Hanukkah 2018

Jews around the world began celebrating Hanukkah on the evening of Sunday, December 2, 2018. Consider the warmth and love that is present in a Jewish family celebrating Hanukkah.

Chanukah Candle Blessings • First Night

Consider the uplifting discussion on Hanukkah.

Hanukkah || Mayim Bialik

Consider the discussion on lighting Hanukkah Candles. Notice the difference between the Shamash candle, in relation to the eight Hanukkah candles.

How to Light Chanukah Candles

The following kids video provides a good explanation on Hanukkah. The subject of Hanukkah is one that is all too often neglected in Christian churches. But, as the following information will attest, there is a great deal of information that relates to Hanukkah that also relates to Christ, our Lord and Savior.

The Story of Hanukkah

The Jewish observance of Hanukkah began on sunset of Sunday, December 2, 2018 and will end on the nightfall of Monday, December 10, 2018. Hanukkah commemorates the rededication of the Temple in Jerusalem after a group of Jewish warriors defeated the occupying mighty Greek armies. Consider the following links.
https://www.chabad.org/holidays/default_cdo/jewish/holidays.htm
https://www.chabad.org/holidays/chanukah/article_cdo/aid/102911/jewish/What-Is-Hanukkah.htm

Consider the significance of the “shamash, or servant candle.” As is shown in the video, the servant candle “gives light” to the other candles “one by one.” Consider also, the significance of the servant candle to the following verse of scripture:

John 1:9 New American Standard Bible (NASB)

9 There was the true Light which, coming into the world, enlightens every man.

Christ is the light which brings spiritual light to a world of spiritual darkness. He gives light to all coming into the world, “one by one.” The shamash candle is prophetic of Christ, our Lord and Savior. In my home a hanukkiyah (hon ooo kee ah) has a permanent place in the living room. Notice that the shamash candle stands above all of the other candles, which shows the deity of Christ. In the kids video the example of the oil that was supposed to last for only one day, continued to burn for eight days. As in Christ, the oil of the Holy Spirit burns in the lives of believers in Christ, “forever .”

The Holy Spirit Described As Oil

Isaiah 61:1-4 New American Standard Bible (NASB)

Exaltation of the Afflicted

1 The Spirit of the Lord God is upon me,
Because the Lord has anointed me
To bring good news to the afflicted;
He has sent me to bind up the brokenhearted,
To proclaim liberty to captives
And freedom to prisoners;
2 To proclaim the favorable year of the Lord
And the day of vengeance of our God;
To comfort all who mourn,
3 To grant those who mourn in Zion,
Giving them a garland instead of ashes,
The oil of gladness instead of mourning,
The mantle of praise instead of a spirit of fainting.
So they will be called oaks of righteousness,
The planting of the Lord, that He may be glorified.

Acts 10:38 New American Standard Bible (NASB)

38 You know of Jesus of Nazareth, how God anointed Him with the Holy Spirit and with power, and how He went about doing good and healing all who were oppressed by the devil, for God was with Him.

Consider the truth of the Messiah/Christ/Yeshua in the following song.

Chanukah – Marty Goetz

There is no Old Testament discussion on the celebration of Hanukkah. However, in the New Testament, there is an account of the Feast of Dedication, which is also known as the Feast Of Hanukkah and the Feast Of Lights. The passage shows that Christ was present for Hanukkah. Below the following verse, there is a comment on Hanukkah that is provided by Dr. John MacArthur.

John 10:22-23 New American Standard Bible (NASB)

22 At that time the Feast of the Dedication took place at Jerusalem; 23 it was winter, and Jesus was walking in the temple in the portico of Solomon.

10:22 Feast of Dedication. The Jewish celebration of Hanukkah, which celebrates the Israelite victory over the Syrian leader Antiochus Epiphanes, who persecuted Israel. In ca. 170 B.C. he conquered Jerusalem and desecrated the Jewish temple by setting up a pagan altar to displace the altar of God. Under the leadership of an old priest named Mattathias (his family name was called the Hasmoneans), the Jews fought guerrilla warfare (known as the Maccabean Revolt—166–142 B.C.) against Syria and freed the temple and the land from Syrian dominance until 63 B.C. when Rome (Pompey) took control of Palestine. It was in 164 B.C. on 25 Chislev (Dec. approximately), that the Jews liberated the temple and rededicated it. The celebration is also known as the “Feast of Lights” because of the lighting of lamps and candles in Jewish homes to commemorate the event. it was winter. John indicated by this phrase that the cold weather drove Jesus to walk on the eastern side of the temple in the sheltered area of Solomon’s porch, which after the resurrection became the regular gathering place of Christians where they would proclaim the gospel (see Acts 3:11; 5:12).

Consider Christ, “the Light of the world.”

John 1:1-13 New American Standard Bible (NASB) The Deity of Jesus Christ
1 In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God, and the Word was God. 2 He was in the beginning with God. 3 All things came into being through Him, and apart from Him nothing came into being that has come into being. 4 In Him was life, and the life was the Light of men. 5 The Light shines in the darkness, and the darkness did not comprehend it.

The Witness John

6 There came a man sent from God, whose name was John. 7 He came as a witness, to testify about the Light, so that all might believe through him. 8 He was not the Light, but he came to testify about the Light.

9 There was the true Light which, coming into the world, enlightens every man. 10 He was in the world, and the world was made through Him, and the world did not know Him. 11 He came to His own, and those who were His own did not receive Him. 12 But as many as received Him, to them He gave the right to become children of God, even to those who believe in His name, 13 who were born, not of blood nor of the will of the flesh nor of the will of man, but of God.

John 8:12 New American Standard Bible (NASB) Jesus Is the Light of the World

12 Then Jesus again spoke to them, saying, “I am the Light of the world; he who follows Me will not walk in the darkness, but will have the Light of life.”

Those of us, of whom know Christ as our Lord and Savior, will be caught up to be with Christ, the Eternal Light, and spend eternity with Him. Consider the verses; consider the song by Sandi Patty.

1 Thessalonians 4:16-17 New American Standard Bible (NASB)

16 For the Lord Himself will descend from heaven with a shout, with the voice of the archangel and with the trumpet of God, and the dead in Christ will rise first. 17 Then we who are alive and remain will be caught up together with them in the clouds to meet the Lord in the air, and so we shall always be with the Lord.

Sandi Patty – We Shall Behold Him [Live]

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Hanukkah

Chanukah Candle Blessings • First Night

Consider the warmth and love that is present as a Jewish family celebrates the first night of Hanukkah.

There is no Old Testament discussion of the celebration of Hanukkah. However, in the New Testament, there is an account of the Feast of Dedication, which is also known as the Feast Of Hanukkah and the Feast Of Lights. Below the following verse, there is a comment on Hanukkah that is provided by Dr. John MacArthur.

John 10:22 New American Standard Bible (NASB)

22 At that time the Feast of the Dedication took place at Jerusalem;

10:22 Feast of Dedication. The Jewish celebration of Hanukkah, which celebrates the Israelite victory over the Syrian leader Antiochus Epiphanes, who persecuted Israel. In ca. 170 B.C. he conquered Jerusalem and desecrated the Jewish temple by setting up a pagan altar to displace the altar of God. Under the leadership of an old priest named Mattathias (his family name was called the Hasmoneans), the Jews fought guerrilla warfare (known as the Maccabean Revolt—166–142 B.C.) against Syria and freed the temple and the land from Syrian dominance until 63 B.C. when Rome (Pompey) took control of Palestine. It was in 164 B.C. on 25 Chislev (Dec. approximately), that the Jews liberated the temple and rededicated it. The celebration is also known as the “Feast of Lights” because of the lighting of lamps and candles in Jewish homes to commemorate the event. it was winter. John indicated by this phrase that the cold weather drove Jesus to walk on the eastern side of the temple in the sheltered area of Solomon’s porch, which after the resurrection became the regular gathering place of Christians where they would proclaim the gospel (see Acts 3:11; 5:12).

It should be known that the Jewish King Solomon completed the construction of the temple in Jerusalem, Israel, in the year 959 B.C. Such documentation is provided in the Old Testament books of 1 Kings, Chapter 7, and 2 Chronicles, Chapter 5.

So, if you have a Jewish friend, what is the proper greeting for Hanukkah?

https://toriavey.com/hanukkah-the-festival-of-lights/

To wish someone a Happy Hanukkah, say “Hanukkah Sameach!” (Happy Hanukkah) or simply “Chag Sameach!” (Happy Holiday). Or if you want to show off your Hebrew skills, say “Chag Urim Sameach!” (urim means “lights”).

See the full post:https://toriavey.com/hanukkah-the-festival-of-lights/#ee86b1UT3qoDtzUx.99

Consider the following articles and links that relate to Hanukkah.

https://www.myjewishlearning.com/article/hanukkah-how-to-celebrate-the-festival-of-lights/?utm_source=mjl_maropost&utm_campaign=MJL&utm_medium=email&mpweb=1161-2065-16199
Hanukkah Starts Tonight! Here’s How to Celebrate

https://reformjudaism.org/jewish-holidays/hanukkah
Hanukkah

Hanukkah is celebrated in 2017, from sunset on December 12, through sunset of December 20. Hanukkah (alternately spelled Chanukah), meaning “dedication” in Hebrew, refers to the joyous eight-day celebration during which Jews commemorate the victory of the Maccabees over the armies of Syria in 165 B.C.E. and the subsequent liberation and “rededication” of the Temple in Jerusalem. The modern home celebration of Hanukkah centers around the lighting of the hanukkiyah, a special menorah for Hanukkah; foods prepared in oil including latkes (potato pancakes) and sufganiyot (jelly doughnuts); and special songs and games.

https://reformjudaism.org/hanukkah-history
Home / Jewish Holidays / Hanukkah

History: The Hanukkah Story

The story of Hanukkah (Chanukah) also known as the Festival of Lights. Unlike many Jewish holidays, Hanukkah (also known as the Festival of Lights) is not mentioned in the Bible. The historical events upon which the celebration is based are recorded in Maccabees I and II, two books contained within a later collection of writings known as the Apocrypha. Although Hanukkah is considered a “minor” Jewish festival, today it ranks—along with Passover and Purim—as one of the most beloved Jewish family holidays.

In the year 168 B.C.E., the Syrian tyrant Antiochus Epiphanes sent his soldiers to Jerusalem. The Syrians desecrated the Temple, the holiest place for Jews at that time. Antiochus also abolished Judaism, outlawing the observance of Shabbat and the Festivals, as well as circumcision. Altars and idols were set up for the worship of Greek gods and he offered Jews two options: conversion or death.

On the 25th day of the Hebrew month of Kislev in 168 B.C.E., the Temple was renamed for the Greek god Zeus. A resistance movement— led by a priestly family known as the Hasmoneans, or Maccabees—developed against the cruelty of Antiochus. The head of the family was Mattathias, an elderly man. His son, Judah, became the chief strategist and military leader of the resistance. Though outnumbered, Judah Maccabee and his fighters miraculously won two major battles, routing the Syrians decisively.

Although historians debate the causes and outcomes of the war in which Judah Maccabee and his followers defeated the Syrian armies of Antiochus, there is no doubt that Hanukkah evokes stirring images of Jewish valor against overwhelming odds. Other themes rooted in the observance of the holiday include the refusal to submit to the religious demands of an empire practicing idolatry, the struggle against total assimilation into Hellenistic culture and loss of Jewish identity, and the fight for Jewish political autonomy and self-determination.

Hanukkah, which means “dedication,” is the festival that commemorates the purification and rededication of the Temple following the defilement caused by the Greeks during their occupation of that holy place. Today, the holiday reminds Jews to rededicate themselves to stand against forces that would destroy Judaism and to keep alive the flame of Jewish religion, culture, and peoplehood so that it may be passed on to the next generation.

Originally, the eight-day holiday was intended to parallel the eight-day festival of Sukkot. The Books of the Maccabees made no mention of the legend concerning a small jar of oil that unexpectedly lasted for eight days. Only centuries after the Maccabees’ defeat of the Syrians did the story of the jar of oil—which has come to be a part of Hanukkah—appear in the Talmud.

According to the legend, when the Maccabees entered the Temple and began to reclaim it from the Greeks, they immediately relit the ner tamid (eternal light), which burned constantly in the Temple and has a parallel in our synagogues to this day. In the Temple, they found a single jar of oil, which was sufficient for only one day. The messenger who was sent to secure additional oil took eight days to complete his mission, and miraculously, the single jar of oil continued to burn until his return. The rabbis of the Talmud attributed the eight days of Hanukkah to the miracle of this single jar of oil.

Although the practice of lighting the menorah was common throughout much of the 19th century, North American Jews tended to neglect most of the other traditions and practices associated with the holiday. By the 1920s, however, Jews increasingly added gift-giving to their Hanukkah celebrations, prompting Christians to refer to Hanukkah as the “Jewish Christmas.”

Like many aspects of Jewish religious practice, the transformation of Hanukkah was linked to the growth of North American Jewry within its unique environment. The elevation of Hanukkah to a major holiday was the result of Jews acculturating themselves to a North America that was overwhelmingly Christian in population and symbols.

Although Hanukkah had become an important holiday among North American Jews by the 1920s, it would be incorrect to regard it as an imitation of Christmas with an emphasis on the exchange of presents. Rather, North American Jews use this holiday as a celebration of family, reinforcing Jewish identity in a place whose population may be overwhelmingly Christian but in which Jews feel at home. Hanukkah, therefore, is a means for North American Jews to feel a kinship with their neighbors, while simultaneously asserting their Jewish distinctiveness.

After having provided all of the above information on Hanukkah, I wish all of my Jewish Friends, “Happy Hanukkah.” May you offer the same greeting to a Jewish person that you may know.

The Story Of Chanukah – The Attack On God’s Chosen People Continues Today

Hanukkah – In Those Days, at This Time.

Click onto any blue letter or number to see the video and text on the blog.

Genesis 1:1 Names of God Bible (NOG) (Notice that Jehovah “is not” the Name of God)

The Creation

1 In the beginning Elohim created heaven and earth.

Genesis 12:1-3 Names of God Bible (NOG)

The Lord’s First Promise to Abram

1 Yahweh said to Abram, “Leave your land, your relatives, and your father’s home. Go to the land that I will show you.
2 I will make you a great nation, I will bless you. I will make your name great, and you will be a blessing.
3 I will bless those who bless you, and whoever curses you, I will curse. Through you every family on earth will be blessed.”

Deuteronomy 7:6 Names of God Bible (NOG)

6 You are a holy people, who belong to Yahweh your Elohim. Yahweh your Elohim chose you to be his own special possession out of all the nations on earth.

Ezekiel 36:24-28 Names of God Bible (NOG)

24 “‘I will take you from the nations and gather you from every country. I will bring you back to your own land. 25 I will sprinkle clean water on you and make you clean instead of unclean. Then I will cleanse you from all your idols. 26 I will give you a new heart and put a new spirit in you. I will remove your stubborn hearts and give you obedient hearts. 27 I will put my Ruach in you. I will enable you to live by my laws, and you will obey my rules. 28 Then you will live in the land that I gave your ancestors. You will be my people, and I will be your Elohim.

Consider why the Jews are God’s chosen people. Stepping out from the Ark, the three sons of Noah were the only males, other than Noah, who would step onto planet Earth. They were to be the fathers of all who would ever be born on the earth that had been destroyed by the flood. Noah’s sons were told by God to repopulate the earth (Genesis 9:1). Shem, Ham and Japheth were the names of the sons of Noah (Genesis 10:1). Christ, the Messiah, could only be born of one woman, with that woman being Mary, who was of the blood line of Shem (Luke 3:36). The Jewish blood line came from Shem, so God chose the Jews to bring the Messiah into the world, with the Messiah being called Immanuel (God with us, Isaiah 7:14; Matthew 1:23), and Yeshua (Matthew 1:25). Again, Christ, who was also called Yeshua could have been born of only one mother, with that mother being Mary (Luke 1:26-33). Mary was of the bloodline of the Jews (Luke 3:33). Judah, the son of Jacob/Israel (Luke 3:34), is the starting point of the bloodline of Shem that began to be known as “Jew,” in respect to the blood line that led to the birth of the Messiah, who was called Immanuel and Christ and Yesuha.

Romans 11:29 New King James Version (NKJV) “For the gifts and the calling of God are irrevocable.”

(This verse is important as it relates to the promises that God gave to Israel. It is also important in regard to the gifts that God gave to those whom have been born again (John 3:3, John 3:8, John 3:16, John 3:18, Romans 8:1).

UN passes anti-settlement resolution, US abstains (The link which follows the next three lines will show the story)

“The Obama administration not only failed to protect Israel against this gang-up at the UN, it colluded with it behind the scenes. Israel looks forward to working with President-elect Trump and with all our friends in Congress, Republicans and Democrats alike, to negate the harmful effects of this absurd resolution.

http://us5.campaign-archive2.com/?u=ba13d322ff1efbe114aeb6779&id=d837e026ae&e=c7d996ef75

Consider The Story Of Hanukkah

Chanukah begins Sat. night, Dec. 24, 2016 and continues through Sunday, Jan. 1, 2017 (Hanukkah/Chanukah)

How to Light the Hanukkah Menorah (Hanukiah)

Consider the Shamash candle which gives light to the other candles, and consider Christ who is the light of the world (John 8:12). Consider also that the Shamash candle is the servant candle to give light to all of the other candles, and that Christ is a servant to give spiritual light to all of the world, to turn it away from the darkness of sin (Acts 3:26).

What Is the Symbolism Behind the Menorah?

The Menorah (7 Candles). The Hanukkah Menorah (Hanukiah) (9 Candles)

Exodus 25:31-39 Names of God Bible (NOG)

The Lamp Stand

31 “Make a lamp stand out of pure gold. The lamp stand, its base, and its shaft, as well as the flower cups, buds, and petals must be hammered out of one piece of gold. 32 Six branches are to come out of the sides, three branches on one side and three on the other. 33 Each of the six branches coming out of the lamp stand is to have three flower cups shaped like almond blossoms, with buds and petals. 34 The lamp stand itself is to have four flower cups shaped like almond blossoms, with buds and petals. 35 There should be a bud under each of the three pairs of branches coming out of the lamp stand. 36 The buds and branches should also be hammered out of the same piece of pure gold as the lamp stand.
37 “Make seven lamps, and set them on the lamp stand so that they light up the area in front of it. 38 The tongs and incense burners must be made of pure gold. 39 Use 75 pounds of pure gold to make the lamp stand and all the utensils.

Exodus 27:21 Names of God Bible (NOG)

21 In the tent of meeting outside the canopy where the words of my promise are, Aaron and his descendants must keep the lamps lit in Yahweh’s presence from evening until morning. This is a permanent law among the Israelites for generations to come.”

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