute or as an atonement for sin appears frequently in the OT, beginning with Abraham in Ge 22:2-8. In Lev 14:10-25, a lamb was prescribed as a guilt offering. The book of Revelation also refers to “the Lamb” (Rev 5:6-136:1-357; et al.), though it employs this title as a triumphal title, memorializing the completion of Christ’s sacrificial work. The title “Lamb of God” here in Jn 1:29 therefore refers to the atoning work of Christ, who by one final sacrifice of himself removed the guilt of our sins and opened the way to God. John the Baptist limited his own function to introducing Jesus and declared that only the latter could take away sin.

B. John 1:30. This verse is essentially a restatement of v.15, with one significant addition. John calls Jesus “a man who comes after me.” The Greek word for “man” in the verse is the word for “male.” It intimates the headship of Christ over his followers in the sense of the man-woman relationship in marriage.

C. John 1:31.  The identity of the Messiah was unknown to John the Baptist. This does not mean that John did not know Jesus personally, for, after all, they were relatives (Lk 1:36). John’s ministry was twofold: he was to lead his hearers to repentance (Mk 1:4) and to reveal the Messiah to Israel. Somehow John understood that the revelation of Messiah would take place in conjunction with his baptizing ministry; therefore, he remained faithful to his calling. However, even after Messiah had been revealed to Israel at the baptism of Jesus, John continued the other aspect of his ministry.

D. John 1:32-34. 

1. The second aspect of John’s witness to Jesus (see comment on v.29) concerned the title “Son of God.” This aspect was related to the work of the Holy Spirit, who both authenticated the mission of Jesus and was the seal of his work in individual lives. John announced that Jesus would impart the Holy Spirit to his followers. To “baptize with the Holy Spirit” means that just as the common experience of baptism in water signified repentance and confession of sin, so the indwelling of the Holy Spirit is the seal and dynamic of the new life. Repentance and confession are the conditions on which the believer receives the gift of the Spirit (cf. Ac 2:38Gal 3:25:16-25). The manifestation of the presence of the Spirit in Jesus’ case was visible (see Lk 3:21-22), though this gospel records the Baptist’s later reflection on that event.

2. John the Baptist’s solemn avowal that he had seen the descent of the Spirit on Jesus and that he is “the Son of God” is the climax of his testimony. The significance of the title can be best understood in the light of 1:18 . John’s emphatic declaration was the reason why the disciples left him to follow Jesus.

IV. Comments. The Bible Knowledge Commentary. 

A. This passage (John1:19-1250) is from “Jesus’ Manifestation To The Nation”.

B. The major part of John’s Gospel describes the public ministry of Jesus to the nation of Israel. It is a “book of signs,” a narrative of seven of Jesus’ miracles that point to Him as Messiah. Along with the signs are public discourses explaining the significance of the signs and two long private interviews (chaps. 3-4).

V. My Comments. 

A. It is important to understand that which is written in the above comment (IV.B.).

B. Consider the role of John the Baptist, who was a forerunner of Jesus. From John 1: 6-7; “6 A man was sent from God, whose name was John. 7 This one came as a witness, in order that he could bear witness about the light, so that all might believe through him.”

C. Consider the audience in the above scripture about Jesus, being the nation of Israel, with varying results. From John 1:11-12, “11 He came to his own people, and his own people did not receive him. 12 On the other hand, as many as received him, he gave authority to them to become children of God, to the ones believing in his name.” At this time in the ministry of Jesus, it was directed at the salvation of the nation of Israel, with personal salvation taking place.. 

1. Consider the words of the forerunner, John the Baptist. Notice the word in verse 2, “Repent.”

a. Matthew 3:1-3:  1Now in those days John the Baptist came preaching in the wilderness of Judea, saying, “Repent, for the kingdom of heaven has come near.” For this is the one referred to by Isaiah the prophet when he said,

“The voice of one crying out in the wilderness,
‘Make ready the way of the Lord,
    make his paths straight.’

b. Repentance is explained in the Greek Lexicon:3340. metanoeó: to change one’s mind or purpose. UsageI repent, change my mind, change the inner man (particularly with reference to acceptance of the will of God), repent. 

c. The repentance, as spoken by John The Baptist, relates to the Jews’ acceptance of Jesus as God’s prophesied Messiah, “Israel’s Messiah.,” (Isaiah 9:6-7, 740 B.C.), (Deuteronomy 17:15, 1451 B.C.).

d. The ministry of Jesus to the Jews of Israel, in relation to national restoration, is seen in the following verses:

(1) Matthew 4:17:  From that time Jesus began to preach, saying, “Repent, for the kingdom of heavens has drawn near.” The Kingdom that Jesus mentioned was the Kingdom that was prophesied in the Davidic Covenant (2 Sam 7:4-12, 1042 B.C.).

(2) Matthew 10:5-7: “These twelve Jesus sent out, instructing them: “Do not go off into the way of the Gentiles, and do not enter a city of the Samaritans; but go rather to the lost sheep of the house of Israel. And as you go, proclaim, saying, ‘The kingdom of heavens has drawn near.'” Jesus sent His disciples to Israel, saying that the Kingdom was not “here,” but “near.” If Israel had accepted Christ as Messiah, they would have gone into the Kingdom, then.

(3) Luke 9:1-2: “1 And he called the twelve together and gave them power and authority over all demons and to cure diseases, and he sent them out to proclaim the kingdom of God and to heal.” Again, Jesus sends out His twelve disciples to preach the Kingdom, and gave them supernatural powers.

(4) Luke 9:1,11: “But when the crowds found out, they followed him, and he welcomed them and spoke to them of the kingdom of God and cured those who had need of healing.” Jesus spoke of the Kingdom.

(5) Luke 10: 1, 9: “1 Now after these things the Lord appointed seventy others and sent them on ahead of him, two by two, into every city and place where he himself was about to go. And heal the sick in it and say to them, ‘The kingdom of God has come near to you.'” Jesus now sends seventy of His followers to teach about the kingdom. 

e. The consequence of Israel’s rejection of Christ, as Messiah, is seen in Luke 13:3. “No, I tell you; but unless you repent, you will all likewise perish.”

D. It was through belief in Christ that some Jews accepted Him as Messiah. It was due to unbelief, that other Jews did not accept Christ as Messiah. Once the ministry of Jesus turns to individual salvation, the message of “belief,” is the same.  The word, “repent,” is not spoken by Christ to individuals as a part of salvation. The opposite of belief is unbelief. Both words are mentioned in Christ’s words to individuals in the following verses.

1. John 3:16:  “For God so loved the world that he gave his only begotten Son, in order that whoever believes in him will not be destroyed but have eternal life.” In these words of Jesus, He is “to the point,” that it is due to belief in Him that one has eternal life. Eternal life begins at the time of belief. Anyone who was present in this setting, and believed in Jesus, was saved and did not have to return for sessions two, three, four, etc., and didn’t have to do anything of works to attain salvation, or to keep that salvation. No one can repent enough to attain salvation. The “growing in Christ” that occurs in a person’s life comes as a result of the indwelling of the Holy Spirit of God, with His influence on the believer. (John 14:16; 16:7-11; 1 Cor 6:14-16; 2 Cor 5:17). In 2 Cor 5:17, the “old things and new things,” are the old spirit, which needs to be regenerated through the new birth; and  the  new spirit which has been born again, having been regenerated.  

2. John 3:18: “The one who believes in him is not judged, but the one who does not believe has already been judged, because he has not believed in the name of the only begotten Son of God.” In this verse, Jesus is very clear as to the blessings of belief, and the consequences of unbelief. The judgment of condemnation in the lake of fire (Rev 20:15) awaits anyone who does not believe in Christ. That judgment for unbelievers will change to a blessing of spending eternity with Christ, at the time that they believe in Him. John 17:3 shows belief in Christ as being intimacy. 

3. John 11:25 Jesus said to her, “I am the resurrection and the life. The one believing in me, though he dies, yet shall he live, 26 and everyone living and believing in me shall never die. Do you believe this?” 27 She said to him, “Yes, Lord; I have believed that you are the Christ, the Son of God, who is coming into the world.” Notice the question that Jesus spoke to Martha, “do you believe?” (the word,” this,” relates to that which Jesus told her about belief in Him.”). 

VI. John the Baptist was sent to the Jews of Israel with a message of national restoration (John 1). Isaiah 40:3-5 (712 B.C.) was a prophecy of John, “the voice of one crying in the wilderness.”  In John Chapter 3, the context shifts to personal, individual, salvation. The latter days of the ministry of John The Baptist can be seen in John 3:22-36 (30 A.D,); he was beheaded in Matthew 14:10 (32 A.D.). Christ continued His ministry to national Israel, and to individuals, within the confines of Israel. It can be seen that at the time of John 13, the message of Christ was no longer one of Israel’s restoration, but was of personal salvation. The rejection of Christ by Israel, in Matthew 23:37-39, was the turning point in the ministry of Jesus from Israel to individuals. At that time, Jesus no longer spoke publicly, and will not do so until at the time of His second coming, at which time Israel will recognize and welcome their rejected Messiah (Zechariah 12:10, Ryrie Study Bible note, Matthew 23:39.)

VII.  Conclusion. The message of John The Baptist and Jesus, of national restoration for Israel, to the Jews of the nation of Israel, was that of repentance in receiving Jesus as the Messiah, as Jesus being God’s choice to be the King of Israel (Deuteronomy 17:15), as Jesus being “God with us,” (Isaiah 7:14; Matthew 1:23). The message of individual salvation, was that of belief in Jesus, and only belief in Jesus. Scripture shows that salvation does not come by “asking Jesus to come into your heart,” or by saying a sinner’s prayer, or by showing a life of repentance. Jesus never told anyone to repent of their sins in order to believe in Him for individual salvation. The following scriptures show “belief,” and only “belief,” as being necessary for anyone to be saved.

A. The message of Christ is spread throughout the world through God’s Holy Spirit to everyone (John 1:9).  “As many as receive Jesus, He has given authority to them to become children of God, to the ones believing in his name (John 1:12).” The purpose of the Gospel of John is  that you may believe that Jesus is the Christ, the Son of God, and that by believing you may have life in his name (John 20:31).

B. Consider these words of scripture about the new birth (John 1:11-13): “11 He came to his own people, and his own people did not receive him. 12 On the other hand, as many as received him, he gave authority to them to become children of God, to the ones believing in his name; 13 who were born, not of blood, nor of the will of the flesh, nor of the will of man, but of God.” (John 3:3) 3 Jesus answered and said to him, “Truly, truly I say to you, unless someone is born again, he cannot see the kingdom of God.” (John 3:8) “The wind blows wherever it wants, and you hear the sound of it, but you do not know where it comes from and where it is going. So is everyone having been born from the spirit.” The truth of the new birth is that it happens by God’s Holy Spirit, “to those who believe in His Name.”

C. It is only through the new birth that God’s Holy Spirit takes up residence within each believer in Christ (John 14:16-17). Once we have been born again, we can not be unborn. We can not force God’s Holy Spirit from within our spirit. No one can remove the Holy Spirit from us; neither can we (John 10:28-30). It was not “through us” that we “walked to salvation;” and it can not be “by us” that we “walk away from salvation.”

D. While Israel’s blessings were primarily physical, earthly, and material, the church’s blessings are primarily heavenly and spiritual (The Coming Kingdom, Andrew M. Woods, Pg 152).

E. Israel will see the Kingdom restored at the time of the return of Christ at the Battle of Armageddon. (Zechariah 14:1-4; Matthew 24:29-31; Mark 13:24-27; Luke 21:25-28; Revelation 19:11-21).

Salvation In Christ . The Book Of John 1:29. 26 A.D.

I. Video. Sweet, Sweet Spirit [Live]. Doris Akers. Notice the correlation between the song that is being sung and the message of this article. Doris went to be with the Lord in 1995.

II. Title. The Testimony of John the Baptist. 3.

III. Text. John 1:29. New American Standard Bible.

The next day he *saw Jesus coming to him, and *said, “Behold, the Lamb of God who takes away the sin of the world!

IV. Comments. All scriptures are from the New American Standard Bible 2020.

A. MacArthur Study Bible Comments.

1. The next day. This phrase probably refers to the day after John’s response to the Jerusalem delegation. It also initiates a sequence of days (v. 432:1) that culminated in the miracle at Cana (2:1–11). 

2. The Lamb of God. The use of a lamb for sacrifice was very familiar to Jews. A lamb was used as a sacrifice during Passover (Ex. 12:1–36); a lamb was led to the slaughter in the prophecies of Isaiah (Is. 53:7); a lamb was offered in the daily sacrifices of Israel (Lev. 14:12–21; cf. Heb. 10:5–7). John the Baptist used this expression as a reference to the ultimate sacrifice of Jesus on the cross to atone for the sins of the world, a theme which John the apostle carries throughout his writings (19:36; cf. Rev. 5:1–67:1717:14) and that appears in other NT writings (e.g., 1 Pet. 1:19). 

3. sin of the world. See note on v. 9; cf. 3:166:3351. In this context “world” has the connotation of humanity in general, not specifically every person. The use of the singular “sin” in conjunction with “of the world” indicates that Jesus’ sacrifice for sin potentially reaches all human beings without distinction (cf. 1 John 2:2). John makes clear, however, that its efficacious effect is only for those who receive Christ (vv. 1112). For discussion of the relation of Christ’s death to the world, see note on 2 Cor. 5:19.

B. My Comments.

1. Notice the words, “sin of the world.” Consider personal sins, such as theft, lying, etc. None of the sins of the human will keep anyone out of heaven, the kingdom age, or the eternal state. However, there are many references to “sins,” that are addressed in the gospels, that relate to the nation of Israel.

2. Consider Matthew 1:21: “She will give birth to a Son; and you shall name Him Jesus, for He will save His people from their sins.” The “sins” of Matt 1:21 relate to the nation of Israel, as Christ came to “not remember the sins of Israel(Isa 43:25), and to offer national salvation to Israel, which they rejected.

3. Consider John 1:11: “He came to His own, and His own people did not accept Him.” John The Baptist, who was the forerunner of Christ, was a witness of the Messiah, Jesus (John 1:6-8).

4. Consider Matthew 3:1-3: “1 Now in those days John the Baptist *came, preaching in the wilderness of Judea, saying, “Repent, for the kingdom of heaven is at hand.” For this is the one referred to by Isaiah the prophet when he said, “The voice of one calling out in the wilderness,
‘Prepare the way of the Lord, Make His paths straight!’”

a. The coming of Christ was in fulfillment of Isaiah’s prophecy of Isaiah 40:3 (712 B.C.), as well as Isaiah 7:14 (742B.C.) and Isaiah 9:6-7 (740 B.C.). Isaiah 40:3, 7:14 and 9:6a refer to the first coming of Christ in birth (Matt 1:21-25). Isaiah 9:6b-9:7 refers to the second coming of Christ at the end of the Tribulation (Matt 24:29-31) to set up His Kingdom on Earth (the 1,000 year millennium).

b. The message of national repentance to the Jews is recorded in many other Gospel Scriptures, for them to accept Christ as the Messiah of Old Testament Scriptures. The message of Christ to the Israel was, “I am God with you,” (Isa 7:14, Matt 1:23).

(1). Matthew 4:17: ‘From that time Jesus began to preach and say, “Repent, for the kingdom of heaven is at hand.” ‘ Jesus wasn’t saying that “the Kingdom was here, but was near,” based on their accepting Him as Messiah. The Kingdom is that which was taught to Israel in the Abrahamic and David Covenants (Gen 15:18-21; 2 Sam 7:8-17)

(2). Matthew 10:5-7: ‘These twelve Jesus sent out after instructing them, saying, “Do not go on a road to Gentiles, and do not enter a city of Samaritans; but rather go to the lost sheep of the house of Israel. And as you go, preach, saying, ‘The kingdom of heaven has come near.” ‘Jesus sent His disciples only to the Jews, to teach about the kingdom.

(3). Luke 10:9: “and heal those in it who are sick, and say to them, ‘The kingdom of God has come near to you.” Jesus sent seventy others to preach about the “nearness of the Kingdom,”

(4). Luke 13:3: “No, I tell you, but unless you repent, you will all likewise perish.” There is sharp contrast to this verse and John 3:16. Luke 13:3 relates to the national salvation of Israel. John 3:16 relates to personal salvation. Notice in John 3:16, the command of Jesus is to “believe;” He says nothing about repentance. At the time of individual belief, “salvation takes place in the life of such a believer.”

(5). The Words of Jesus in John 3:16 are clear, and to the point. Nothing more than belief in Christ is required for personal salvation. Consider the following verses that relate belief to salvation, all of which are from the Gospel of John: 3:15, 3:16, 3:18, 3:36, 5:24, 6:40, 6:47, 7:38, 11:26, 11:40. 12:46, 20:31. Notice that in 5:24, eternal life comes from belief, and can not be reversed, as does John 10:28-30. We can not walk away from Salvation; we did not walk to Salvation. After we have been born again, we can not be unborn.

(6). After the Jews rejected Jesus’s offer of the Kingdom, His ministry was directed to “the world,” per John 1:11-13.

(7). Let’s get back to John 1:29, “the sin of the world,” which is also the unpardonable sin. The outward sins of theft, lying, etc., do not keep anyone from Heaven. But, the inner sin of “unbelief” (John 3:18), is a barrier than can not be removed, except through a personal belief in Christ (John 3:16). Salvation is not a formula of “works plus belief,” or anything else “plus belief.” Through the radiating power of God’s Holy Spirit, the message of Christ is made available to everyone in the world (John 1:5, 9).

(8). If a person were to exhaust a day of analyzing the understanding of “belief” through a Hebrew or Greek dictionary, it is important to understand that those around Jesus did not have Greek as their commonly spoken language. There are seven Greek words that mean “love.” Consider the possibilities for the many meanings of John 3:16, “believe.” 4100 pisteúō (from 4102 /pístis, “faith,” derived from 3982 /peíthō, “persuade, be persuaded”) – believe (affirm, have confidence); used of persuading oneself (= human believing) and with the sacred significance of being persuaded by the Lord (= faith-believing). Only the context indicates whether 4100 /pisteúō (“believe”) is self-serving (without sacred meaning), or the believing that leads to/proceeds from God’s inbirthing of faith. If Jesus has been speaking Greek to his disciples, I can not imagine Him going through every possible meaning of the Greek word for “belief.”. Jesus wanted to convey a clear understanding of what it took for a person to spend eternity with Him, and to avoid eternal condemnation. He spoke “belief.”

(9). Consider the following discussion by “God Questions.” “While Jesus very likely spoke Aramaic, Hebrew, and Greek, Aramaic was likely the language Jesus spoke the most. ” https://www.gotquestions.org/language-Jesus-speak.html

(10). After belief in Christ, there is growing in Christ, which is aided by the indwelling of God’s Holy Spirit in the new birth (John 3:3), and the teaching of the Holy Spirit that comes to every born again believer in Christ (John 16:7-11).

V. Article Sources.

1. Video from “Turn Your Radio On” Gaither series of songs, recorded in 1993. The video was posted by Gaither Music TV on December 13, 2012.
2. Article Title from New American Stand Bible Translation 2020.
3. Text from BibleGateway.com print of New American Stand Bible Translation 2020.

VI. Added Comment. Notice that the account of Scripture that is being studied is that of John The Baptist. The writer of the account is John The Apostle.

VII. Please follow this site.

Salvation In Christ . The Book Of John 1:24-28 . 26 A.D.

I. Video. Russ Taff – ‘Farther Along [Live]’, Gaither Music TV. Dec 13, 2012.

II. Title. The Testimony of John the Baptist. 2.

III. Text. John 1:24-28. New American Standard Bible.

24 And the messengers had been sent from the Pharisees. 25 They asked him, and said to him, “Why then are you baptizing, if you are not the Christ, nor Elijah, nor the Prophet?” 26 John answered them, saying, “I baptize in water, but among you stands One whom you do not know. 27 It is He who comes after me, of whom I am not worthy even to untie the strap of His sandal.” 28 These things took place in Bethany beyond the Jordan, where John was baptizing people.

IV. Comments. The Expositor’s Bible Commentary-Abridged Volume 2: New Testament

A. 24-25. The Pharisees represented the strict interpreters of the Law and were particularly interested in examining the credentials of any new religious teacher in Judaism. This gospel does not show unvarying hostility toward them. Nicodemus was a Pharisee and was apparently a sincere if unenlightened person (see 3:1-21). As a class, however, they were hostile toward Jesus because he did not observe traditional rules and because he openly rebuked their superficial and often hypocritical religiosity. These Pharisees challenged John’s right to baptize.

B. 26-27.

1. John suggested that he did not profess to speak with ultimate authority. He was, after all, preaching repentance (Lk 3:3) and was calling for baptism as a confession of repentance in expectation of the greater person who was yet to appear. It seems likely that John’s baptism followed the pattern of proselyte baptism, which required a renunciation of all evil, complete immersion in water, and then reclothing as a member of the holy community of law-keepers.

2. John drew his reference to untying the sandals of his successor from the practice of using the lowest slave of a household to remove the sandals and wash the feet of guests. John’s witness, therefore, reflected the exalted nature of Jesus and placed the latter far above himself.

C. 28. “Bethany on the other side of Jordan” was so named to distinguish it from the Bethany near Jerusalem (see 12:1). Its exact site is unknown.

V. Article Sources.

1. Video from “Turn Your Radio On” Gaither series of songs, recorded in 1993.
2. Article Title from New American Stand Bible Translation 2020.
3. Text from BibleGateway.com print of New American Stand Bible Translation 2020.
4. The Expositor’s Bible Commentary-Abridged Volume 2: New Testament; Comments by
Kenneth L. Barker and John R. Kohlenberger III; a source of BibleHub.com

VI. Added Comment. Notice that the account of Scripture that is being studied is that of John The Baptist. The writer of the account is John The Apostle.

VII. Please follow this site.

Salvation In Christ . The Book Of John 1:19-23 . 26 A.D.

I. Video. The Talley Trio – He Is Here [Live]. Gaither Music TV. Dec 13, 2012.

II. Title. The Testimony of John the Baptist. 1.

III. Text. John 1:19-23. New American Standard Bible.

19 This is the testimony of John, when the Jews sent priests and Levites to him from Jerusalem to ask him, “Who are you?” 20 And he confessed and did not deny; and this is what he confessed: “I am not the Christ.” 21 And so they asked him, “What then? Are you Elijah?” And he *said, “I am not.” “Are you the Prophet?” And he answered, “No.” 22 Then they said to him, “Who are you? Tell us, so that we may give an answer to those who sent us. What do you say about yourself?” 23 He said, “I am the voice of one calling out in the wilderness, ‘Make the way of the Lord straight,’ as Isaiah the prophet said.”

IV. Comments. Zondervan KJV Study Bible

1:19. And this is the record of John points to the Baptist’s role as witness (see 1:6-7). “Record” (Greek, martyria) is literally “testimony.” Here the testimony of John was given a formal venue with the inquest of the delegation that the Jews sent … from Jerusalem. The phrase “the Jews” occurs about seventy times in this gospel. It is used in a favorable sense (see, e.g., 4:22) and in a neutral sense (see, e.g., 2:6), but generally John used it of the Jewish leaders who were hostile to Jesus (see, e.g., 8:48). Here it refers to the delegation sent by the Sanhedrin to look into the activities of an unauthorized teacher. Levites are descendants of the tribe of Levi, who were assigned to specific duties in connection with the tabernacle and temple (see Num. 3:17-37). They also had teaching responsibilities (see 2 Chron. 35:3; Neh. 8:7-9), and it was probably in this role that they were sent with the priests to John the Baptist.

1:20. The Baptist used the emphatic “I” to establish a stark contrast. His disavowal, I am not the Christ implies the question “Are you the Christ?” according to the pattern of the questions and answers that follow. It may be, however, that the unique introduction of And he confessed, and denied not; but confessed suggests the leading question was more benign, such as, “Who are you?” to which the Baptist assumed a proactive posture (“I am not the Christ”). If so, that triggered the follow-up questions (all associated with messianic expectations). The Baptist’s emphatic use of “I” implies the avowal that another was the Christ. Throughout the following verses, this emphatic “I” occurs frequently, and almost invariably implies a contrast with Jesus, who is always given the higher place.

1:21. Art thou Elias?… I am not. The Jews remembered that Elijah had not died (see 2 Kings 2:11) and believed that the same prophet would come back to earth to announce the end time. In this sense, John properly denied that he was Elijah. When Jesus later said the Baptist was Elijah (see Matt. 11:14; 17:10-13), He meant it in the sense that John was a fulfillment of the prophecy of Malachi 4:5 (see Luke 1:17). That prophet refers to the prophet of Deuteronomy 18:15, 18. The Jewish people expected a variety of persons to be associated with the coming of the Messiah. The Baptist emphatically denied being “that prophet.” He had come to testify about Jesus, yet they kept asking him about himself. His answers became progressively more terse.

1:22-23. The voice of one crying in the wilderness (v. 23). The Baptist applied the prophecy of Isaiah 40:3 to his ministry of calling people to repent in preparation for the coming of the Messiah. The men of Qumran (the community that produced the Dead Sea Scrolls) applied the same words to themselves, but they prepared for the Lord’s coming by isolating themselves from the world to secure their own salvation. John concentrated on helping people come to the Messiah (the Christ). In 1:31, the Baptist expressly stated that the objective of his baptism was to reveal to Israel the Coming One.

V. Article Sources.

1. Video from “Old Friends” Gaither series of songs, recorded in 1993.
2. Article Title from New American Stand Bible Translation 2020.
3. Text from BibleGateway.com print of New American Stand Bible Translation 2020.
4. Zondervan KJV Study Bible, comments by Dr. Ed Hindson, a source of BibleHub.com

VI. Please follow this site.

Salvation In Christ . The Book Of John 1:15-18 . 26 A.D.

I. Opening Video. Click on the arrow; the video will play.

A. Hunger For Holiness | Music Videos | Carman. May 23, 2016. Carman Licciardello.

B. As you listen to Carman in the video, consider the Holiness of God. Consider the need that we have of seeking Him, and of drawing into worship of our Lord. The following passages of Scripture tell of such a relationship that is present between God and those who seek Him. (HCSB. You may have heard a song that is taken from #3.)

1. Psalm 63:1
God, You are my God; I eagerly seek You.
I thirst for You;
my body faints for You
in a land that is dry, desolate, and without water.

2. Isaiah 26:9
I long for You in the night;
yes, my spirit within me diligently seeks You,

3. Psalm 42:1-2
1. As a deer longs for streams of water, so I long for You, God.
2. I thirst for God, the living God. When can I come and appear before God?

II. The Testimony Of John The Baptist Concerning Jesus. John 1:15-18.

A. Introduction.

1. Consider the words of Dr. John F. Walvoord. 1

2. The ministry of John the Baptist as a forerunner of Jesus was prophesied in Isaiah 40:3-5; Matthew calls attention to this (Matt 3:3; Isa 40:3). Luke quotes the whole passage of Isaiah 40:3-5 (Luke 3:4-6). John claimed that he was that prophet in connection with the baptism of Jesus (John 1:23). John had predicted, “This was He of whom I said, ‘He who comes after me has surpassed me’ ” (v. 15). John traced grace and all the blessing of God through Jesus, stating, “From the fullness of His grace we have all received one blessing after another. For the Law was given through Moses; grace and truth through Christ” (vv. 16-17). John, in effect, announced that a new dispensation would be brought in by Jesus in which grace and truth would be its central feature. These statements are compatible only with the concept that Jesus Christ is the Son of God and the promised Messiah of Israel.

B. Scriptures. New American Standard Bible.

1. John 1:15-18.

2. 15 John *testified about Him and called out, saying, “This was He of whom I said, ‘He who is coming after me has proved to be my superior, because He existed before me.’” 16 For of His fullness we have all received, and grace upon grace. 17 For the Law was given through Moses; grace and truth were realized through Jesus Christ. 18 No one has seen God at any time; God the only Son, who is in the arms of the Father, He has explained Him.

C. Comments.

1. 1:15. He was before me: Jesus was born after John the Baptist (see Luke 1:36) and began His ministry later than John the Baptist. Yet, John the Baptist said Jesus was before him, meaning that Jesus’ existence is from eternity past (v. 30). (NKJV Study Bible)

2. 1:16. Most people take the words of v. 15 to be John the Baptist’s. Probably the words of vv. 16–18 are those of John the writer of this Gospel, although they too may be John the Baptist’s. Grace for grace means grace piled upon grace. The background of this doubled term, as well as the use of the term in v. 17, is found in Ex. 32–34. Moses and the people had received grace, but they were in tremendous need of more grace (Ex. 33:13). (NKJV Study Bible)

3. 1:17. Throughout the NT, grace is God’s favor expressed to sinful humankind apart from any human works or worth. Though there was abundant grace and truth expressed by God through the Law He gave Moses, it is in the person of Jesus Christ that grace and truth are realized to the fullest. (NKJV Study Bible)

4. 1:18. “No one has seen God at any time.” I.e., since God is Spirit (4:24), no man has ever seen God in His essence, His Spirit-being. Yet, He assumed visible form, which men saw in the OT times (Gen 32:30; Ex 24:9-10; Jud 13:22; Isa 6:1; Dan 7:9), and in Jesus men could see God (14:8-9). Christ gives life (v. 12); He reveals (vv. 14, 18); He gives grace and truth (vv. 16-17). (Ryrie Study Bible)

III. Summary.

A. Consider “Grace.”

B. Consider the comments of Drs. Scofield and Ryrie.

1. Grace is “the kindness and love of God our Savior toward man.. . not by works of righteousness which we have done” (Titus 3:4; Titus 3:5). It is, therefore, constantly set in contrast to law, under which God demands righteousness from man, as, under grace, he gives righteousness to man (Romans 3:21; Romans 3:22; Romans 8:4; Philippians 3:9). Law is connected with Moses and works; grace with Christ and faith (John 1:17; Romans 10:4-10). Law blesses the good; grace saves the bad (Exodus 19:5; Ephesians 2:1-9). Law demands that blessings be earned; grace is a free gift (Deuteronomy 28:1-6; Ephesians 2:8; Romans 4:4; Romans 4:5). 2

2. As a dispensation, grace begins with the death and resurrection of Christ (Romans 3:24-26, Romans 4:24; Romans 4:25). The point of testing is no longer legal obedience as the condition of salvation, but acceptance or rejection of Christ, with good works as a fruit of salvation, (John 1:12; John 1:13; John 3:36; Matthew 21:37; Matthew 22:24; John 15:22; John 15:25; Hebrews 1:2; 1 John 5:10-12). The immediate result of this testing was the rejection of Christ by the Jews, and His crucifixion by Jew and Gentile (Acts 4:27). 2

3. Grace has a twofold manifestation: in salvation (Romans 3:24) and in the walk and service of the saved (Romans 6:15). 2

4. The dispensation of Grace will end at the second coming of Christ since, as suggested, the tribulation period itself is not a separate dispensation but is the judgment on those living persons who are Christ rejecters at the end of this present dispensation. The Scripture involved is Acts 2:1 to Revelation 19:21. 3

IV. Sources Of Information. I will put this statement of sources of information on each of my articles.

A. Credential information for named individuals in this article can be found on my Theologians website Page.

B. The following sources of information provide great teaching ideas; I encourage everyone to purchase these materials. The following study Bibles are two of the ones that I most often consult, both of which are key to the study of eschatology.

1. Ryrie Study Bible.

2. Scofield Study Bible.

C. Everyone reads something that someone else has written. Therefore, it is important to choose authors whom have proven to be knowledgeable of the things that they have written, and who also have a high degree of acceptance from their peers. In addition to the sources of information that are noted in the above paragraph, there are many other theologians for whom I have great respect, and whose works I use for reference in the articles that I write. A list of such theologians, along with their credentials, can be found on this website’s Page of my sources of information. On that sources page you can also find linked information that tells of the ministry works of many of those trusted theologians.

D. Footnotes.

1. John F. Walvoord, Every Prophecy of the Bible, pg 403, Chariot Victor Publishing, 1990.

2. Scofield Study Bible, John 1:17 note.

3. Charles C. Ryrie, Dispensationalism, pg 64, Moody Publishers, 1966.

V. Closing Video.

A. Revelation Song/Holy, Holy, Holy – FBC Jacksonville, FL. videosofblessings. Mar 26, 2012.

B. Revelation Song (Worthy Is the Lamb Who Was Slain) and Holy, Holy, Holy. Performed by Daniel Crews with the choir and orchestra of First Baptist Church, Jacksonville, FL. (Pastors’ Conference 2012)

C. It is my prayer that as you watch this video, you will sense an experience of true praise and worship of God, (“Father, Son and Holy Spirit; John 14:8-21; 16:5-11), through a deep and intimate relationship with Him (John 17:3).

VI. Please follow this site.

Salvation In Christ – The Book Of John – 1:14 – 26 A.D.

I. Video.

A. Carman – I Feel Jesus (Live Performance). CarmanTvOfficialSite. Jun 5, 2012.

B. Carman was an amazing man of God, a most effective minister of the Gospel of Christ through his music, and throughout his total life. I trust that as we are digging deeper into God’s Holy Word, that we are gaining a greater insight into what Scripture says about Christ, our Lord and Savior. As Carman sings this song, “I Feel Jesus,” may we ask ourselves if we sense the Presence of Jesus in our lives, “anytime-every time, anywhere-everywhere, as we feel our head hitting the pillow at night, as we feel our head coming off of the pillow in the morning?” Do we seek Jesus? Are we contented with the relationship that we have with Christ?

C. Consider the Love Question that is found in John 21:15-17. Three times, Jesus speaks the words, “Peter, do you love me?” Consider voice inflection. If Jesus were to come to you, and ask you, “do you love me?” how do you think that His words would sound to you? In your response, how would your words sound to Jesus? Read the words of this John 21:15-17 passage, and consider such voice inflection.
https://www.biblegateway.com/passage/?search=John+21%3A15-17&version=NASB

II. Preview.

There are many groups and individuals who deny the deity of Christ. John 1:14, though, provides proof of the deity of Christ. To help you with your own study of the deity of Christ, I have provided the John 1:14 scripture, as well as Greek Lexicon information, both of which are provided by Bible Hub, https://biblehub.com/ In the Summary of this article, scriptures come from Bible Gateway https://www.biblegateway.com/

III. Scripture Text. John 1:14 (26 A.D.)

John 1:14
New American Standard Bible 1977
And the Word became flesh, and dwelt among us, and we beheld His glory, glory as of the only begotten from the Father, full of grace and truth.

IV. Scripture Comments. (Ryrie Study Bible)

A. “the Word became flesh.” Jesus Christ was unique, for He was God from all eternity and yet joined Himself to sinful humanity in the Incarnation. The God-man possessed all the attributes of deity (Phil 2:6) and the attributes common to humanity (apart from sin), and He will exist forever as the God-man in His resurrected body (Acts 1:11; Rev 5:6). Only the God-man could be an adequate Savior; for He must be human in order to be able to suffer and die, and He must be God to make that death effective as a payment for sin. The use of the word “flesh” contradicts the Gnostic teaching that pure deity could not be united with flesh, which was regarded as entirely evil.

B. “glory.” In the OT, glory expressed the splendor of divine manifestation and attested the divine presence. Here, it means the visible manifestation of God in Christ.

C. “the only begotten.” Used here (and in John 1:18; 3:16, 18) of Christ, meaning the unique Son in a way totally different from any other who believes and is born as a child of God, simply because He is equal with God. Also used of the widow of Nain’s only son (Luke 7:12), Jairus’s only daughter (Luke 8:42), and Isaac, Abraham’s unique son (Hebrews 11:17).

V. Greek Lexicon, and related data, from Bible Hub. John 1:14.

A. NASB: “And the Word.” Greek: logos. Strong’s: 3056: a word (as embodying an idea), a statement, a speech. https://biblehub.com/lexicon/john/1-14.htm

1. 3056. logos. https://biblehub.com/greek/3056.htm

2. Strong’s Concordance
logos: a word (as embodying an idea), a statement, a speech
Phonetic Spelling: (log’-os)
Definition: a word (as embodying an idea), a statement, a speech
Usage: a word, speech, divine utterance, analogy.

3. HELPS Word-studies
3056 lógos (from 3004 /légō, “speaking to a conclusion”) – a word, being the expression of a thought; a saying. 3056 /lógos (“word”) is preeminently used of Christ (Jn 1:1), expressing the thoughts of the Father through the Spirit.
[3056 (lógos) is a common term (used 330 times in the NT) with regards to a person sharing a message (discourse, “communication-speech”). 3056 (lógos) is a broad term meaning “reasoning expressed by words.”]

B. NASB: “became.” Greek: egeneto. Strong’s: 1096: to come into being, to happen, to become. https://biblehub.com/lexicon/john/1-14.htm

1. 1096. ginomai. https://biblehub.com/greek/1096.htm

2. Strong’s Concordance
ginomai: to come into being, to happen, to become
Phonetic Spelling: (ghin’-om-ahee)
Definition: to come into being, to happen, to become
Usage: I come into being, am born, become, come about, happen.

3. HELPS Word-studies
1096 gínomai – properly, to emerge, become, transitioning from one point (realm, condition) to another. 1096 (gínomai) fundamentally means “become” (becoming, became) so it is not an exact equivalent to the ordinary equative verb “to be” (is, was, will be) as with 1510 /eimí (1511 /eínai, 2258 /ēn).
1096 (ginomai) means “to become, and signifies a change of condition, state or place” (Vine, Unger, White, NT, 109).
M. Vincent, “1096 (gínomai) means to come into being/manifestation implying motion, movement, or growth” (at 2 Pet 1:4). Thus it is used for God’s actions as emerging from eternity and becoming (showing themselves) in time (physical space).

C. NASB: “flesh.” Greek: sarx. Strong’s: 4561: flesh. https://biblehub.com/lexicon/john/1-14.htm

1. 4561. sarx. https://biblehub.com/greek/4561.htm

2. Strong’s Concordance
sarx: flesh
Phonetic Spelling: (sarx)
Definition: flesh
Usage: flesh, body, human nature, materiality; kindred.

3. HELPS Word-studies
4561 sárksproperly, flesh (“carnal”), merely of human origin or empowerment.
[4561 /sárks (“flesh”) is not always evil in Scripture. Indeed, it is used positively in relation to sexual intercourse in marriage (Eph 5:31) – as well as for the sinless human body of Jesus (Jn 1:14; 1 Jn 4:2,3). Indeed, flesh (what is physical) is necessary for the body to live out the faith the Lord works in (Gal 2:20).]
4561 (sarks) is generally negative, referring to making decisions (actions) according to self – i.e. done apart from faith (independent from God’s inworking). Thus what is “of the flesh (carnal)” is by definition displeasing to the Lord – even things that seem “respectable!” In short, flesh generally relates to unaided human effort, i.e. decisions (actions) that originate from self or are empowered by self. This is carnal (“of the flesh”) and proceeds out of the untouched (unchanged) part of us – i.e. what is not transformed by God.

D. NASB: “and dwelt.” Greek: eskēnōsen. Strong’s: 4637: to have one’s tent, dwell. https://biblehub.com/lexicon/john/1-14.htm

1. 4637. skénoó. https://biblehub.com/greek/4637.htm

2. Strong’s Concordance
skénoó: to have one’s tent, dwell
Phonetic Spelling: (skay-no’-o)
Definition: to have one’s tent, dwell
Usage: I dwell as in a tent, encamp, have my tabernacle.

3. HELPS Word-studies
Cognate: 4637 skēnóō – properly, to pitch or live in a tent, “denoting much more than the mere general notion of dwelling” (M. Vincent). For the Christian, 4637 (skēnóō) is dwelling in intimate communion with the resurrected Christ – even as He who Himself lived in unbroken communion with the Father during the days of His flesh (Jn 1:14). See 4638 (skēnōma).

E. NASB: “among.” Greek: en. Strong’s: 1722: in, on, at, by, with. https://biblehub.com/lexicon/john/1-14.htm

1. 1722. en. https://biblehub.com/greek/1722.htm

2. Strong’s Concordance
en: in, on, at, by, with
Phonetic Spelling: (en)
Definition: in, on, at, by, with
Usage: in, on, among.

3. HELPS Word-studies
1722 en (a preposition) – properly, in (inside, within); (figuratively) “in the realm (sphere) of,” as in the condition (state) in which something operates from the inside (within).

F. NASB: “us, and we saw.” Greek: etheasametha. Strong’s: 2300: to behold, look upon. https://biblehub.com/lexicon/john/1-14.htm

1. 2300. theaomai. https://biblehub.com/greek/2300.htm

2. Strong’s Concordance
theaomai: to behold, look upon
Phonetic Spelling: (theh-ah’-om-ahee)
Definition: to behold, look upon
Usage: I see, behold, contemplate, look upon, view; I see, visit.

3. HELPS Word-studies
2300 theáomai (from tháomai, “to gaze at a spectacle”) – properly, gaze on (contemplate) as a spectator; to observe intently, especially to interpret something (grasp its significance); to see (concentrate on) so as to significantly impact (influence) the viewer.
[2300 (theáomai) is the root of 2302 /théatron (“spectacle in a theatre”), the root of the English term, “theatre.”]

G. NASB: “His glory. Glory.” Greek: doxan. Strong’s: 1391: opinion (always good in N.T.), hence praise, honor, glory. https://biblehub.com/lexicon/john/1-14.htm

1. 1391. doxa. https://biblehub.com/greek/1391.htm

2. Strong’s Concordance
doxa: opinion (always good in N.T.), hence praise, honor, glory
Phonetic Spelling: (dox’-ah)
Definition: opinion (always good in NT), praise, honor, glory
Usage: honor, renown; glory, an especially divine quality, the unspoken manifestation of God, splendor.

3. HELPS Word-studies
1391 dóksa (from dokeō, “exercising personal opinion which determines value”) – glory. 1391 /dóksa (“glory”) corresponds to the OT word, kabo (OT 3519, “to be heavy”). Both terms convey God’s infinite, intrinsic worth (substance, essence).
[1391 (dóksa) literally means “what evokes good opinion, i.e. that something has inherent, intrinsic worth” (J. Thayer).]

H. NASB: “as of the only begotten.” Greek: monogenous. Strong’s: 3439: only begotten. https://biblehub.com/lexicon/john/1-14.htm

1. 3439. monogenés. https://biblehub.com/greek/3439.htm

2. Strong’s Concordance
monogenés: only begotten
Phonetic Spelling: (mon-og-en-ace’)
Definition: only begotten
Usage: only, only-begotten; unique.

3. HELPS Word-studies
3439 monogenḗs (from 3411 /misthōtós, “one-and-only” and 1085 /génos, “offspring, stock”) – properly, one-and-only; “one of a kind” – literally, “one (monos) of a class, genos” (the only of its kind).

I. NASB: “from the Father.” Greek: patros. Strong’s: 3962: a father. https://biblehub.com/lexicon/john/1-14.htm

1. 3962. patér. https://biblehub.com/greek/3962.htm

2. Strong’s Concordance
patér: a father
Phonetic Spelling: (pat-ayr’)
Definition: a father
Usage: father, (Heavenly) Father, ancestor, elder, senior.

3. HELPS Word-studies
3962 patḗr – father; one who imparts life and is committed to it; a progenitor, bringing into being to pass on the potential for likeness.
3962 /patḗr (“father”) is used of our heavenly Father. He imparts life, from physical birth to the gift of eternal life through the second birth (regeneration, being born again). Through ongoing sanctification, the believer more and more resembles their heavenly Father – i.e. each time they receive faith from Him and obey it, which results in their unique glorification.
[3962 /patḗr (“father”) refers to a begetter, originator, progenitor – one in “intimate connection and relationship” (Gesenius). Just as in the NT, the OT never speaks of universal fatherhood of God toward men (see. G. B. Steven’s concession, The Theology of the New Testament, p 70; see p 68) (TWOT 1, 6).
For more on the Fatherhood of God see: Bruce, F. F., NIDNTT 2. 655-656; Burton, E. de W., The Epistle to the Galatians (Edinburgh: Clark 1921) 384-392; Jeremias, J., The Prayers of Jesus (ET) (London: SCM, 1967) 11-65.]

J. NASB: “full.” Greek: plērēs. Strong’s: 4134: full. https://biblehub.com/lexicon/john/1-14.htm

1. 4134. plérés. https://biblehub.com/greek/4134.htm

2. Strong’s Concordance
plérés: full
Phonetic Spelling: (play’-race)
Definition: full
Usage: full, abounding in, complete, completely occupied with.

3. HELPS Word-studies
Cognate: 4134 plḗrēs (an adjective) – full; used of being full of the presence of the Lord (His provisions) which is the definition of a full life. See 4130 (plēthō). Being “full” (4134 /plḗrēs) brings God’s wisdom, grace and power (Ac 6:3,8).

K. NASB: “of grace.” Greek: charitos. Strong’s: 5485: grace, kindness. https://biblehub.com/lexicon/john/1-14.htm

1. 5485. charis. https://biblehub.com/greek/5485.htm

2. Strong’s Concordance
charis: grace, kindness
Phonetic Spelling: (khar’-ece)
Definition: grace, kindness
Usage: (a) grace, as a gift or blessing brought to man by Jesus Christ, (b) favor, (c) gratitude, thanks, (d) a favor, kindness.

3. HELPS Word-studies
Cognate: 5485 xáris (another feminine noun from xar-, “favor, disposed to, inclined, favorable towards, leaning towards to share benefit”) – properly, grace. 5485 (xáris) is preeminently used of the Lord’s favor – freely extended to give Himself away to people (because He is “always leaning toward them”).
5485 /xáris (“grace”) answers directly to the Hebrew (OT) term 2580 /Kaná (“grace, extension-toward”). Both refer to God freely extending Himself (His favor, grace), reaching (inclining) to people because He is disposed to bless (be near) them.
[5485 (xáris) is sometimes rendered “thanks” but the core-idea is “favor, grace” (“extension towards”).]

L. NASB: “and truth.” Greek: alētheias. Strong’s: 225: truth. https://biblehub.com/lexicon/john/1-14.htm

1. 225. alétheia. https://biblehub.com/greek/225.htm

2. Strong’s Concordance
alétheia: truth
Phonetic Spelling: (al-ay’-thi-a)
Definition: truth
Usage: truth, but not merely truth as spoken; truth of idea, reality, sincerity, truth in the moral sphere, divine truth revealed to man, straightforwardness.

3. HELPS Word-studies
225 alḗtheia (from 227 /alēthḗs, “true to fact”) – properly, truth (true to fact), reality.
[In ancient Greek culture, 225 (alḗtheia) was synonymous for “reality” as the opposite of illusion, i.e. fact.]

VI. Summary.

A. The information that is contained in this one verse of scripture can be discussed, without an ending to the discussion. Therefore, I will add some thoughts of summary that I think can be useful in the world of disbelief in Christ, as being, “God,” and in particular of Christ being, “God with us” [Isa 7:14 (742 B.C.); Mt 1:23 (5-4 B.C.)].

B. Old Testament Prophetic Scriptures Told Of The Coming Of Christ. (Jews For Jesus)

https://jewsforjesus.org/answers/top-40-most-helpful-messianic-prophecies/

1. The Messiah would be born of a virgin
Hebrew Scriptures reference: Isaiah 7:14
New Testament citations: Matthew 1:22–23, Luke 1:31–35

2. The Messiah would come according to a timetable
Hebrew Scriptures reference: Daniel 9:24–27
New Testament citations: Matthew 24:15-16, Mark 13:14-15, Galatians 4:4

3. The Messiah would be preceded by Elijah the prophet
Hebrew Scriptures reference: Malachi 4:5–6 [Hebrew Bible, verses 3:23–24]
New Testament citations: Matthew 11:14–15, Matthew 16:14, Matthew 17:9–13, Mark 6:14–16, Mark 9:11–13, Luke 1:16–17, John 1:21

a. He [John the Baptist] will turn many of the children of Israel to the Lord their God, and he will go before him in the spirit and power of Elijah, to turn the hearts of the fathers to the children, and the disobedient to the wisdom of the just, to make ready for the Lord a people prepared.” (Luke 1:16–17)

b. Luke here is explicit that John came “in the spirit and power of Elijah”– he is not a reappearance of the actual, literal prophet. Alluding to Malachi 4:5–6 (Hebrew, 3:23–24), he shows that John began to effect reconciliation (through his baptism of repentance) and in that way prepared the people for the coming of Jesus. This explains why in John’s gospel, John the Baptist denies being Elijah.

4. The Messiah would be born in Bethlehem
Hebrew Scriptures reference: Micah 5:2 [Hebrew Bible verse 1]
New Testament citations: Matthew 2:1–6, John 7:40–43

5. The Messiah would be a descendant of David
Hebrew Scriptures reference: 2 Samuel 7:12–16
New Testament citations: Matthew 1:1, Luke 1:32-33, Acts 15:15-16, Hebrews 1:5

6. The Messiah would be the Wonderful Counselor, Mighty God, Everlasting Father, and Prince of Peace
Hebrew Scriptures reference: Isaiah 9:6–7 [Hebrew Bible 9:5-6]
New Testament citations: Luke 1:32-33, Luke 1:79, John 14:27, Acts 10:36, Romans 9:5, Philippians 4:7, Colossians 2:3, 2 Thessalonians 3:3

7. The Messiah would be the seed of the woman
Hebrew Scriptures reference: Genesis 3:15
New Testament citations: Romans 16:20, Galatians 4:4, Hebrews 2:14; Revelation 12:9, 17

8. The Messiah would be called a Nazarene
Hebrew Scriptures reference: Isaiah 11:1, Isaiah 53:3
New Testament citations: Matthew 2:23

C. Consider the following verses that identify Christ as being God.
Christ has always been, “and has always been God.” Lk 1:47. John 1:1, 5:18. Tit 2:13. Heb 13:8.
The world was created by Christ. John 1:3, 10. Col 1:16. 1 Cor 8:6. Heb 1:2
Christ takes away the sin of the world. John 1:29. 1 John 1:9. Eph 1:7. Col 3:13. Mk 2:10. Mt 9:2-8.
Christ and the Father are one. John 10:30; 14:7, 9, 11.

D. Consider thoughts of key theologians in regard to John 1:14.

1. John is saying that Jesus, who was born in Bethlehem, who was known as Jesus of Nazareth, always was, is, and ever shall be God. (Vine’s Expository Bible Notes)

2. Made flesh indicates the incarnation of God the Son. The use of flesh contradicts the Gnostic heresy that God could not be united with human flesh, which was seen as evil. Dwelt among us: John uses the word for “tabernacled,” here translated “dwelt.” The Old Testament tabernacle was where God dwelt among the Jews in the wilderness. In this context, God is dwelling in the person of Jesus Christ. We beheld his glory: Perhaps John refers to the shekinah glory which appeared in the tabernacle of the Old Testament. The expression signifies the visible manifestation of God. John later uses glory to refer to Jesus’ life (2:11), death, and resurrection (12:23). (KJV Study Bible)

3. The Word became flesh. God became human. Jesus took on flesh (“incarnation”) without ceasing to be God (see Phil 2:6–7). The mere formulation scarcely does justice to this most staggering of assertions. made his dwelling. Pitched his tabernacle; lived in his tent. This recalls Israel’s “tabernacle” in which God dwelled among his people in the wilderness (Exod 25:8–9; 40:34–35). Now God dwells among his people in a more personal way: in the Word become flesh. See “Temple.” We have seen his glory. This verse alludes to Exod 33:12—34:28, where God’s glory is supremely his goodness (Exod 33:18–19). John and others with eyes of faith saw Jesus display his glory on earth (2:11; Luke 9:32). See “The Glory of God.” one and only Son. See “Sonship.” full of grace and truth. Describes Jesus’ “glory” and parallels “love and faithfulness” in Exod 34:6 (also in Ps 26:3; Prov 16:6), which describes the nature of the goodness that is God’s glory. “Love” (Hebrew ḥesed) refers to a gracious covenant love (see “Love and Grace”), and “faithfulness” (Hebrew ʾĕmet), when referring to words, means faithful words, truth. The glory that Moses saw in Exod 33:12—34:28 is the same glory that John saw in the Word made flesh. (NIV Biblical Theology Study Bible)

4. the Word became flesh. While Christ as God was uncreated and eternal (see notes on v. 1), the word “became” emphasizes Christ’s taking on humanity (cf. Heb. 1:1–3; 2:14–18). This reality is surely the most profound ever because it indicates that the Infinite became finite; the Eternal was conformed to time; the Invisible became visible; the supernatural One reduced Himself to the natural. In the incarnation, however, the Word did not cease to be God but became God in human flesh, i.e., undiminished deity in human form as a man (1 Tim. 3:16). (MacArthur Study Bible)

VII. Let’s consider Life, as it is discussed in the following news articles.

Home

Congressman Jerry Nadler: “God’s Will is No Concern of This Congress”

VIII. Sources Of Information. I will put this statement of sources of information on each of my articles.

A. Credential information for named individuals in this article can be found on my Theologians website Page.

B. The following sources of information provide great teaching ideas; I encourage everyone to purchase these materials. The following study Bibles are two of the ones that I most often consult, both of which are key to the study of eschatology.

1. Ryrie Study Bible.

2. Scofield Study Bible.

C. Everyone reads something that someone else has written. Therefore, it is important to choose authors whom have proven to be knowledgeable of the things that they have written, and who also have a high degree of acceptance from their peers. In addition to the sources of information that are noted in the above paragraph, there are many other theologians for whom I have great respect, and whose works I use for reference in the articles that I write. A list of such theologians, along with their credentials, can be found on this website’s Page of my sources of information. On that sources page you can also find linked information that tells of ministry works of many of those trusted theologians.

IX. Please follow this site.

Salvation In Christ – The Book Of John – 1:10-1:13 – 26 A.D.

I. Video.

A. Carman – Serve The Lord (Raising The Standard). CarmanTvOfficialSite. Jun 27, 2012.

B. Carmello Dominic Licciardello, who was lovingly known as “Carman,” passed from this life to be with his heavenly Father a week ago, on February 16, 2021. The songs that Carman wrote and sang had a great degree of Spiritual relevance within them. I was not particularly looking for any of Carman’s songs to accompany this article; it just happened that I came across a good number of the songs of Carman that have always been so very meaningful to me. I trust that you, too, will find the intimacy of worship in this opening video that brought tears to my eyes, as I played this song, “over and over.” Carman was a master minister of evangelism through his music; he will be greatly missed.

II. Preview. One of the most trusted of all theologians, of whom I include in my research for the articles that I write, is Dr. J. Dwight Pentecost (1915-2014; his credential information can be found on my page of sources of information). Even as highly educated on matters of Scripture, as Dr. Pentecost proved himself to be, he stressed the importance of not only, “knowing about God,” but also “knowing God.” As I was contemplating the makeup of this article, I was experiencing a strong sense for the need to draw closer in my personal relationship and daily walk with God. Along with my daily Bible readings, I have recently included, “In Pursuit of God” (A.W. Tozer), and “Jesus Christ Our Lord” (John F. Walvoord). I never want to lose the thought of the arms of Christ being wrapped around me, holding me ever so closely to Him. The Christian music videos that I watch, and include in my articles, are also tools that remind me of the love that God has for me, as well as for all of mankind (John 3:16). In this article, we will discuss those of mankind that, in spite of the sacrifice of Christ on the cross, have rejected God’s love. We will also discuss those whom have come to saving faith in Christ, as they look back to the death and sacrifice of Christ on the cross (Luke 23:46; 2 Cor 5:21). Competent commentary will add meaningful thought to the verses of this article.

III. Scripture Text. John 1:10-13 (26 A.D.)

Christian Standard Bible

10 He was in the world, and the world was created through him, and yet the world did not recognize him. 11 He came to his own, and his own people did not receive him. 12 But to all who did receive him, he gave them the right to be children of God, to those who believe in his name, 13 who were born, not of natural descent, or of the will of the flesh, or of the will of man, but of God.

IV. Scripture Comments.

A. The Rejection Of Christ. John 1:10-11.

1. Verse 10. “did not know him.” The world did not recognize Jesus as the Christ, the Creator, the Savior, etc. 1

2. Verse 11. “He came to His own.” (thing or place – i.e., the world that He made); His “own” (people – the Jews) “did not receive Him.” 1

3. Verse 11. Receive here means “to receive with favor,” and implies “welcome.” Instead of a welcome mat, Jesus had a door slammed in His face. The themes of rejection and reception (v. 12) introduced in the prologue (1:1–18) appear again and again throughout the Gospel of John. 2

4. Verse 11. ” His own . . . His own.” The first usage of “His own” most likely refers to the world of mankind in general, while the second refers to the Jewish nation. As Creator, the world belongs to the Word as His property, but the world did not even recognize Him due to spiritual blindness (cf. also v. 10). John used the second occurrence of “His own” in a more narrow sense to refer to Jesus’ own physical lineage, the Jews. Although they possessed the Scriptures that testified of His person and coming, they still did not accept Him (Is. 65:2, 3; Jer. 7:25). This theme of the Jewish rejection of their promised Messiah receives special attention in John’s Gospel (12:37–41). 3

B. The Acceptance Of Christ. John 1:12-13.

1. Verse 12. “even to those whom believe in His Name.” An explanation of what it means to “receive” Him. 1

2. Verse 12. The phrase “believe in His name” occurs three times in the Gospel of John (1:12; 2:23; 3:18). Name does not refer to the term by which He is called, but to what His name stands for—the Lord is salvation (see Ex. 3:14, 15). In this context, the phrase means to believe that Jesus is the Word, the life, and the Light—that is, He is the Christ, the Son of God (20:31). “To them He gave the right” refers to the legitimate entitlement to the position of children of God. By believing, undeserving sinners can become full members of God’s family. 2

2. Verse 13. The new birth is supernatural and therefore completely distinct from natural birth. It is “not of blood” (lit., bloods), i.e., contains no human element; nor does it lie within the scope of human achievement (it is not “of the will of the flesh” or “man.”) 1

3. Verse 13. “born …of God:” This new spiritual birth is not of blood, that is, by physical generation or by parents. Nor is the new birth of the will of the flesh, that is, by personal effort. Neither is the birth of the will of man, that is, something done by another individual. Each person must individually trust Jesus Christ for eternal life. It is a gift to be received (4:10, 14), not a reward achieved through any human effort. 1

4. Verses 12-13. These verses stand in contrast to vv. 10, 11. John softens the sweeping rejection of Messiah by stressing a believing remnant. This previews the book since the first 12 chapters stress the rejection of Christ, while chaps. 13–21 focus on the believing remnant who received Him. 3

V. Summary.

The world in which Christ presented Himself, is the world in which He created. Those, who “did not recognize Him, (vs 10)” were Jews; they should have known Him as Messiah. The Old Testament scriptures told of the coming of Christ, but the masses of God’s Chosen People (Deu 14:2) were not taught those prophetic verses in such a way that would have them receive their Savior and Lord. Christ sent His disciples, not to the Gentiles or Samaritans, but to “the lost sheep of the house of Israel (the Jews; Matt 10:5-7). John 4:3 tells of a travel of Christ: “He left Judea and went away again into Galilee. 4 And He had to pass through Samaria. 5 So He *came to a city of Samaria.” The Samaritans were half-breed Jews. They were of the northern kingdom of Israel, and intermarried with Gentiles. In Samaria, Christ met a woman of Samaria (4:7), to whom He presented Himself as Christ (4:26). The Samaritan woman believed that Christ was the Messiah (4:39), “From that city many of the Samaritans believed in Him because of the word of the woman who testified.” Those Jews, and half-breed Samarian Jews, who came to faith in Christ as Messiah, achieved the promise of John 3:16, and avoided the condemnation of John 3:18. The new birth (John 3:3) of those first century Jews, including the half-breed Samaritans, as well as all whom have come to saving faith in Christ since then, caused them to enter into eternal life through Christ at the time of belief in Christ (John 17:3, “this is eternal life, that they may know You”), which is spiritual (John 3:8) and unending (John 5:24, 10:28-31, 20:30-31). The message of Christ has “gone viral” spiritually (John 1:9) throughout the world, as well as by “word of mouth and other methods of communication (Matthew 28:19-20 and Acts 1:8). People in our world today are held to the same standards that Christ held for first century Jews, as He spoke the words of John 3:3, 3:16, and 3:18). Still, millions of people around the world have not come to saving faith in Christ, and refuse to accept Him as their Savior and Lord. The Great Commission of Christ to His apostles is of no less importance today, than when those Words of our Lord were spoken almost twenty-one hundred years ago. The lake of fire will not go away, and is waiting for those who have not been born again (Rev 20:15).

VI. Let’s consider Life, as it is discussed in the following news articles.

https://www.lifenews.com/

https://www.lifenews.com/2021/02/22/for-every-adoption-referral-planned-parenthood-makes-it-kills-133-babies-in-abortions/

VII. Sources Of Information. I will put this statement of sources of information on each of my articles.

A. Credential information for named individuals in this article can be found on my Theologians website Page.

B. The following sources of information provide great teaching ideas; I encourage everyone to purchase these materials.

1. Ryrie Study Bible.

2. NKJV Study Bible.

3. MacArthur Study Bible.

C. Everyone reads something that someone else has written. Therefore, it is important to choose authors whom have proven to be knowledgeable of the things that they have written, and who also have a high degree of acceptance from their peers. In addition to the sources of information that are noted in the above paragraph, there are many other theologians for whom I have great respect, and whose works I use for reference in the articles that I write. A list of such theologians, along with their credentials, can be found on this website’s Page of my sources of information. On that sources page you can also find linked information that tells of ministry works of many of those trusted theologians.

VIII. Please follow this site.

Salvation In Christ – The Book Of John – 1:3-1:9 – 26 A.D.

I. Video. Sweet Beulah Land [Live]. Dec 13, 2012. Gaither Music TV. Squire Parsons. This video was recorded in 1993. A number of the singers that are seen in the video have gone on to be with the Lord.

II. Preview. This article will address key factors of the biblical text in which we will be studying. The opening video presents a song that addresses the hope of those who know Christ as their Lord and Savior, with that expectant hope of not being confined to a grave, but of a home going and spending eternity with Christ (2 Cor 5:8, 15:50-54). In this article, we will identify key facts of scripture which show that only Christ could have been the author of all aspects of creation, therefore, Christ is God (John 1:1-2 from previous article included). We will study those verses by commentary. We will also study key verses via Greek Lexicon. An analysis of our conclusions will consider the love of God that escapes no one. We will close this article with links to Life News.

III. Scriptures. John 1:3-9 – New American Standard Bible 26 A.D.

A. John 1:3-5 – The Preincarnate Work Of Christ.

3 All things came into being through Him, and apart from Him not even one thing came into being that has come into being. 4 In Him was life, and the life was the Light of mankind. 5 And the Light shines in the darkness, and the darkness did not comprehend it.

B. John 1:6-8 – The Witness John the Baptist.

6 A man came, one sent from God, and his name was John. 7 He came as a witness, to testify about the Light, so that all might believe through him. 8 He was not the Light, but he came to testify about the Light. (My comment: John The Baptist was not the writer of the Book of John; the Apostle John was the writer.)

C. John 1:9 – The Light Of The World.

9 This was the true Light that, coming into the world, enlightens every person.

IV. Commentary. Ryrie Study Bible (RSB). MacArthur Study Bible (MSB).

A. 1:3. “All things came into being through Him.” Christ was active in the work of creation of God (Col 1:16). (RSB)

B. 1:3. All things were made through Him. Jesus Christ was God the Father’s agent involved in creating everything in the universe (Col. 1:16, 17; Heb. 1:2). (MSB)

C. 1:4-5. “life … Light.” These two distinctive words especially associated with John (8:12; 9:5; 11:25; 14:6). “Light” in John implies revelation that discloses the “life” that is in Christ and brings into judgment those who refuse it (3:19). “Life” denotes salvation and deliverance, based on Christ’s atonement. “the darkness did not comprehend it.” Better, the darkness did not overcome the light. (RSB) (My note. Grasp may be used for comprehend.”) (RSB)

D. 1:4-5 life . . . light . . . darkness. John introduces the reader to contrastive themes that occur throughout the gospel. “Life” and “light” are qualities of the Word that are shared not only among the Godhead (5:26) but also by those who respond to the gospel message regarding Jesus Christ (8:12; 9:5; 10:28; 11:25; 14:6). John uses the word “life” about 36 times in his gospel, far more than any other NT book. It refers not only in a broad sense to physical and temporal life that the Son imparted to the created world through His involvement as the agent of creation (v. 3), but especially to spiritual and eternal life imparted as a gift through belief in Him (3:15; 17:3; Eph. 2:5). In Scripture “light” and “darkness” are very familiar symbols. Intellectually, “light” refers to biblical truth, while “darkness” refers to error or falsehood (cf. Ps. 119:105; Prov. 6:23). Morally, “light” refers to holiness or purity (1 John 1:5), while “darkness” refers to sin or wrongdoing (3:19; 12:35, 46; Rom. 13:11–14; 1 Thess. 5:4–7; 1 John 1:6; 2:8–11). “Darkness” has special significance in relationship to Satan (and his demonic cohorts) who rules the present spiritually dark world (1 John 5:19) as the “prince of the power of the air” promoting spiritual darkness and rebellion against God (Eph. 2:2). John uses the term “darkness” 14 times (8 in the gospel and 6 in 1 John) out of its 17 occurrences in the NT, making it almost an exclusive Johannine word. In John, “light” and “life” have their special significance in relationship to the Lord Jesus Christ, the Word (v. 9; 9:5; 1 John 1:5–7; 5:12, 20).

E. 1:5. comprehend. The better meaning of this term in context is “overcome.” Darkness is not able to overcome or conquer the light. Just as a single candle can overcome a room filled with darkness, so also the powers of darkness are overcome by the person and work of the Son through His death on the cross (cf. 19:11a). (MSB)

F. 1:6. “John (the Baptizer).” His role, made clear in verse 8, was simply as a witness to the Light. (RSB)

G. 1:6. The name “John” always refers to John the Baptist in this Gospel, never to the apostle John. (MSB)

H. 1:6. sent from God. As forerunner to Jesus, John was to bear witness to Him as the Messiah and Son of God. With John’s ministry, the “400 silent years” between the end of the OT and the beginning of the NT period, during which God had given no revelation, ended. John. The name “John” always refers to John the Baptist in this Gospel, never to the apostle John. The writer of this gospel calls him merely “John” without using the phrase “the Baptist,” unlike the other Gospels which use the additional description to identify him (Matt. 3:1; Mark 6:14; Luke 7:20). Moreover, John the apostle (or, son of Zebedee) never identified himself directly by name in the gospel even though he was one of the 3 most intimate associates of Jesus (Matt. 17:1). Such silence argues strongly that John the apostle authored the gospel and that his readers knew full well that he composed the gospel that bears his name. For more on John the Baptist, cf. Matt. 3:1–6; Mark 1:2–6; Luke 1:5–25, 57–80. (MSB)

I. 1:7. witness . . . bear witness. The terms “witness” or “bear witness” receive special attention in this gospel, reflecting the courtroom language of the OT where the truth of a matter was to be established on the basis of multiple witnesses (8:17, 18; cf. Deut. 17:6; 19:15). Not only did John the Baptist witness regarding Jesus as Messiah and Son of God (vv. 19–34; 3:27–30; 5:35), but there were other witnesses: 1) the Samaritan woman (4:29); 2) the works of Jesus (10:25); 3) the Father (5:32–37); 4) the OT (5:39, 40); 5) the crowd (12:17); and 6) the Holy Spirit (15:26, 27). that all through him might believe. “Him” refers not to Christ but to John as the agent who witnessed to Christ. The purpose of his testimony was to produce faith in Jesus Christ as the Savior of the world. (MSB)

J.1:8. He was not that Light. While John the Baptist was the agent of belief, Jesus Christ is the object of belief. Although John’s person and ministry were vitally important (Matt. 11:11), he was merely the forerunner who announced the coming of the Messiah. Many years after John’s ministry and death, some still failed to understand John’s subordinate role to Jesus (Acts 19:1–3). (MSB)

K. 1:9. “enlightens every man.” Not that every man is redeemed automatically, for redemption comes through faith in the Savior (1:12). But, this light is available to all men. (RSB)

L. 1:9. “the true Light gives light to every man.” (MSB).

M. 1:9. the true Light . . . coming into the world. The alternate rendering in the translators’ note is the preferred translation. The words “coming into the world” would be better grammatically if attached to “light” rather than “every man” and thus translated “the true Light coming into the world gives light to every man.” This highlights the incarnation of Jesus Christ (v. 14; 3:16). which gives light to every man. Through God’s sovereign power, every man has enough light to be responsible. God has planted His knowledge in man through general revelation in creation and conscience. The result of general revelation, however, does not produce salvation but either leads to the complete light of Jesus Christ or produces condemnation in those who reject such “light” (see notes on Rom. 1:19, 20; 2:12–16). The coming of Jesus Christ was the fulfillment and embodiment of the light that God had placed inside the heart of man. the world. The basic sense of this Gr. word meaning “an ornament” is illustrated by the word “cosmetic” (1 Pet. 3:3). While the NT uses it a total of 185 times, John had a particular fondness for this term, using it 78 times in his gospel, 24 times in 1-3 John and 3 times in Revelation. John gives it several shades of meaning: 1) the physical created universe (v. 9; cf. v. 3; 21:24, 25); 2) humanity in general (3:16; 6:33, 51; 12:19); and 3) the invisible spiritual system of evil dominated by Satan and all that it offers in opposition to God, His Word, and His people (3:19; 4:42; 7:7; 14:17, 22, 27, 30; 15:18, 19; 16:8, 20, 33; 17:6, 9, 14; cf. 1 Cor. 1:21; 2 Pet. 1:4; 1 John 5:19). The latter concept is the significant new use that the term acquires in the NT and that predominates in John. Thus, in the majority of times that John uses the word, it has decidedly negative overtones. (MSB)

V. NASB Greek Lexicon. Strong’s Concordance And Numbers. HELPS Word-Studies.

A. 1:3. “All things.” pas.3956. https://biblehub.com/greek/3956.htm

1. Strong’s Concordance
pas: all, every
Definition: all, every
Usage: all, every. all, the whole, every kind of.

2. HELPS Word-studies
3956 pás – each, every; each “part(s) of a totality” (L & N, 1, 59.24).
3956 /pás (“each, every”) means “all” in the sense of “each (every) part that applies.” The emphasis of the total picture then is on “one piece at a time.” 365 (ananeóō) then focuses on the part(s) making up the whole – viewing the whole in terms of the individual parts.
[When 3956 (pás) modifies a word with the definite article it has “extensive-intensive” force – and is straightforward intensive when the Greek definite article is lacking.]

B. 1:3. “came into being.” 1096. ginomai. https://biblehub.com/greek/1096.htm

1. Strong’s Concordance
ginomai: to come into being, to happen, to become
Definition: to come into being, to happen, to become
Usage: I come into being, am born, become, come about, happen.

2. HELPS Word-studies
1096 gínomai – properly, to emerge, become, transitioning from one point (realm, condition) to another. 1096 (gínomai) fundamentally means “become” (becoming, became) so it is not an exact equivalent to the ordinary equative verb “to be” (is, was, will be) as with 1510 /eimí (1511 /eínai, 2258 /ēn).
1096 (ginomai) means “to become, and signifies a change of condition, state or place” (Vine, Unger, White, NT, 109).
M. Vincent, “1096 (gínomai) means to come into being/manifestation implying motion, movement, or growth” (at 2 Pet 1:4). Thus it is used for God’s actions as emerging from eternity and becoming (showing themselves) in time (physical space).

C. 1:3. “through.” 1223. dia. https://biblehub.com/greek/1223.htm

1. Strong’s Concordance
dia: through, on account of, because of
Definition: through, on account of, because of
Usage: (a) gen: through, throughout, by the instrumentality of, (b) acc: through, on account of, by reason of, for the sake of, because of.

2. HELPS Word-studies
1223 diá (a preposition) – properly, across (to the other side), back-and-forth to go all the way through, “successfully across” (“thoroughly”). 1223 (diá) is also commonly used as a prefix and lend the same idea (“thoroughly,” literally, “successfully” across to the other side).
[1223 (diá) is a root of the English term diameter (“across to the other side, through”). Before a vowel, dia is simply written di̓.]

D. 1:3. “Him, and apart.” 5565. chóris. https://biblehub.com/greek/5565.htm

1. Strong’s Concordance
chóris: separately, separate from
Definition: separately, separate from
Usage: apart from, separately from; without.

2. HELPS Word-studies
5565 xōrís (a preposition, also used as an adverb which is probably derived from 5561 /xṓra, “an open or detached space”) – properly, apart from, separated (“without”); (figuratively) detached, rendering something invalid or valid.

E. 1:3. “from Him nothing.” 3761. oude . https://biblehub.com/greek/3761.htm

1. Strong’s Concordance
oude: and not, neither
Definition: and not, neither
Usage: neither, nor, not even, and not.

2. HELPS Word-studies
3761 oudé (from 3756 /ou, “not” and 1161 /dé, “moreover”) – properly, moreover not, neither indeed, not even, nor even.

F. 1:3. “came into being that has come into being.” 1096. ginomai. https://biblehub.com/greek/1096.htm

See B. 1.3.

G. 1:4. “In Him was life, and the life.” 2222. zóé. https://biblehub.com/greek/2222.htm

1. Strong’s Concordance
zóé: life
Definition: life
Usage: life, both of physical (present) and of spiritual (particularly future) existence.

2. HELPS Word-studies
2222 zōḗ – life (physical and spiritual). All life (2222 /zōḗ), throughout the universe, is derived – i.e. it always (only) comes from and is sustained by God’s self-existent life. The Lord intimately shares His gift of life with people, creating each in His image which gives all the capacity to know His eternal life.

H. 1:4. “was the Light.” 5457. phós. https://biblehub.com/greek/5457.htm

1. Strong’s Concordance
phós: light
Definition: light
Usage: light, a source of light, radiance.

2. HELPS Word-studies
5457 phṓs (a neuter noun) – properly, light (especially in terms of its results, what it manifests); in the NT, the manifestation of God’s self-existent life; divine illumination to reveal and impart life, through Christ.

I. 1:4. “of men.” 444. anthrópos. https://biblehub.com/greek/444.htm

1. Strong’s Concordance
anthrópos: a man, human, mankind
Definition: a man, human, mankind
Usage: a man, one of the human race.

2. HELPS Word-studies
444 ánthrōpos – man, also the generic term for “mankind”; the human race; people, including women and men (Mt 4:19, 12:12, etc.).

J. 1:5. “The Light.” 5457. phós. https://biblehub.com/greek/5457.htm

1.Strong’s Concordance
phós: light
Definition: light
Usage: light, a source of light, radiance.

2. HELPS Word-studies
5457 phṓs (a neuter noun) – properly, light (especially in terms of its results, what it manifests); in the NT, the manifestation of God’s self-existent life; divine illumination to reveal and impart life, through Christ.

K. 1:5. “shines.” 5316. phainó. https://biblehub.com/greek/5316.htm

1. Strong’s Concordance
phainó: to bring to light, to cause to appear
Definition: to bring to light, to cause to appear
Usage: (a) act: I shine, shed light, (b) pass: I shine, become visible, appear, (c) I become clear, appear, seem, show myself as.

2. Strong’s Exhaustive Concordance
to shine, appear
Prolongation for the base of phos; to lighten (shine), i.e. Show (transitive or intransitive, literal or figurative) — appear, seem, be seen, shine, X think.
see GREEK phos

L. 1:5. “in the darkness, and the darkness.” 4653. skotia. https://biblehub.com/greek/4653.htm

1. Strong’s Concordance
skotia: darkness
Definition: darkness
Usage: darkness; fig: spiritual darkness.

2. HELPS Word-studies
Cognate: 4653 skotía (a feminine noun) – darkness, a brand of moral, spiritual obscurity (i.e. which blocks the light of God when faith is lacking). See also 4655 /skótos (“darkness”).

M. 1:5. “did not comprehend” (it). 2638. katalambanó. https://biblehub.com/greek/2638.htm

1. Strong’s Concordance
katalambanó: to lay hold of, seize
Definition: to lay hold of, seize
Usage: (a) I seize tight hold of, arrest, catch, capture, appropriate, (b) I overtake, (c) mid. aor: I perceived, comprehended

2. HELPS Word-studies
2638 katalambánō (from 2596 /katá, “down, according to,” which intensifies 2983 /lambánō, “aggressively take”) – properly, take hold of exactly, with decisive initiative (eager self-interest); to grasp something in a forceful (firm) manner; (figuratively) to apprehend (comprehend), “making it one’s own.”

N. 1:7. “might believe.” 4100. pisteuó. https://biblehub.com/greek/4100.htm

1. Strong’s Concordance
pisteuó: to believe, entrust
Definition: to believe, entrust
Usage: I believe, have faith in, trust in; pass: I am entrusted with.

2. HELPS Word-studies
4100 pisteúō (from 4102 /pístis, “faith,” derived from 3982 /peíthō, “persuade, be persuaded”) – believe (affirm, have confidence); used of persuading oneself (= human believing) and with the sacred significance of being persuaded by the Lord (= faith-believing). Only the context indicates whether 4100 /pisteúō (“believe”) is self-serving (without sacred meaning), or the believing that leads to/proceeds from God’s inbirthing of faith.

O. 1:9. “into the world.” 2889. kosmos. https://biblehub.com/greek/2889.htm

1. Strong’s Concordance
kosmos: order, the world
Definition: order, the world
Usage: the world, universe; worldly affairs; the inhabitants of the world; adornment.

2. HELPS Word-studies
2889 kósmos (literally, “something ordered”) – properly, an “ordered system” (like the universe, creation); the world.
[The English term “cosmetic” is derived from 2889 /kósmos, i.e. the order (“ensemble”) used of treating the face as a whole.]

P. 1:9. “enlightens.” 5461. phótizó. https://biblehub.com/greek/5461.htm

1. Strong’s Concordance
phótizó: to shine, give light
Definition: to shine, give light
Usage: (a) I light up, illumine, (b) I bring to light, make evident, reveal.

2. HELPS Word-studies
Cognate: 5461 phōtízō (from 5457 /phṓs, “light”) – properly, enlighten; (figuratively) God sharing His life, exposing and overcoming darkness – like the ignorance (prejudice) caused by sin. See 5457 (phōs).

Q. 1:9. “every.” pas.3956. https://biblehub.com/greek/3956.htm

1. Strong’s Concordance
pas: all, every
Definition: all, every
Usage: all, every. all, the whole, every kind of.

2. HELPS Word-studies
3956 pás – each, every; each “part(s) of a totality” (L & N, 1, 59.24).
3956 /pás (“each, every”) means “all” in the sense of “each (every) part that applies.” The emphasis of the total picture then is on “one piece at a time.” 365 (ananeóō) then focuses on the part(s) making up the whole – viewing the whole in terms of the individual parts.

R. 1:9. “man.” 444. anthrópos. https://biblehub.com/greek/444.htm

1. Strong’s Concordance
anthrópos: a man, human, mankind
Definition: a man, human, mankind
Usage: a man, one of the human race.

2. HELPS Word-studies
444 ánthrōpos – man, also the generic term for “mankind”; the human race; people, including women and men (Mt 4:19, 12:12, etc.).

VI. Analysis.

A. The facts and details of this article are worthy of study and restudy. A comfort factor for all human beings comes from verse 9: “This was the true Light that, coming into the world, enlightens every person.” Every person” is easy to understand. See NASB Greek Lexicon. Strong’s Concordance And Numbers. HELPS Word-Studies, “V.Q.1:9.” . “The emphasis of the total picture then is on “one piece at a time.” Each and every human being is a total picture of humanity. “One piece at a time” (of humanity) receives the Light of Christ. The Light of Christ is restrictive to no one, and evades no one. We will go deeper into this reasoning when we study John 3:16.

B. The following scriptures tell of God’s desire for all of mankind to be saved.

1. 1 Timothy 2:3-4
New American Standard Bible 1995

3 This is good and acceptable in the sight of God our Savior, 4 who desires all men to be saved and to come to the knowledge of the truth.

2. 2 Peter 3:9
New American Standard Bible 1995

9 The Lord is not slow about His promise, as some count slowness, but is patient toward you, not wishing for any to perish but for all to come to repentance.

3. Romans 8:38-39
New American Standard Bible 1995

38 For I am convinced that neither death, nor life, nor angels, nor principalities, nor things present, nor things to come, nor powers, 39 nor height, nor depth, nor any other created thing, will be able to separate us from the love of God, which is in Christ Jesus our Lord.

VII. Let’s consider Life, as it is discussed in the following news articles.

Home

Joe Biden Wont “Speak Out Against” Uyghur Genocide in China Because It’s Their “Cultural Norm”

VIII. Sources Of Information. I will put this statement of sources of information on each of my future articles.

A. Credential information for named individuals in this article can be found on my Theologians website Page.

B. The following sources of information provide great teaching ideas; I encourage everyone to purchase these materials.

1. Ryrie Study Bible.

2. MacArthur Study Bible.

C. Everyone reads something that someone else has written. Therefore, it is important to choose authors whom have proven to be knowledgeable of the things that they have written, and who also have a high degree of acceptance from their peers. In addition to the sources of information that are noted in the above paragraph, there are many other theologians for whom I have great respect, and whose works I use for reference in the articles that I write. A list of such theologians, along with their credentials, can be found on this website’s Page of my sources of information. On that sources page you can also find linked information that tells of ministry works of many of those trusted theologians.

IX. Please follow this site.

Salvation In Christ – The Book Of John – 1:1-1:2

I. Introduction.

A. A Personal Thought. To me, the Book of John is a source document of “hard and fast” details of Scriptural Truth that relate to salvation and eternal life. It is my “go to” place when I want to find out something about the details of the person of Christ. The Book of John gives the definition of “eternal security,” which is found in John 17:3: “And this is eternal life, that they may know You, the only true God, and Jesus Christ whom You have sent.” In this passage, the word, “know,” is key.

1. The meaning of “know” (1097. ginṓskō”) relates to a personal relationship with someone. 1097 ginṓskō – properly, to know, especially through personal experience (first-hand acquaintance). 1097 /ginṓskō (“experientially know”) is used for example in Lk 1:34, “And Mary [a virgin] said to the angel, ‘How will this be since I do not know (1097 /ginṓskō = sexual intimacy) a man?'” (https://biblehub.com/greek/1097.htm).

2. In John 17:3 Christ is saying that eternal life comes from having a personal relationship with “God the Father,” through “God the Son,” being empowered by “God the Holy Spirit.” Such a relationship of intimacy comes from the new birth (John 3:3, 8), with the Spirit of God (Father, Son, Holy Spirit) dwelling within the spirit of the person whom has been born again (John 14:10-11, 16-17, 20; 16:13-14). To be born again means “to be born from above,” which is not a physical birth, but a spiritual “rebirth.”

3. In John 3:16, we see the words, “everyone who believes in Him will not perish, but have eternal life.” Belief in Christ is described as, “4100. pisteuó,” “I believe, have faith in, trust in.” (https://biblehub.com/greek/4100.htm).

4. The Words of Christ add assurity to a believer having eternal life, “for eternity.” Consider John 5:24: ““Truly, truly, I say to you, the one who hears My word, and believes Him who sent Me, has eternal life, and does not come into judgment, but has passed out of death into life.”

5. In John 10:28 we see even more assurance of eternal life for believers in Christ: “and I give them eternal life, and they will never perish; and no one will snatch them out of My hand” (no one can walk to salvation, and no one can walk away from salvation).

6. A purpose statement of the Book of John is found in John 20:31: “but these have been written so that you may believe that Jesus is the Christ, the Son of God; and that by believing you may have life in His name.”

7. The Book of John is a book of undeniable assurance of eternal life for those whom have come to a trusting belief in Christ as Lord and Savior. The message of the Book of John is, “hard and fast,” in its teaching of the Words of Christ continually saying that such believers are “eternally secure in Him.”

8. The following details will strengthen our understanding of the deity of Christ. It is important for us to know as much as we can about Christ; but, it is more important for us to have a John 17:3 “knowledge” of Christ, which is deep, personal, intimate. Much of that which we are learning from these studies is highly “academic.” But, we must never lose sight of the “spiritual” emphasis that our Lord desires of us.

B. Discernment And Application. 1

1. Discerning the Meaning | John 1:1

“Word.” Word can mean either words that are spoken (a statement or subject of discussion), an account or motive (Rom. 14:12), or Jesus Himself. When it refers to Jesus, it means either Jesus as the content of God’s revelation or Jesus as the reason behind the universe (John 1:1). In either case, it conveys the idea that Jesus is the living voice of God who communicates the full wisdom of God. He is God speaking, the breathing out of all God is and thinks so that mankind can understand and be saved.

2. Applying the Message | John 1

“God Came Down.” The Gospel of John presents Jesus Christ coming into this world from the bosom of His heavenly Father: “The Word became flesh and dwelt among us” (John 1:14). The first three Gospels present Jesus coming to earth from an earthly perspective. But the Gospel of John describes Jesus Christ coming into this world from a heavenly perspective.

II. Text. 2.

A. John 1:1-2 – New American Standard Bible – 26 A.D.

1 In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God, and the Word was God. 2 He was in the beginning with God.

B. Commentary. 3

1. 1:1

a. In the beginning. In contrast to 1 John 1:1 where John used a similar phrase (“from the beginning”) to refer to the starting point of Jesus’ ministry and gospel preaching, this phrase parallels Gen. 1:1 where the same phrase is used. John used the phrase in an absolute sense to refer to the beginning of the time-space-material universe.

b. was. The verb highlights the eternal preexistence of the Word, i.e., Jesus Christ. Before the universe began, the Second Person of the Trinity always existed; i.e., He always was (cf. 8:58). This word is used in contrast with the verb “was made” (or “were made”) in v. 3 which indicates a beginning in time. Because of John’s theme that Jesus Christ is the eternal God, the Second Person of the Trinity, he did not include a genealogy as Matthew and Luke did. While in terms of Jesus’ humanity, He had a human genealogy; in terms of His deity, He has no genealogy.

c. the Word. John borrowed the use of the term “Word” not only from the vocabulary of the OT but also from Gr. philosophy, in which the term was essentially impersonal, signifying the rational principle of “divine reason,” “mind,” or even “wisdom.” John, however, imbued the term entirely with OT and Christian meaning (e.g., Gen. 1:3 where God’s Word brought the world into being; Pss. 33:6; 107:20; Prov. 8:27 where God’s Word is His powerful self-expression in creation, wisdom, revelation, and salvation) and made it refer to a person, i.e., Jesus Christ. Greek philosophical usage, therefore, is not the exclusive background of John’s thought. Strategically, the term “Word” serves as a bridge-word to reach not only Jews but also the unsaved Greeks. John chose this concept because both Jews and Greeks were familiar with it.

d. the Word was with God. The Word, as the Second Person of the Trinity, was in intimate fellowship with God the Father throughout all eternity. Yet, although the Word enjoyed the splendors of heaven and eternity with the Father (Is. 6:1–13; cf. 12:41; 17:5), He willingly gave up His heavenly status, taking the form of a man, and became subject to the death of the cross (see notes on Phil. 2:6–8).

e. was God. The Gr. construction emphasizes that the Word had all the essence or attributes of deity, i.e., Jesus the Messiah was fully God (cf. Col. 2:9). Even in His incarnation when He emptied Himself, He did not cease to be God but took on a genuine human nature/body and voluntarily refrained from the independent exercise of the attributes of deity.

2. 1:2. 4

a. Verse 2 would appear to be a mere repetition of what has been said, but actually it is not. This verse teaches that Christ’s personality and deity were without beginning.

b. Christ did not become a person for the first time as the Babe of Bethlehem. Nor did He somehow become a god after His resurrection, as some teach today. He is God from all eternity.

III. Life.

A. Life is discussed throughout the Book of John, and throughout God’s Holy Word. Life, in today’s world, is also a common topic of discussion, as to its having value, or not having value, in an unborn baby.

B. Let’s consider Life, as it is shown in the following news article.

https://www.lifenews.com/2021/02/05/48-senate-democrats-just-voted-for-infanticide-showing-how-extreme-and-radical-they-are/

C. Consider Exodus 20:13, “You shall not murder.” (NASB)

D. Please know that this website will not skirt citing truth and error in “politically sensitive” issues.

IV. Credential information can be found on my website Page, “About Theologians.”

V. Video Details.

A. Gaither Vocal Band – The Florida Boys – When He Was On the Cross (I Was On His Mind) [Official Live]

B. Gaither Music TV. Dec 13, 2012.

VI. Sources Of Information. I will put this statement of sources of information on each of my future articles.

A. Credential information on named individuals in this article can be found on my website Page, “About Theologians.”

B. Footnotes. The following sources of information provide great teaching ideas; I encourage everyone to purchase these materials. Of the footnoted sources, I have been blessed by each of the sources of information.

1. Vines Expository Bible.

2. Bible Gateway.

3. MacArthur Study Bible.

4. Believer’s Bible Commentary.

C. Everyone reads something that someone else has written. Therefore, it is important to choose authors whom have proven to be knowledgeable of the things that they have written, and also have a high degree of acceptance from their peers. In addition to the sources of information that are footnoted in the above paragraph, there are many other theologians for whom I greatly respect, and whose works I use for reference in the articles that I write. A list of such theologians, along with their credentials, can be found on this website’s Page of my sources of information. On that sources page you can also find linked information that tells of ministry works of many of those trusted theologians.

VII. Please follow this site.

Salvation In Christ – The Book Of John – Introduction

I. Consider the situation in which we find ourselves today. Consider how we got here, and what we can do to make the world a better place to live.

A. Consider How Christians Started the Ivy League
https://www.forerunner.com/forerunner/X0101_Christians_Started_I.html

1. Harvard, Princeton, Yale, Dartmouth – all owe their origins to the gospel.

2. Probably no segment of American society has turned out a greater number of illustrious graduates than New England’s Ivy League. Labels like Harvard, Yale, Princeton, still carry their own mystique and a certain aura of elitism and prestige.

3. Yet perhaps it would surprise most to learn that almost every Ivy League school was established primarily to train ministers of the gospel – and to evangelize the Atlantic seaboard.

B. Consider Louisiana’s former Democrat Governor, Jimmie Davis.
https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/6370060/james-houston-davis

1. In 1944, he was elected as a Democrat the 47th Governor of Louisiana. He was again elected Governor of Louisiana, serving (1960-64). He is a member of the Southern Gospel Music Hall of Fame.

2. When we consider the Christian songs that Governor Davis wrote and sang, it is easy to see that he would not be welcome in the Democrat party today.
https://www.christianbook.com/gospel-favorites-the-best-jimmie-davis/pd/CD10394

3. Governor Davis even sang at the First Baptist Church, Baker, LA in 1976. (YouTube, Jimmie Davis – LIVE ! (c.1976).)

C. Consider the lack of Christians among the overall U.S. populace.

In U.S., Decline of Christianity Continues at Rapid Pace

1. The trends documented in Pew Research Center surveys closely resemble those found in the long-running General Social Survey (GSS), a project of the independent research organization NORC at the University of Chicago, with principal funding from the National Science Foundation. In GSS surveys conducted in the early 2000s (2000 to 2004), 80% of U.S. adults identified as Christians, including 54% who described themselves as Protestants and 25% who were Catholic. By the late 2010s, 71% of GSS respondents described themselves as Christians (48% Protestant, 23% Catholic). Over the same period, the GSS found that religious “nones” grew from 14% of the U.S. adult population to 22%.

2. Taken from the above survey, showing percentages of U.S. Christian declination from 1979 to the late 2010s, there is a much greater loss of Christians within the overall U.S. population. In the late 1970s, 90 percent of those in the U.S. claimed to be Christians, with 64% claiming to be Protestants, 26% claiming to be Catholics, and those claiming no religion were 7% of the U.S. population. By the end of the late 2010s, those claiming to be Christians fell to 71%, with 48% saying they were Protestants, 23% claiming to be Catholics, and 23% claiming no religion.

3. The results of the above stated General Social Survey should be taken very seriously. In paragraphs 2 and 3, we can see a major loss of Christians within the U.S. populace, and a great gain of those who claim to have no belief in Christ. The stated loss of Christian numbers in the U.S., and the remainder of the world, is affecting the decisions that are made in the governments of the world in a way that “things Christian” are being ignored and trampled upon by politicians who have no understanding of Christ.

D. When I was a young boy, I, and almost all of my friends went to Sunday School and Church. In school, my teachers talked about their church experiences. Church attendance was discussed favorably in TV sitcoms such as, “Leave It To Beaver, Father Knows Best, Andy Griffith, and others. “Jesus” wasn’t a hidden name. The Name of “God” was not taken “in vain” in TV programming.

E. At age ten, I walked the aisle at a church and made a statement of my faith in Christ as my Lord and Savior. Soon, thereafter, I was immersed in a baptismal pool of water, following the example of unbelievers whom had also made a statement of faith in Christ as their Lord and Savior (Acts 16:30-33).

II. What has happened to cause such an adverse affect in our world, as it relates to its not having a proper relationship with Christ?

A. Consider parental responsibilities that relate to children.

1. Deuteronomy 6:4-9 – New American Standard Bible

4 “Hear, Israel! The Lord is our God, the Lord is one! 5 And you shall love the Lord your God with all your heart and with all your soul and with all your strength. 6 These words, which I am commanding you today, shall be on your heart. 7 And you shall repeat them diligently to your sons and speak of them when you sit in your house, when you walk on the road, when you lie down, and when you get up. 8 You shall also tie them as a sign to your hand, and they shall be as frontlets on your forehead. 9 You shall also write them on the doorposts of your house and on your gates.

2. Parents are directed by God to teach the things of God to their children. Such teaching is to be “on-going.” Within the words of the above verse, it also shows parental responsibility to lead Holy lives, so that children will recognize that which is right, and that which is wrong. But, it is obvious from the world’s situation of sin, that children are not being taught the things of God.

B. Consider the commission that Christ has given to all believers in Christ.

1. Matthew 28:19 – New American Standard Bible

19 Go, therefore, and make disciples of all the nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father and the Son and the Holy Spirit,

2. Consider the word, “disciple.”
https://www.gotquestions.org/Christian-discipleship.html

a. By definition, a disciple is a follower, one who accepts and assists in spreading the doctrines of another. A Christian disciple is a person who accepts and assists in the spreading of the good news of Jesus Christ. Christian discipleship is the process by which disciples grow in the Lord Jesus Christ and are equipped by the Holy Spirit, who resides in our hearts, to overcome the pressures and trials of this present life and become more and more Christlike.

b. This process requires believers to respond to the Holy Spirit’s prompting to examine their thoughts, words and actions and compare them with the Word of God. This requires that we be in the Word daily—studying it, praying over it, and obeying it. In addition, we should always be ready to give testimony of the reason for the hope that is within us (1 Peter 3:15) and to disciple others to walk in His way. According to Scripture, being a Christian disciple involves personal growth characterized by the following:

3. Acts 1:8 – New American Standard Bible

8 but you will receive power when the Holy Spirit has come upon you; and you shall be My witnesses both in Jerusalem and in all Judea, and Samaria, and as far as the remotest part of the earth.

4. Consider the word, “witness,” as provided by The Merriam-Webster Dictionary
https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/witness

a. one who has personal knowledge of something

b. public affirmation by word or example of usually religious faith or conviction

5. When we consider the requirement to be a witness for Christ, and the requirements for being such a witness, it is obvious that many Christians are incapable of fulfilling our Lord’s command to tell others about Him. We must, therefore, take it upon ourselves to be the witness that Christ has commanded us to be. To have a personal knowledge of God’s Word is one thing; to have a conviction of what we have learned is something else. We must have a continual and deep study of God’s Word, accompanied by serious prayer, in order for us to be “sold out” in relation to that which we have learned about Christ, that which believe about Christ, and our relationship that we have with Christ.

6. Consider the result of witnesssing and leading an unbeliever to saving faith in Christ.

a. The unbeliever becomes born again, having a spirit as righteous as the Spirit of Christ (John 3:3, 3:8).
b. The unbeliever becomes a believer in Christ (John 3:16).
c. The former unbeliever has the Spirit of “Father, Son, Holy Spirit” dwelling within the born again spirit of the former unbeliever, forever (John 14:16, 17, 20), and shall spiritually teach the former unbeliever the things of Christ (John 14:26; 16:7-11).
d. The spirit of the former unbeliever now dwells within the Spirit of “Father, Son, Holy Spirit,” (John 14:20).
e. The former unbeliever’s spirit is “a new creation;” the former sinful nature has passed away (2 Cor 5:17).
f. The former unbeliever has a spirit as righteous as the Spirit of “Father, Son, Holy Spirit” (2 Cor 5:21).
g. The former unbeliever now has the Spirit of Christ dwelling within the former unbeliever’s spirit, which is their “hope of Glory,” which is an expectant hope (Col 1:28).
h. The former unbeliever’s spirit, which had been darkness (John 1:5, 9), has become “light” and dwells within the Spirit of God (1 John 1:5). The wording of 1 John 1:7 shows that the former unbeliever is constantly in a state of light, due to the work of Christ. That “saving and keeping” power of Christ is repeated in John 5:24, 10:28-29 and Jude 24. Here is the key to this discussion of the new birth. Once a person has been born again, that person can not be unborn.
i. Once we have been born again, we continue with a sin-battle until death. That battle is described by the Apostle Paul in Romans 7:14-20, as he explains “indwelling sin.” Satan will continue to tempt us until we die. Until we are born again, we have no “righteous spirit” prompting us to righteousness. Sinful thoughts come to us from Satan, prompting us to unrighteousness. At the same time, our born again spirit is prompting us to righteousness. Consider “body, soul and spirit.” Our body is our “eyes, nose and toes.” Our soul is our mind, our reasoning, our consciousness, our emotions.” Our spirit is the most inner part of us. I like to pound my hand on the area of my chest, just above my heart, and think that is the area that is “just above my spirit.” Our body, soul and spirit are mentioned in 1 Thes 5:23. At the time of our new birth, our spirit is eternally perfect, and in Christ.” Our body will continue its decay until death. Our soul (mind) will continue its decay, in function, and will continue its temptations to us, until death. But, the righteousness of God’s Spirit is stronger than Satan’s temptations.
j. The key to getting more “born again believers in Christ” in places of government is to lead more unbelievers to saving faith in Christ.

7. The scriptural tool, that I believe will help the most in accomplishing the mission that Christ has set before us, is the Book of John. The following information should provide an understanding of why I have such a deep belief in John’s Gospel as being a key source document that will help us to be knowledgeable of Christ in His deity, and that will give us the assurance and conviction that Thomas had when he said unto Christ, “My Lord and my God,” (John 20:28).

III. The Book Of John.

A. MacArthur Study Bible. Dr. John MacArthur.

1. John’s Gospel is the second (cf. Luke 1:1–4) that contains a precise statement regarding the author’s purpose (20:30, 31). He declares, “these are written that you may believe that Jesus is the Christ, the Son of God, and that believing you may have life in His name” (20:31). The primary purposes, therefore, are two-fold: evangelistic and apologetic.

2. Reinforcing the evangelistic purpose is the fact that the word “believe” occurs approximately 100 times in the gospel (the Synoptics use the term less than half as much). John composed his gospel to provide reasons for saving faith in his readers and, as a result, to assure them that they would receive the divine gift of eternal life (1:12).

3. The apologetic purpose is closely related to the evangelistic purpose. John wrote to convince his readers of Jesus’ true identity as the incarnate God-Man whose divine and human natures were perfectly united into one person who was the prophesied Christ (“Messiah”) and Savior of the world (e.g., 1:41; 3:16; 4:25, 26; 8:58). He organized his whole gospel around 8 “signs” or proofs that reinforce Jesus’ true identity leading to faith. The first half of his work centers around 7 miraculous signs selected to reveal Christ’s person and engender belief: 1) water made into wine (2:1–11); 2) the healing of the royal official’s son (4:46–54); 3) the healing of the lame man (5:1–18); 4) the feeding of a multitude (6:1–15); 5) walking on water (6:16–21); 6) healing of the blind man (9:1–41); and 7) the raising of Lazarus (11:1–57). The eighth sign is the miraculous catch of fish (21:6–11) after Jesus’ resurrection.

B. Holman New Testament Commentary. Dr. Kenneth O. Gangel.

1. Luke wrote for an individual (Theophilus). Matthew and Mark targeted Jewish audiences with their record of Jesus’ life and work. John wrote for the world, living as he did at the end of 50 years of church history, knowing that the gospel had already permeated the entire Mediterranean world. Indeed, he stated his purpose clearly: “Jesus did many other miraculous sings in the presence of his disciples, which are not recorded in this book. But, these are written that you may believe that Jesus is the Christ, the Son of God, and that by believing you may have life in his name” (John 20:30-31).

2. The Gospel of John radiates faith. I like to say that John offers the motto, “Believing is seeing.” John focused on Jesus’ teaching, avoiding most of the miracles and all of the parables. Writing with a clear grasp of Jewish culture, his logic appealed to Greek readers as well, as he set forth an evangelistic theology. John carefully selected his material and unashamedly targeted unbelievers.

3. John’s favorite word for new birth in Christ is “life.”

4. John wrote this Gospel so that the Holy Spirit could produce faith in the hearts of those who could not have an earthly eyewitness experience like his own.

C. Scofield Reference Notes. Dr. C.I. Scofield.

THEME: This is indicated both in the Prologue (John 1:1-14), and in the last verse of the Gospel proper (John 20:31), and is: (1) The incarnation of the eternal Word, and Son of life; (2) that as many as believe on Him as “the Christ, the Son of God” (John 20:31) may have eternal life. The prominent words are, “believed” and “life.”

IV. Credential information can be found on my website Page, “About Theologians.”

V. Video Details.

A. Gaither Vocal Band – I Know Who Holds Tomorrow (Official Video).

B. Gaither Music TV. Dec 13, 2012.

VI. Please follow this site.