Matthew Chapter 16

I. Video.

A. Title. Matthew Chapter 16. The Demand for a Sign – The Yeast of the Pharisees and Sadduccees – Peter’s Confession of Christ – Jesus Predicts His DeathShow less.

B. Data. LuisetReneeandBill.

II. Overview. Dr. John F. Walvoord, Th. D. (DTS). Chapter 16, Teaching In Anticipation of Rejection.

A. Pharisees and Sadducees Seek a Sign, 16:1-4.

1. The Pharisees, who had questioned the disciples’ disregard of their traditions, now joined by the Sadducees, sought to trap Jesus into giving them a sign from heaven. This was the first time the Pharisees and Sadducees, usually in disagreement, joined hands to trap Jesus. Earlier (Mt 12:38), they had asked for a sign and were given the sign of the prophet Jonah, with its prediction of the death and resurrection of Christ. Their asking for a sign indicated that they were unimpressed by the miracles and teaching of Christ, the very credentials predicted in the Old Testament.

2. Jesus, in His reply, alluded to their spiritual stupidity. He pointed out that when it came to seeing signs relating to weather, they could understand; but when it came to the signs of the times, they were unable to relate intelligently to them.

3. In closing His comments, Christ said that a wicked and adulterous generation will not be given a sign, except the sign He had given them earlier, when they had asked the same question, the sign of the prophet Jonah. Although the Pharisees were not accused of being adulterers, spiritually, they were in the same state as those who had no morality and no religion. If He had given them some miraculous sign from heaven, they would have returned to the same accusation recorded in Matthew 12:24, that it was a miracle accomplished only by the power of Satan. Faith is not given to those who are seeking support for unbelief.

B. Leaven of the Pharisees and Sadducees, 16:5-12.

1. According to Mark 8-10, the Pharisees had questioned Him while in Dalmanutha, located on the west shore of Galilee. Upon conclusion of His exchange with the Pharisees, Jesus and His disciples again proceeded by boat to the eastern shore. When they arrived, the disciples found that they had forgotten to take bread (Mt 16:5). This would not have been so serious near Capernaum, but the eastern shore was relatively unpopulated.

2. Using this as an occasion for driving home a spiritual point, Jesus warned them against the leaven of the Pharisees and Sadducees. The disciples thought He was referring to the fact that they had taken no bread. Jesus rebuked them for their concern, reminding them of the feeding of the five thousand and the feeding of the four thousand. He went on to state that He was warning them of the leaven of the Pharisees and the Sadducees. Leaven here, as elsewhere in the Scripture, is a symbol of permeating evil. They were not to be influenced by the infection of unbelief derived from these religious leaders.

C. Prediction of the Church, 16:13-20.

1. Proceeding north and east from the Sea of Galilee, Christ came to the borders of Caesarea Philippi. There He questioned His disciples about their faith in Him, as also recorded in Mark 8:27-30 and Luke 9:18-21. He drew out of them first what others had said about Him. The response had been varied. Some people had considered Him John the Baptist raised from the dead, others Elijah the prophet, others Jeremiah or one of the other prophets. Only Matthew mentions Jeremiah.

2. Having prepared the way, Jesus then asked the important question, “But whom say ye that I am?” In reply, Simon Peter, frequently the spokesman for the twelve, declared, “Thou art the Christ, the Son of the living God” (Mt 16:16). Only Matthew adds the expression, “of the living God.”

3. Pronouncing a blessing on Peter as the one who had received this revelation from God the Father, Jesus made the important announcement about the church, which was not recorded in the narratives of the other gospels. He said, “And I say also unto thee, That thou art Peter, and upon this rock I will build my church; and the gates of hell shall not prevail against it.”

4. Peter (Petros) means a loose stone. The “rock” is petra, a large or massive rock, like a cliff. The passage has often been cited to indicate the primacy of Peter as the first pope and the justification for the whole system built upon this concept. It is clear from other Scripture, however, that the rock upon which Christ intended to build is Himself, the solid rock, not Peter, one stone in the church composed of many living stones (1 Pe 2:5). What Jesus said, then, was, “Thou art a little rock, and upon this massive rock [pointing to Himself] I will build my church.”

5. It was not Peter upon which the church would be built but upon the person to whom Peter had witnessed in his confession of faith, Christ, the Son of the living God.

6. The church does not rest on a quality found in Peter and in others like him. The church is not built on the confession her members make, which would change the effect into the cause. By her confession the church shows on what she is built. She rests on the reality which Peter confessed, namely, “the Christ, the Son of the living God.”

7. Some Protestants, however, continue to interpret this as referring to Peter, not as a pope, but as a believer of the first generation, a stone upon which others can build. In any case, the evidence in support of Peter as a bishop of Rome is lacking.

8. The dynamic words, “I will build my church,” significantly are found in the gospel of Matthew, which more than the other gospels is given to the explanation of why the promised kingdom of the Old Testament was not brought in at the first coming of Christ. Here Matthew is introducing very simply the concept which is developed in the upper room discourse, John 13-17, and in the Acts and epistles, that God has a present purpose to be fulfilled in calling out His church, before the ultimate kingdom purpose is fulfilled.

9. The fact that Christ stated it as a future purpose indicates that His present ministry was not building the church, and, accordingly, even the mystery form of the kingdom was not precisely the same as the church.

10. As H. A. Ironside expresses it, “The building of this spiritual temple did not begin until after He had ascended to heaven, and the Spirit of God came as the promised Comforter.”

11. The word build is also significant because it implies the gradual erection of the church under the symbolism of living stones being built upon Christ, the foundation stone, as indicated in 1 Peter 2:4-8. This was to be the purpose of God before the second coming, in contrast to the millennial kingdom, which would follow the second coming. Against this program of God, the gates of hell (hades) will not be able to hold out. Amillenarians tend to ignore this momentous declaration.

12. After this great pronouncement, Christ added, “I will give unto thee the keys of the kingdom of heaven: and whatsoever thou shalt bind on earth shall be bound in heaven: and whatsoever thou shalt loose on earth shall be loosed in heaven” (Mt 16:19). In this declaration, Christ was making clear the authority and important place of Peter as having the message which unlocks the entrance into the kingdom of heaven.

13. This, however, is no justification for attributing to Peter authority which was not shared with the other disciples. Although the singular is used here in the word thee, in 18:18, a similar pronouncement is made using ye, applying to all the disciples. In a sense, every believer who has the gospel has the right to declare that those who believe the gospel are loosed on earth as well as in heaven, and to declare that those who reject the gospel are bound in earth as well as in heaven.

14. Jesus concluded His discourse on this important theme by charging His disciples not to tell anyone that He was Jesus the Christ. This strange command for silence is probably best understood as meaning that it was not propitious at this point to spread further the claim that He was indeed the Messiah. The time would come when they would proclaim it fearlessly, even though it would lead most of them ultimately to a martyr’s death.

D. Jesus Again Foretells His Death and Resurrection, 16:21-23.

1. In anticipation of His ultimate rejection, Jesus repeated here earlier warnings concerning His death and coming resurrection. Mark 8:31-33 and Luke 9:22 refer to the same incident. Peter, having risen to great heights of faith in the preceding context, then demonstrated his lack of understanding by rebuking Jesus. In contrast to Christ’s commendation of Peter, in Matthew 16:17-18, Jesus here rebuked Peter, “Get thee behind me, Satan: thou art an offence unto me: for thou savourest not the things that be of God, but those that be of men.” The problem here was lack of spiritual discernment so common to man but not in keeping with Peter’s place of leadership among the disciples. Like many modern readers of the Bible, Peter did not want to accept what did not agree with his hopes and ambitions. The disciples who had been led to faith in the person of Christ were not yet prepared to accept His work on the cross.

2. Earlier, Jesus had spoken of this in veiled language, as when He predicted that if the Jews destroyed the temple, He would raise it again in three days (Jn 2:18-22). This had occurred two years before. To Nicodemus, who came with his questions, in John 3, Jesus had said that He had to be lifted up, even as the serpent in the wilderness, in order to save those who believed in Him (vv. 14-18). In His interchange with the Pharisees, in Matthew 12:38-41, He had indicated that He would spend three days and nights in the heart of the earth. The same thought had been repeated in Matthew 16:4. Now, however, the time had come to speak plainly. Their faith in Him would have to be more than confidence that He was the Messiah of Israel. They would also have to believe that He was the Lamb of God, who had come to take away this sin of the world.

E. Cost and Reward of Discipleship, 16:24-28.

1. After introducing the fact of His death, Jesus proceeded to teach His disciples the basic principles of discipleship. Parallel accounts are found in Mark 8:34-38 and Luke 9:23-26. He had taught them earlier on the same subject (Mt 10:21-42). Discipleship would not immediately fulfill glorious expectations of reigning with Christ in His kingdom or being in places of power and influence. The road to glory is a road of suffering, He taught them. It is only by losing one’s life that one is able to save it. The principles of spiritual triumph differ from the principles of worldly triumph. Negatively, one must deny himself; positively, he must take up his cross and follow Jesus.

2. As the road to triumph differs for a disciple, so also does the reward. For the world, there is immediate gain but ultimate loss: for the disciple, there is immediate loss but ultimate gain. As Jesus pointed out, ultimately the man who loses his own soul in the process of gaining the whole world is exchanging his future glory for a temporary reward.

3. Reaching forward prophetically to the time of His second coming, Jesus declared, “Then he shall reward every man according to his works” (16:27). This applies both to the lost soul and to the one who is saved. Having prophetically reached out to the consummation, He then made the present application in the closing verse of chapter 16, “There be some standing here, which shall not taste of death, till they see the Son of man coming in his kingdom.” Jesus was not saying, as some have construed it, that the second coming would occur before those of His generation tasted death. He was introducing, rather, the transfiguration of chapter 17, which anticipated, in vision, the glory of the Son of man coming in His kingdom.

III. Scripture Text Examination. Dr. Charles C. Ryrie, Th. D., Ph. D. (DTS), Chapter 16.

A. 16:4. “adulterous generation…sign of Jonah.” The nation was unfaithful in its vows to the Lord. “the sign of Jonah the prophet.” In Luke 11:29-32 the sign is the warning of judgment to come (Jonah 1:2; 3:4). Here the sign is related to the death and resurrection of the Son of Man. Re Matt 12:40. “THREE DAYS AND THREE NIGHTS.” This phrase does not necessarily require that 72 hours elapse between Christ’s death and resurrection, for the Jews reckoned part of a day to be a whole day. This, prophecy can be properly fulfilled if the death of Jesus occurred on Friday. However, the statement does require an historical Jonah, who was actually swallowed by a great fish. The explanation of the three days and nights finds agreement in the Moody Bible Commentary, MacArthur Study Bible, Holman Christian Study Bible, NKJV Study Bible.

B. 16:14. “John…Elijah…Jeremiah.” Some must have have seen resemblances between Christ’s teachings and those of these great prophets.

C. 16:17. “Blessed are you,” because he had received this insight through divine revelation and not through human influences.

D. 16:24-28. This passage is on discipleship. Verses 13-20 are on messiahship; verses 21-23 are on the Atonement; 17:1-8 concerns eschatology . These four passages together deal with the truth of NT theology.

E. 16:28. “see the Son of Man coming in His kingdom.” This was fulfilled when the disciples witnessed the Transformation (17:1-8), which was, in miniature, a preview of the kingdom, with the Lord appearing in a state of glory (Dan 7:9-14).

IV. Summing it up. It is clear from the Scripture context, and the commentary of Drs. Ryrie and MacArthur, and the referenced study bibles, that the sixteenth chapter of Matthew, as well as all prior chapters, relate to the offer of Jesus of the Davidic Kingdom, that was made to the Jews of Israel, and only to Jews. The term “Son of Man” was known to Jews, as a reference to Messiah (Dan 7:13-14), and not to Gentiles. Additionally,  the synoptic gospels, of Mathew, Mark, and Luke, do not relate to personal salvation, but to the nation of Israel through its restoration (Luke 13:1-5 {context}; Acts 1:6). Only the Gospel of John (John 3:16) tells of the offer of individual salvation. Compare Luke 13:5 to John 3:16, and you will see a great difference through the context of salvation; Lk 13:5, to the nation of Israel, and John3:16 to individual Jews and Gentiles. Through the ministry of Jesus, during His first advent, He is giving the Jews a glimpse of the coming kingdom (Isa 61:2, “to comfort all who mourn.”), which will take place on earth after His second Advent. Gentiles would have had no in depth knowledge, if any, of Old Testament prophets.

V. For education and other supporting data for each source of information in this article, please refer to my Page, “About My References.”

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Matthew Chapter 15

I. Video.

A. Title. Clean and Unclean – The Faith of the Canaanite Woman – Jesus Feeds the Four Thousand.

B. Data. LuisetReneeandBill

II. Overview. Dr. John F. Walvoord, Th. D. (DTS). Chapter 15: The Rejected King’s Continued Ministry of Mercy.


A. Controversy with the Scribes and Pharisees 15:1-9

1. Chapter 15 runs parallel to Mark 7:1-8:9, with some variation in the details and order of the discourse. It is clear that both Matthew and Mark are summaries of incidents that were actually much longer and more detailed.

2. The Pharisees and scribes were incensed at the disciples because they did not follow the tradition of washing of hands when they ate bread. They drew the implication that this disregard of tradition was taught by Jesus as a matter of principle rather than as a single act of transgression of ceremonial law. Mark gives a longer explanation, that what was involved was not simply the washing of hands but the washing of cups, pots, brass vessels, and tables (Mk 7:4). The traditions referred to were the haggada and the halacha which were teachings derived only in part from Scripture. The Pharisees paid more attention to these ceremonial washings than they did to the Scriptures themselves.

3. Jesus answered their question by another question, “Why do ye also transgress the commandment of God by your tradition?” (Mt 15:3). He then cited the fifth commandment (Ex 20:12) and Leviticus 20:9, which imposed the death penalty on one who cursed his father or his mother. He pointed out that they controverted the Scriptures in their honor of father and mother by their allowance that a child could declare something a gift or dedicated to God, and, by this means, free himself of the obligation to care for his parents. Jesus summarized this, “Thus have ye made the commandment of God of none effect by your tradition” (Mt 15:16). Jesus did not accuse the Pharisees of cursing their fathers and mothers, but He did point out that the deep-seated principle of honoring the father and mother is violated by their tradition.

4. After having denounced their doctrine, Jesus then turned to their own spiritual need. Addressing them as hypocrites, He quoted from Isaiah 29:13 that Israel would draw nigh to God with their lips but not their hearts. Such worship, Christ said, is empty because it teaches the commandments of man in place of the doctrines of God. The real need of the Pharisees was a changed heart, not more religious traditions.

B. Teaching on the Wicked Heart of Man, 15:10-20. 

1. After having used the objection of the Pharisees as an occasion for exposing the spiritual need of man, He pointed out that the spiritual law is the opposite of the natural law, namely, that not what goes into the mouth defiles a man as the Pharisees held; rather it was that which came out of the mouth that defiled him. Matthew records that the disciples warned Jesus that He had offended the Pharisees. In answering this, Jesus pointed out that the Pharisees were blind leaders of the blind and, eventually, because of their blindness, would fall into the ditch. They were plants not planted by God the Father and would ultimately be rooted up. In the parallel account in Mark 7, these comments are omitted. 

2. When Jesus went into the house to get away from the people, as explained in Mark 7:17, the disciples and Peter in particular (Mt 15:15) wanted Him to explain what He had said. Jesus had said, in effect, that food did not cause spiritual problems for men; it was rather what had come out of one’s heart in the form of words and actions. Jesus itemized such things as “evil thoughts, murders, adulteries, fornications, thefts, false witness, blasphemies” (v. 19).

3. These things do not necessarily proceed from the mouth but do proceed from the heart. And these things, Jesus said, are the real problem and the real defilement of a man, not when he eats with hands which have not been ceremoniously washed. The occupation with the outward religious ceremony, instead of inner transformation of the heart, has all too often attended all forms of religion and has plagued the church as well as it has Judaism. How many Christians, in the history of the church, have been executed for difference of opinion on the meaning of the elements of the Lord’s Supper or the mode of baptism or for failure to bow to church authority? The heart of man, which is so incurably religious, is also incurably evil, apart from the grace of God.

C. Withdrawal to Tyre and Sidon, 15:21-28.

1. Having previously attempted to withdraw into the desert (Mt 14:13), Jesus again departed from the multitudes which thronged Him, going probably the longest distance away from Jerusalem. Proceeding to the far northwest of the coast, where Tyre and Sidon were located, He encountered a woman of Canaan who pleaded with Him to heal her daughter who was demon possessed. In the parallel account in Mark 7:24-30, the woman is declared to be a Greek, a Syrophenician, meaning that she was a Gentile, using the more contemporary name for her nationality.

2. Although she addressed Jesus as “Son of David,” He did not answer her. Her repeated cries irritated the disciples, who suggested that Jesus send her away. In an explanation of why He had not replied, Jesus told the disciples, “I am not sent but unto the lost sheep of the house of Israel” (Mt 15:24). The woman, however, was not to be easily discouraged, and bowing and worshiping before Him, she said simply, “Lord, help me” (v. 25).

3. Jesus, attempting to explain to the woman His commission to preach to the house of Israel, said, “It is not meet to take the children’s bread and to cast it to dogs” (v. 26). The woman, in reply, pleaded that even dogs were allowed to eat crumbs which fell from the table. In response to this faith, Jesus said, “O woman, great is thy faith: be it unto thee even as thou wilt” (v. 28). Matthew comments that her daughter was healed immediately, implying that they had a later report as to what the outcome of it was.

4. According to Mark, Jesus also told the woman, “The devil is gone out of thy daughter” (Mk 7:29). Mark also goes on to say that when the woman returned home, she found her daughter laid upon a bed and that the demon had departed (v. 30).

D. Return To Galilee, 15:19-31.

Upon His return to Galilee from His short visit to the coast, the multitudes again found Jesus in the mountains. In His customary role as a Teacher, He sat down, healing the lame, the blind, the dumb, the maimed, and many others, with the people glorifying the God of Israel because of this unusual visitation. Mark 7:31-37 singles out one outstanding case of a man deaf with an impediment in speech whom Jesus healed.

E. Feeding of the Four Thousand, 15:32-39.

1. The period of miracles following His return to Galilee apparently extended over three days, or at least parts of three days, and lack of food might cause people to faint on their way home.

2. This incident should be contrasted to the feeding of the five thousand. As Edwin W. Rice has pointed out, “Here the crowds are chiefly of Gentile or semi-Gentile origin; the five thousand were mainly Galilean Jews. Here four thousand are fed; before five thousand. Here they sat on the ground, for the summer sun had burned up the grass; before, they were on grass as it was early spring.”

3. As in the feeding of the five thousand, the earlier incident, Jesus asked what the disciples had available. This time, He found that they had seven small loaves and a few fishes, about enough for one person, in contrast to five loaves and two fishes in the earlier incident. This time the disciples apparently anticipated a miracle. Again, following the preceding order of the feeding of the five thousand, the multitude was asked to sit down. Jesus gave thanks for the food and, breaking it, gave to the disciples to distribute. This time there were seven large baskets of food left over, in contrast to twelve small baskets in the feeding of the five thousand. The place was Decapolis, the opposite side of the lake from the feeding of the five thousand. Sending the multitude away with full hearts and full stomachs, Jesus went by boat to Magdala, or Magadan, an area just north of Tiberias on the west shore of the Sea of Galilee.

III. Scripture Text Examination. Dr. Charles C. Ryrie, Th. D., Ph. D. (DTS), Chapter 15.

A. 15:2. Only traditional interpretational and expansion of the law required this. The written law did not (Lev 22:1-16). Only priests needed to make an ablution before eating to cleanse themselves from anything unclean. Christ accused them of also expanding (and negating) the commandment about honoring parents by devoting goods to God, which then could not be used to support the parents (vv 4-6().

B. 15:11. External washings could not keep the Pharisees (or anyone else) spiritually clean. 

C. 15:15. “the parable.” The reference to verse 11.

D. 15:26. “to the dogs.” Children (“the lost sheep of the house of Israel,” v 24) must be fed before dogs. This Gentile woman, like the centurion, showed great faith (v 28) and was rewarded for it. 

E 15:28. Again, Matthew distinguishes the number of men from women and children (cf. 14:21).

IV. Scripture Text Examination. Dr. Michael G. Vanlaningham, M. Div., Ph. D. (MBI), Chapter 15:22-28.

A. “The children’s bread,” is probably a metaphor for the covenant blessings intended for the Jewish people. 

B. “‘Dogs,” a reference to Gentiles, as those outside of the covenant community in Israel.

C. The Canaanite woman’s response in v 27 indicated a surprising level of insight regarding the relationship of the Jewish people’s covenant blessings and the benefit they provide for Gentiles (See Gen 12:3, Rom 11:17-18, Eph 2:11-22).

D. The salvation-historical priority of Jesus was to reach the Jewish people, but as the Great Commission (Mt 28:18-20) indicates, even Gentiles benefit from the Jewish Messiah. 

V. Summing it up. It is clear from the Scripture context, and the commentary of Drs. Ryrie and Vanlaningham, that the fifteenth chapter of Matthew, as well as all prior chapters relate to the offer of Jesus of the Davidic Kingdom, that was made to the Jews of Israel, and only to Jews. Additionally,  the synoptic gospels, of Mathew, Mark, and Luke, do not relate to personal salvation. Only the Gospel of John tells of the offer of individual salvation. Through the ministry of Jesus during His first advent, He is giving the Jews a glimpse of the coming kingdom (Isa 61:2, “to comfort all who mourn.”), which will take be present on earth after His second Advent.

VI. For education and other supporting data for each source of information in this article, please refer to my Page, “About My References.”

Matthew 14 (Part 1 of 2)

I. Video. Matthew Chapter 14.

A. Title. John the Baptist Beheaded – Jesus Feeds the Five Thousand …more

B. Data. LuisetReneeandBill

C. Scriptures. Matthew Chapter 14:1-21.

II. Dr. John F. Walvoord (Overview).

A. Execution of John the Baptist, 14:1-12.

1. The growing rejection of Christ and His ministry, anticipated in the preceding chapter, now had its toll in the execution of John the Baptist. John had been fearless in his denunciation of Herod Antipas who was living unlawfully with Herodias, his brother Philip’s wife. Herodias, a New Testament Jezebel, had plotted against Herod’s first wife, the daughter of Aretas, king of Arabia, who had to flee for her life. Herodias, although a niece of Herod Antipas, began to live with him in an unlawful union.

2. John had said plainly, “It is not lawful for thee to have her” (Mt. 14:4). For this affront to Herod and Herodias, John had been placed in prison, but Herod was restrained from doing more because he feared the reaction of the Jews who counted John as a prophet.

3. This did not deter Herodias, however, but she bided her time. When Herod was having a drunken feast in honor of his birthday, she had her daughter, Salome, dance before those celebrating the birthday. This pleased Herod to the point that he promised Salome anything she would ask, to half the kingdom. She, having been instructed by her mother, asked for the head of John the Baptist on a large platter, such as was used for food. Herod, although reluctant to give the order, nevertheless, under the pressure of the circumstances, commanded that it should be done. John, summoned out of his dark cell where he had had gloomy thoughts about his own future and the future of the kingdom, ended his lifework abruptly at the executioner’s block, and the head was delivered to the damsel on a platter as she requested. His sorrowful disciples came, claimed the body which had been thrown out as refuse, and gave it a decent burial.

4. For John, it meant leaving the damp castle of Machaerus, built on the cliffs east of the Dead Sea, for a sudden entrance into glory. Like many great prophets before him, he had sealed his testimony with his own blood. When the disciples came to tell Jesus, it was another evidence of the growing rejection of Jesus and His message and a stark reminder of the awfulness of sin and unbelief. Parallel references are found in Mark 6:14-29 and Luke 9:7-9.

B. Feeding of the Five Thousand, 14:13-21.

1. Upon hearing the tidings of John’s execution, Jesus withdrew into an unpopulated place. He wanted to be alone with His disciples and desired to confer with them privately, according to Mark 6:30-31. Although Jesus was rejected by those in authority, the people were still enthusiastic followers of Jesus, and they followed Him out of many cities until they found Him. As Jesus viewed the great multitude, His heart was moved with compassion toward them both for their physical ills and their spiritual needs. All four gospels record this important incident in the life of Jesus (Mk 6:30-44Lk 9:10-17Jn 6:1-14). Although Matthew does not mention that He taught them, Mark 6:34 declares, “He began to teach them many things.”

2. After a long day of teaching and healing, the disciples counseled Jesus to urge the multitude to go away that they might find food in the villages nearby. As far as the disciples were concerned, this was an easy way out. As in the case of the Samaritan woman in John 4, and in the case of the little children who were brought to Jesus in Mark 10, so here they wanted to avoid involvement in the need. But Jesus replied, “They need not depart; give ye them to eat” (Mt 14:16). The disciples, forgetting the power of Jesus to do miraculous things, protested that they had only five loaves and two fishes—enough for one person but not for five thousand.

3. Jesus did not argue with them, but commanded them to bring the five loaves and two fishes to Him. He then ordered the multitude to sit down in an orderly fashion on the grass, and, having the food in His hand, He broke it and gave it to the disciples to distribute. The miracle of multiplication took place, and verse 20 records, “They did all eat, and were filled.” The fragments gathered in twelve baskets were far more than the boy’s lunch that had been placed into the hands of Jesus at the beginning. The multitude, described as five thousand besides the women and children, had been miraculously fed.

4. This illuminating incident of the miraculous power of Jesus to take what little was placed in His hand and to bless it until it was sufficient for the multitude has encouraged all believing hearts. They have realized their own impotence and lack of resources, but have been encouraged by the miraculous power of God to take little and make much of it.

5. Matthew does not mention what is recorded in John 6:14-15, that the multitudes, impressed with this tremendous miracle, not only recognized Christ as the predicted Prophet but wanted to take Him by force and make Him a king. The multitude reasoned that with such a miraculous king who could heal the sick, raise the dead, and multiply food, they had one who had sufficient power to give them victory over the oppression of Rome. Like Moses, who gave manna from heaven and Elisha who miraculously fed a hundred men (2 Ki 4:42-44), Jesus seemed to be a great leader. This was not the way, however, in which the kingdom was to come, and their faith was a superficial confidence that came from having full stomachs. All too soon, some of them would be part of the mob crying, “Crucify him.”

III. Dr. Charles C. Ryrie (Verse comments).

A. 14:1. “Herod the tetrarch.” Herod Antipas, who ruled from 4 B.C. to A.D. 39, son of Herod the Great, and brother of Archelaus (see 2.1; 2:22).

B. 14.3. “Herodias.” The former wife of Herod’s half brother Philip, her uncle. She had been persuaded to leave her husband and marry Herod Antipas, thus committing incest (Lev. 18:16). John condemned him for this, and Antipas knew that John spoke the truth (Mark 6:20).

C. 14:6. “the daughter of Herodias.” Salome (according to Josephus). Her dance was undoubtedly lewd.

D. 14:15. “When it was evening.” The Hebrew day, that is, the interval between dawn and darkness, was divided into three parts: morning, noon, and evening (Ps. 55:17). The Jews distinguished two evenings in the day: the first began about 3 P.M., and the second at sundown (see Ex. 12:6, lit., “between the evenings”). In this verse the first evening is meant, in verse 23 the second.

IV. Dr. Edward E. Hindson (Verse comments).

A. 14:1. The occasion of John’s death signaled a time for Jesus to retreat, lest He provoke an early death, before the appointed time.

B. 14:13-21. The miracle of the feeding of the 5,000 (plus women and children) was the result of the divine person and power of Jesus. As the Creator-God, He multiplied the bread, so that, as each piece was broken off, the original roll still remained intact. No wonder the crowd came back the next day seeking more.

V. Mine. The fact that the ministry of Jesus, and the offer of the Kingdom, was to Jews, and only to Jews, is significant (Matthew 10:5-7).

Matthew 12:31-32 (Blasphemy)

I. Video. Shalom Jerusalem

A. Data. Paul Wilbur.

B. Thoughts. May we continue to offer worship and praise to God, “Father, Son, and Holy Spirit.”

II. Introduction. In order for us to proceed forward in this study we must understand what Jesus meant by the words “blasphemy against the Holy Spirit,” as they relate to the context of the teaching that Jesus had with the Jews of first century Israel. It is also important for us to know that the word “blasphemy” is often used in our world today, without having any basis for truth. We have heard stories of people who believe that they are guilty of having committed blasphemy and, therefore, have a destiny in the lake of fire. We will consider the meaning and context of “blasphemy” in Matthew Chapter 12, and in a scripture of cross reference value in Matthew Chapter 26. This article will show that “the meaning and context” of the term, “blasphemy,” has nothing to do with a person being destined to the lake of fire (Revelation 20:10-15).

III. Chapter Background. Matthew Chapter 12

A. Pharisees Accuse Jesus of Healing by Demonic Power, 12:22-37.

1. Following the many miracles already recorded, an outstanding case of need was presented to the crowd in one who was demon possessed and both blind and dumb. Such a pitiful person should have aroused the sympathy even of the Pharisees. When Jesus, with amazing power, healed him so that he could both speak and see, and by inference cast out the demon, it brought amazement to the people, and they said, “Is not this the son of David?” (v. 23). (Dr. J. Dwight Pentecost).

2. The Pharisees countered by accusing Him of casting out demons by Beelzebub, the prince of demons. Beelzebub was actually a heathen deity, referred to earlier by Jesus in Matthew 10:25, and one supposedly in authority over the demons. (Dr. John F. Walvoord).

3. Jesus answered the Pharisees by showing the illogic of their statement. He pointed out that this would be a kingdom divided against itself. It would be Satan casting out Satan. If the casting out of demons is by Beelzebub, then by whom did the Pharisees who were exorcists cast out demons? The point was that only the power of God or someone under the power of God could accomplish this. (Dr. John F. Walvoord).

4. Jesus then drove home His point. If demons have been actually cast out, then it must have been by the Spirit of God, and then, in the person of Christ, the kingdom of God had come unto them. One could not enter the demonic realm victoriously unless he first had bound the strong man (v. 29). The Pharisees had to make a choice. They were either with Jesus or against Him. But if they were against Him, they were guilty of blasphemy against the Holy Spirit, a sin which by its nature is not forgiven (vv. 31-32). (Dr. John F. Walvoord).

5. There has been much misunderstanding about blasphemy against the Holy Spirit. Here it is properly defined as attributing to Satan what is accomplished by the power of God. Such a sin is not unpardonable in itself, but rather because it rejects the person and work of the Holy Spirit, without whom repentance and restoration are impossible. As far as it applies today, it is not the thought that one seeking pardon will not find it, but rather that one who rejects the Holy Spirit will not seek pardon. It is the ultimate in unbelief. In verse 33, He points out that a good tree brings forth good fruit and a bad tree brings forth bad fruit. They must judge Him on the basis of His works. (Dr. John F. Walvoord).

6. The unbelief of the Pharisees calls forth the strongest language. Christ addressed them, “generation of vipers,” or poisonous snakes. He declared that they were evil and therefore could not speak good and warned them that as unbelievers, every idle word they speak will be called to account on the day of judgment. He concluded in Matthew 12:37, “For by thy words thou shalt be justified, and by thy words thou shalt be condemned.” This was addressed to the unsaved Pharisees, not to Christians who were justified by faith and whose sins had been forgiven. (Dr. John F. Walvoord).

B. Condemnation of the Pharisees. Matthew 12:31-32.

In Chapters eleven and twelve of Matthew, we see the opposition to the King. The great question before Israel is: “Is not this the son of David?” (Matt. 12:23). It is evident that Israel is answering in the negative. Christ shows that both He and His forerunner have been rejected (11:1-9), and this rejection will result in judgment (11:20-24). Because of the ultimate rejection of the cross Christ can
give a new invitation (11:28-30), an invitation to all. In chapter twelve the rejection comes to a climax. The populace was debating the person of Christ (12:23). The answer given by the Pharisees was: “This fellow doth not cast out devils, but by Beelzebub the prince of the devils (12:24.) The Holy Spirit had borne His witnesses to the Person of Christ through His words and His works, and the leaders who examined the evidence have decided that His credentials are the credentials of hell, not those of heaven. The great warning of judicial blindness and judgment is given by the Lord to the nation (12:31-32). (Dr. J. Dwight Pentecost).

C. Scripture Text. Matthew 12:31:32. Ryrie Study Bible.

31 “Therefore I say to you, any sin and blasphemy shall be forgiven people, but blasphemy against the Spirit shall not be forgiven. 32 Whoever speaks a word against the Son of Man, it shall be forgiven him; but whoever speaks against the Holy Spirit, it shall not be forgiven him, either in this age or in the age to come.

1. Verse Examination. Bible Hub. Lexicon. Blasphemy. Matthew 12:31.

 blasphemy. Strongs. 988: slander.

blasphémia: slanderOriginal Word: βλασφημία, ας, ἡ
Part of Speech: Noun, Feminine
Transliteration: blasphémia
Phonetic Spelling: (blas-fay-me’-ah)
Definition: slander
Usage: abusive or scurrilous language, blasphemy.

HELPS Word-studies

Cognate: 988 blasphēmía (from blax, “sluggish/slow,” and 5345 /phḗmē, “reputation, fame”) – blasphemy – literally, slow (sluggish) to call something good (that really is good) – and slow to identify what is truly bad (that really is evil).

Blasphemy (988 /blasphēmía) “switches” right for wrong (wrong for right), i.e. calls what God disapproves, “right” which “exchanges the truth of God for a lie” (Ro 1:25). See 987 (blasphēmeō).

2. Ryrie Study Bible. Verse Examination. Matthew 12:31.

“blasphemy against the Spirit.” Technically, according to the scribes, blasphemy involved direct and explicit abuse of the divine name. Jesus, here, teaches that it also may be the reviling of God by attributing the Spirit’s work to Satan. The special circumstances involved in this blasphemy can not be duplicated today; therefore, this sin can not now be committed. Jesus exhorted the Pharisees to turn and be justified (vv 33, 37 ).

IV. Chapter Background. Matthew Chapter 26.

A. Scripture. Mathew 26:63-65. NASB.

63 But Jesus kept silent. And the high priest said to Him, “I adjure You by the living God, that You tell us whether You are the Christ, the Son of God.” 64 Jesus *said to him, “You have said it yourself; nevertheless I tell you, hereafter you will see the Son of Man sitting at the right hand of Power, and coming on the clouds of heaven.”

65 Then the high priest tore his robes and said, “He has blasphemed! What further need do we have of witnesses? Behold, you have now heard the blasphemy;

B. Trial of Jesus Before Caiaphas and the Sanhedrin. Ryrie Study Bible.

1. In desperation, the high priest addressed Jesus saying, “Answerest thou nothing? what is it which these witness against thee?” (v. 62). Jesus, however, did not answer until the high priest said to Him, “I adjure thee by the living God, that thou tell us whether thou be the Christ, the Son of God” (v. 63). At this official and direct question, Jesus responded, “Thou has said: nevertheless I say unto you, Hereafter shall ye see the Son of man sitting on the right hand of power, and coming in the clouds of heaven” (v. 64).

2. It is strange that the high priest was unable to produce any witnesses to confirm his charges, as Jesus had freely claimed His deity and Messiahship, but the words of Jesus were all the high priest needed. Jesus not only claimed to be “the Christ, the Son of God,” but He added that He would sit at the right hand of God and come in clouds of heaven as the predicted Messiah. This clear claim of deity prompted the high priest to tear his clothes and say, “He hath spoken blasphemy. What think ye?” The crowd answered, “He is guilty of death” (vv. 65-66).

3. The issue was clear enough. If Jesus were not all He claimed to be, indeed He was guilty of death, according to the Jewish law. What the chief priests and the scribes ignored was the fact that Jesus had not only made the claim but He had fully supported it by the very credentials and miracles which the Old Testament had attributed to Him.

C. Verse Examination. Matthew 26:65. Bible Hub. Lexicon. Blasphemy. See Verse Examination. Lexicon. Blasphemy. Matthew 12:31.

D. Ryrie Study Bible. Verse Examination. Matthew 26:65. Ryrie Study Bible.

“the high priest tore his robes.” An action expressing grief and horror at hearing what he considered to be blasphemy, Christ having claimed to be God.

V. Summing it up.

1. To tell someone that they have blasphemed the Holy Spirit, and are destined for Hell, is horrible, as well as cruel. The Scripture in question (Matthew 12:31), very clearly shows that no one today is guilty of committing such an offense (check the Lexicon explanation of the meaning of blasphemy). Check also the Ryrie notes on 12:31 and 26:63-65, and it will be clear that no one today can commit such an offense. The problem that Jesus had was with the Jewish leaders, and not with the common Jews. The Jewish leaders accused Jesus of committing Blasphemy, and not the other way around. The penalty that the unbelieving Jews were demanding, as relating to Jesus. was death, physical death, which would come at the hands of the Romans, and would not come from the Providence of Yeshua.

2.In Matt 12:24, the charge that was made against Jesus was: 24 “This man casts out demons only by Beelzebul the ruler of the demons.” There has been much misunderstanding about blasphemy against the Holy Spirit. Here it is properly defined as attributing to Satan what is accomplished by the power of God.

3. In Matt 26:65, Jesus had freely claimed His deity and Messiahship, but the words of Jesus were all the high priest needed. Jesus not only claimed to be “the Christ, the Son of God,” but He added that He would sit at the right hand of God and come in clouds of heaven as the predicted Messiah. This clear claim of deity prompted the high priest to tear his clothes and say, “He hath spoken blasphemy. What think ye?” The crowd answered, “He is guilty of death” (vv. 65-66). The issue was clear enough. If Jesus were not all He claimed to be, indeed He was guilty of death, according to the Jewish law. What the chief priests and the scribes ignored was the fact that Jesus had not only made the claim but He had fully supported it by the very credentials and miracles which the Old Testament had attributed to Him. (notice that we are not under Jewish law).

4. In the two scriptural examples of blasphemy, it is clear that no one in today’s guilty can be guilty of committing blasphemy. Also, John 3:16 is permanent, as to its teaching of the unending security and salvation of any believer in Christ.

5. As has been stated in the past, the synoptic gospels (Matthew, Mark and Luke) relate to the offer by Jesus, of the Davidic Kingdom to the nation of Israel, and was not a gospel of soul winning. To get into the teaching of soul winning, John’s Gospel is the source of such information. In addition to John 3:16, consider John 17:3, and John 20:30-31.

VI. Sources. Each of the following book sources should be considered for purchase and used in studies of God’s Holy Word, especially as it relates to its end times teachings.

A. Things To Come, J. Dwight Pentecost, Dallas Theological Seminary. (Th. M., Th. D.).

VI. Acknowledgements. It is important for readers of these articles to know that my sources of information come from biblically sound theologians. Presidents, Instructors, and graduates from Dallas Theological Seminary and Moody Bible Institute are widely known for their sound understanding of Scripture. It has been a blessing for me to have read books, and watched teaching videos that have an origin from those two seminaries. Please check out the following details that tell of each of the seminaries.

A. Dallas Theological Seminary.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dallas_Theological_Seminary

B. Moody Bible Institute.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Moody_Bible_Institute

Matthew 13:3,11 (The Mysteries Of The Kingdom Of Heaven)

I. Video. In The Presence of Jehovah.

A. Data. Terry MacAlmon.

B. Thoughts. As we learn more about the future that we will have with Jesus, LORD OF LORD, AND KING OF KINGS (Revelation 19:11), let us not neglect the worship of our Lord in our daily lives.

II. Introduction. In order for us to proceed forward in this study we must understand what Jesus meant by the words “parable” and “kingdom,” as they relate to the context of the teaching that Jesus had with the Jews of first century Israel.

A. Scripture Passage. (Matt 13:3)He (Jesus) spoke many things to them (Disciples) in parables. (Matt 13:11)“To you it has been granted to know the mysteries of the kingdom of heaven, but to them it has not been granted.

B. Mysteries and Parables Explanation (The Coming Kingdom).

1. Regarding the kingdom mysteries of Matthew 13, as explained in previous articles, when the parables of Matthew 13 are understood together, we can gain a picture of the course of the present “mystery age.” (p104).

2. Despite this unprecedented opportunity, Israel rejected the kingdom offer (Matt. 12) leading to the kingdom’s postponement. Due to this postponement, Christ began to explain the spiritual conditions that would prevail during the kingdom’s absence. This interim program includes His revelation of the kingdom mysteries (Matt. 13) and the church (Matt. 16:18). Regarding the kingdom mysteries of Matthew 13, as explained in previous articles, when the parables of Matthew 13 are understood together, we can gain a picture of the course of the present “mystery age.” (p140)

C. The Theocratic Administrator and the Theocratic Kingdom (The Coming Kingdom).

Because today’s evangelical world largely believes that the church is presently experiencing the messianic kingdom, we began a study chronicling what the Bible teaches concerning this important issue of the kingdom. That there will be a future, messianic kingdom on earth has been revealed thus far through the divine intention to restore the office of Theocratic Administrator (Gen. 1:26-28) that was lost in Eden (Gen. 3). Likewise, the promise of a future, earthly, messianic reign was prophesied in the Abrahamic Covenant (Gen. 15) and related sub-covenants. It was also explained that while these covenants guarantee that the kingdom will one day come to the earth through Israel, according to the Mosaic Covenant, the kingdom’s ultimate manifestation is conditioned upon the nation’s acceptance of Christ as her long-awaited king during the final events of the future Tribulation period. The previous article also explained how God restored the office of Theocratic Administrator that was lost in Eden, at least in a limited sense, at Sinai. This theocratic arrangement covered most of Old Testament history as God, even after the time of Moses, governed Israel indirectly through Joshua, various judges, and finally, Israel’s kings until the Babylonian Captivity ended the Theocracy (p7-10).

D. The use of the term kingdom of heaven (Things To Come).

1. In the Scriptures the term “kingdom” is used in seven different ways: (1) The Gentile kingdoms, (2) the kingdoms of Israel and Judah, (3) the kingdom of Satan, (4) God’s universal kingdom, (5) a spiritual kingdom, (6) the millennial Davidic kingdom, and (7) the mystery form of the kingdom. For the purposes of this study, we will discuss the spiritual, millennial, and mystery forms of the kingdom (p142). (The Theocratic Kingdom is described above, mine).

2. The spiritual kingdom, which is closely related with God’s universal kingdom, is composed of the elect of all ages, who have experienced a new birth by the power of the Holy Spirit. This kingdom can not be entered into apart from a new birth. It is referred to in Matt 6:33; John 3:3-5, etc. (p142).

3.The millennial kingdom is declared to be a literal earthly kingdom over which Christ rules from David’s throne in fulfillment of the Davidic covenant (2 Sam 7:8-17, Matt 1:1, Luke 1:32). This kingdom is the subject of OT prophecy (2 Sam 7:8-17; Isa 9:6-7; 11:1-16; Jere 23:5, etc. This kingdom was proclaimed as being “at hand” at Christ’s first advent (Matt 3:2; 4:27; 10:5-7); but was rejected by Israel and therefore postponed (Matt 23:37-39). It will again be announced to Israel in the tribulation period (Matt 24:14). It will be received by Israel and set up at the second advent of Christ (Isa 24:23; Rev 19:11-16; 20:1-6) (142).

4.The mystery form of the kingdom brings us to a concept entirely distinct from the preceding two. That God was going to establish a kingdom on earth was no mystery. Since the first sin in heaven, when god’s sovereignty was challenged, it was His purpose to manifest His sovereignty by the establishment of a kingdom over when He ruled. When Adam was created dominion was given to him (Gen 1:26) so he might manifest the sovereignty that belonged to God, which was Adam’s by appointment. But Adam sinned and there was no such manifestation of God’s authority. The reign of conscience was intended to bear evidence to the individual as to his responsibility to the sovereignty to God, but man failed under this test. Human government was ordained that men might recognize that government was a manifestation of God’s sovereignty, but man rebelled against that. God appointed Judges so that these might manifest God’s authority, but man rejected this display of sovereignty. God instituted a theocracy, in which God was recognized as sovereign, but the nation chosen to manifest this display of sovereignty rebelled (1 Sam. 8:7). God then revealed His program to manifest His sovereignty through David’s seed who would reign (2 Sam 7:16). And when Christ came, even this manifestation of God’s purpose to re-establish sovereignty was rejected. Sinful man has consistently rejected each manifestation of the authority of God. Within this program of God, it was not the fact that God was going to establish a kingdom that was an unrevealed secret. The mystery was the fact that when the One in whom this program was to be realized was publicly presented He would be rejected and an age would fall between His ejection and the fulfillment of God’s purpose of sovereignty at His second advent. The mystery form of of the kingdom, then, has reference to the age between the two advents of Christ. The mysteries of the kingdom of heaven describe the conditions that prevail on the earth in that interim while the king is absent. These mysteries thus relate this present age to the eternal purposes of God in regard to His kingdom (p142, 143). (The Mystery Kingdom is also known as the inter-advent age, mine).

III. Sources. Each of the following book sources should be considered for purchase and used in studies of God’s Holy Word, especially as it relates to its end times teachings.

A. The Coming Kingdom, Dr. Andrew M. Woods, Dallas Theological Seminary. (Th. M., J.D., Ph. D.)

http://andywoodsministries.org/
http://www.spiritandtruth.org/teaching/teachers/andy_woods/bio.htm?x=x
https://dispensationalpublishing.com/chafer-theological-seminary-an-interview-with-the-new-president-dr-andy-woods/
http://www.spiritandtruth.org/teaching/
https://www.amazon.com/Coming-Kingdom-Theology-Changing-Church/dp/1939110211

B. Things To Come, J. Dwight Pentecost, Dallas Theological Seminary. (Th. M., Th. D.)

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/J._Dwight_Pentecost

IV. Acknowledgements. It is important for readers of these articles to know that my sources of information come from biblically sound theologians. Presidents, Instructors, and graduates from Dallas Theological Seminary and Moody Bible Institute are widely known for their sound understanding of Scripture. It has been a blessing for me to have read books, and watched teaching videos that have an origin from those two seminaries. Please check out the following details that tell of each of the seminaries.

A. Dallas Theological Seminary.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dallas_Theological_Seminary

B. Moody Bible Institute.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Moody_Bible_Institute

Matthew 13 (2 of 2)

I. Video.  Matthew Chapter 13 (2 of 2)

A. Title. The Parable of the Weeds Explained – The Parables of the Hidden Treasure and the Pearl – The Parable of the Net – A Prophet Without Honor

B. Data:  LuisetReneeandBill.

C. Scriptures. Matthew Chapter 13:36-58. 

II. J. Dwight Pentecost, Th. M., Th. D. 1915-2014; Things To Come

The Course of this Present Age.

p140. The age from the rejection of the Messiah by Israel unto his reception by Israel at His second advent is outlined in two portions of the Word: Matthew 13 and Revelation 2 and 3; the former from the viewpoint of God’s kingdom program, and latter from the viewpoint of the church program.

Matthew 13.

p140. Matt 13 reveals that our Lord is speaking in order that He may give the course of the “mysteries of the kingdom of heaven.” This instruction comes through the proper interpretation of the parables which are recorded here. There are three different basic approaches to this chapter. There are, first of all, those who divorce any prophetic significance from this passage and study it only for its spiritual of moral lessons as it affects believers today. Since they emphasize the unity of God’s purpose from the fall of man until the eternal state, they fail to make any distinction between God’s program for Israel and that for the church and, as a consequence, they see only church truth in this portion…..There are those, in the second place, who, recognizing the distinction between Israel and the church, hold that this portion is totally limited to God’s program for Israel and relegate it to a revelation concerning Israel in the tribulation period when God is preparing them for the coming King…..Then, there are those, in the third place, who believe that this potion of scripture gives a picture of conditions on the earth in respect to the placement of the kingdom program during the time of the King’s absence from the earth. These parables describe the events of the entire inter-advent period. Such is the approach to the passage adopted to this study.

p141. The setting of the chapter in the Gospel. The Gospel of Matthew is the Gospel which presents the Lord Jesus Christ as Yahweh’s King and Israel’s Messiah. This 13th chapter holds a unique place in the development of the theme of the Gospel. Throughout the book, Christ is seen in His presentation as Messiah. In chapters 11-12 we see we see the opposition to the King. In chapter 12, the rejection comes to a climax. Now that Israel has rejected the offered kingdom, the question naturally arises, “What will happen to God’s program, now that the kingdom has been rejected and the Kingdom is to be absent. Since this kingdom was the subject of an irrevocable covenant, it was unthinkable that it could be abandoned. This chapter gives the events in the development of the kingdom program from the time of its rejection until it is received when the nation welcomes the King at His second advent.

p143. The mystery form of the kingdom has reference to the age between the two advents of Christ. The mysteries of the kingdom describes the conditions that prevail on the earth in that interim while the king is absent. These mysteries thus relate this present age to the eternal purposes of God in regard to His kingdom.

III. Charles C. Ryrie. B.A., Th. M., Th. D., Ph. D.. Litt. D., (1925-2016).

Chapter 13 Notes.

13:44-46. The parables of the treasure and pearl indicate the incomparable value of the kingdom, which will cause a man to do everything to possess it. Another possible interpretation equates the man with Christ (as in v. 37) who sacrifices His all to purchase His people.

13:47-50. Similar to the parable of the wheat and tares. Both genuine and professing people will coexist in the kingdom, to be separated at the end of the age.

13:55. “his brothers.” These were the sons of Joseph and Mary subsequent to the birth of Jesus. To understand them as sons of Joseph by a former marriage, or cousins of Jesus, is contrary to the visual sense of “brothers.”

IV. Scofield Reference Bible. C. I. Scofield. D.D., 1843-1921). 

Chapter 13 Notes.

13:45-46. The pearl of great value.

Such, then, is the mystery form of the kingdom. (See Scofield “ :-“) . See Scofield “ :-“. It is the sphere of Christian profession during this age. It is a mingled body of true and false, wheat and tares, good and bad. It is defiled by formalism, doubt, and worldliness. But within it Christ sees the true children of the true kingdom who, at the end, are to “shine forth as the sun.” In the great field, the world, He sees the redeemed of all ages, but especially His hidden Israel, yet to be restored and blessed, Also, in this form of the kingdom, so unlike that which is to be, He sees the Church, His body and bride, and for joy He sells all that He has 2 Corinthians 8:9 and buys the field, the treasure, and the pearl. end of the consummation of the age. Matthew 24:3.

V. John F. Walvoord. A.B., M.A., Th. B., Th. M., Th. D., D.D., Litt. D. (1910-2002).

https://bible.org/users/john-f-walvoordhttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Walvoord  

https://www.thriftbooks.com/a/john-f-walvoord/203232/
(1910-2012) long-time president of Dallas Theological Seminary, was one of the most prominent evangelical scholars of his generation. He is considered perhaps the world’s foremost interpreter of biblical prophecy

The parable of the mustard seed is also found in Mark 4, where it is related to the kingdom of God. This has supported the view of many that the kingdom of God and the kingdom of heaven are identical, as they are occasionally found in parallel passages. There is some indication in Scripture, however, that the kingdom of heaven emphasizes the professing character of the kingdom as including unbelievers who look like believers, as illustrated in the tares, in contrast to the kingdom of God, containing only true believers. It is significant that the kingdom of God is not compared to the second parable, that of the wheat and the tares, as those in the kingdom of God are genuine believers. Putting Matthew and Mark together, the conclusion can be reached that both the number of true believers (the kingdom of God) as well as the sphere of profession in the present age (the kingdom of heaven) will grow rapidly. This is in contrast to the future millennial kingdom, which Christ will bring at His second coming, which will begin abruptly as a worldwide kingdom, rather than as a product of gradual growth.

VI. Dr. Thomas L. Constable., A. B., Th. M. Th. D.

https://faithlife.com/thomas-l-constable/aboutThe Synoptic Problem http://www.godsbreathpublications.com/dr-constable-expository-bible-notes/

Matthew recorded increasing polarization in this section. Jesus expanded His ministry, but as He did so opposition became even more intense. The Jewish leaders became increasingly hostile. Consequently Jesus spent more time preparing His disciples. Jesus revealed Himself more clearly to His disciples, but they only understood some of what He told them. They strongly rejected other things He said. The inevitability of a final confrontation between Jesus and His critics became increasingly clear. The general movement in this section is Jesus withdrawing from Israel’s leaders (Matthew 13:54 to Matthew 16:12) and preparing His disciples for His passion (Matthew 16:13 to Matthew 19:2).

VII.  My Bucket List shows the references that I consult, of theologians and printed resources, whenever I write an article that will be posted. Please find the Pages of my site to find Bucket List.

VIII. My Websites To Follow

https://equippingblog.wordpress.com/ Eternity

https://newsandcommentary38395276.wordpress.com/ Thy Kingdom Come

Matthew Chapter 13 (1 of 2)

I. Video.  Matthew Chapter 13 (1 of 2)

A. Title. The Parable of the Sower – The Parable of the Weeds – The Parable of the Mustard Seed -The Leaven

B. Data:  LuisetReneeandBill.

C. Scriptures. Matthew Chapter 13:1-35. 

J. Dwight Pentecost, Th. M., Th. D. 1915-2014; Things To Come,  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/J._Dwight_Pentecost

P 109. It can be shown that in all the preaching concerning the kingdom by John (3:2), by Christ (Matt 4:17), by the twelve (Matt 10:5-7), by the seventy (Lk 10:1-12), not once is the kingdom offered to Israel anything but an earthly literal kingdom. Even after the rejection of that offer by Israel, and the announcement of the mystery of the kingdom (Matt 13) Christ anticipates such a literal earthly kingdom (Matt 25:1-13, 31-4 6). The New Testament never relates the kingdom promised to David to Christ’s present session.

P129. Any individual who refers to the Scriptures as the Old and New Testaments bears witness to the fact that God has divided His program into time segments. The history of revelation evidences the progress of divine revelation through successive ages. The dispensational study of the Bible consists in the identification of certain well-defined time periods which are divinely indicated, together with the revealed purpose of God relative to each.

P148. The parable of the mustard and the leaven hidden in meal, then, stress the growth of the inter-advent age (has been called the mystery form of the kingdom). 

P177. It must be borne in mind that the purpose of Matthew 13 is not to divulge the history of the church, but the history of the kingdom in its mystery form. The time is not that of the church — from Pentecost to the rapture — but the entire time from the rejection of Christ to His coming reception. Therefore, it seems to have been a mistake, into which many writers fell, to say that the wheat of the parable represents the church. Rather, the Lord is indicating that during the age there is to be a sowing of the seed (the parable of the sower), and also a counter-sowing (the parable of the tares), and that this condition will continue throughout the age. At the end of the age there will be a separation of those who were the children of the kingdom and those who were the children of the evil one. The tribulation period ends with judgment on all enemies of the King. Thus, every unbeliever is removed. Following these judgments the kingdom is instituted into which the righteous are taken. This is perfectly consistent with the teaching of the parable. 

P464. In the parables (Matt 13:1-50), the Lord outlines the program in the development of the theocratic kingdom during the period of the King’s absence, and announces the inception of an entirely new, unheralded and unexpected program — the church (Matt 16:13-20). He prepares the disciples for a long delay in the kingdom program as it relates to Israel (Lk 19:11-27).He promises the second advent, at which time the kingdom program with Israel will be resumed (Matt 24:27-31), and gives the nation signs that will herald His second advent (Matt 24:4-26). He prepares the disciples for their ministry in the new age (John 14-16), but promises them participation in the kingdom, despite its delay (Matt 19:28-30; Lk 22:28-30). The Lord even gives to the disciples a miniature and premature picture of the second coming of Christ to establish His kingdom (Matt 16:27-17:8). Thus we see that the Lord is preparing the disciples for the withdrawal of the offer of the kingdom and the institution of a new program and age before the kingdom program is consummated.   

P467. Concerning the kingdom program in the present age, that God is continuing the development of his overall theocratic kingdom program  is presented in the parables of Matthew 13. It was entirely unknown in the Old Testament that a great interval of time would intervene between the offer of the kingdom by Messiah at His coming to the earth and the reception of that offer. The parables of Matthew 13 reveal the whole course of the development of the theocratic kingdom from the rejection of the King by Israel during His first advent until His reception as Messiah by Israel at His second advent. In Luke 19:11-27, the whole program is developed. 

III. Charles C. Ryrie. B.A., Th. M., Th. D., Ph. D.. Litt. D., (1925-2016).

Charles Ryrie https://www.amazon.com/Charles-Caldwell-Ryrie/e/B001HMRTWW
Charles Ryrie https://www.moodypublishers.com/authors/r/charles-ryrie/

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Charles_Caldwell_RyrieChapter 13 Notes

13:3.”parables.” A parable is a figure of speech in which a moral or spiritual truth is illustrated by an analogy drawn from everyday experiences. These parables present truths about the kingdom in this present day. These truths are called “mysteries” (v 11) because they were not revealed in the OT, and they are revealed by Christ only to those who are properly related to Him (vv 11-13; Mk 4:11-12). The Jewish leaders’ rejection of Christ reached a climax in the “unpardonable sin” of the previous chapter. Though that rejection would continue and strengthen, Jesus now turns to instructing His disciples about the present dispensation (a mystery, Eph 3:5-6) between the first and second comings of the Lord.

13:4. “birds” represent evil (v 19; Rev 18:20).

13:5 “rocky places.” Shallow soil on top of solid rock.

13:13-15, Those who were rejecting Him would not understand these new truths, as Isaiah predicted (Isa 6:9-10).

13:18-23, The parable teaches that there would be four different responses to the Word: no response, emotional response, worldly response, and fruitful response.

13: 25. “tares.” Weeds, in this case probably darnel, which in the blade resembles wheat but which can be distinguished from wheat when fully ripe. 

13:32. “smaller than all other seeds.” Lit., lesser of all seeds. It is among the smallest seeds and was the smallest used in Israel. The parables are designed to reveal the mysteries of the kingdom, that is, the present age, which will grow quickly. 

V. Scofield Reference Bible. C. I. Scofield. D.D., 1843-1921). 

13:24. This parable Matthew 13:24-30 is also interpreted by our Lord Matthew 13:36-43. Here the “good seed” is not the “word,” as in the first parable Matthew 13:19Matthew 13:23 but rather that which the word has produced. 1 Peter 1:231 Peter 1:23 viz.: the children of the kingdom. These are, providentially Matthew 13:37 “sown,” i.e. scattered, here and there in the “field” of the “world” Matthew 13:38. The “world” here is both geographical and ethnic–the earth-world, and also the world of men. The wheat of God at once becomes the scene of Satan’s activity. Where children of the kingdom are gathered, there “among the wheat” Matthew 13:25Matthew 13:38Matthew 13:39. Satan “sows” “children of the wicked one,” who profess to be children of the kingdom, and in outward ways are so like the true children that only the angels may, in the end, be trusted to separate them Matthew 13:28-30Matthew 13:40-43. So great is Satan’s power of deception that the tares often really suppose themselves to be children of the kingdom Matthew 7:21-23. Many other parables and exhortations have this mingled condition in view (e.g.)

Indeed, it characterizes Matthew from Chapter 13 to the end. The parable of the wheat and tares is not a description of the world, but of that which professes to be the kingdom. Mere unbelievers are never the children of the devil, but only religious unbelievers are so called (cf) Matthew 13:38John 8:38-44Matthew 23:15.

13:30. The gathering of the tares into bundles for burning does not imply immediate judgment. At the end of this age (Matthew 13:40) the tares are set apart for burning, but first the wheat is gathered into the barn. ; John 14:31 Thessalonians 4:14-17.

13:31. The parable of the Mustard Seed prefigures the rapid but unsubstantial growth of the mystery form of the kingdom from an insignificant beginning Acts 1:15Acts 2:411 Corinthians 1:26 to a great place in the earth. The figure of the fowls finding shelter in the branches is drawn from Daniel 4:20-22. How insecure was such a refuge the context in Daniel shows. kingdom (See Scofield “Daniel 4:20-27.4.22- :“) .

13:33 (1) Leaven, as a symbolic or typical substance, is always mentioned in the O.T. in an evil sense Genesis 19:3Genesis 19:3 (See Scofield “Genesis 19:3- :“) .

(2) The use of the word in the N.T. explains its symbolic meaning. It is “malice and wickedness,” as contrasted with “sincerity and truth” 1 Corinthians 5:6-81 Corinthians 5:6-8 it is evil doctrine Matthew 16:12 in its three-fold form of Pharisasism, Sadduceeism, Herodianism ; Matthew 16:6Mark 8:15. The leaven of the Pharisees was externalism in religion. Matthew 23:14Matthew 23:16Matthew 23:23-28 of the Sadducees, scepticism as to the supernatural and as to the Scriptures Matthew 22:23Matthew 22:29 of the Herodians, worldliness–a Herod party amongst the Jews ; Matthew 22:16-21Mark 3:6.

(3) The use of the word in Matthew 13:33 is congruent with its universal meaning. 

VI. John F. Walvoord. A.B., M.A., Th. B., Th. M., Th. D., D.D., Litt. D. (1910-2002).

https://bible.org/users/john-f-walvoordhttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Walvoord  

https://www.thriftbooks.com/a/john-f-walvoord/203232/
(1910-2012) long-time president of Dallas Theological Seminary, was one of the most prominent evangelical scholars of his generation. He is considered perhaps the world’s foremost interpreter of biblical prophecy

The thirteenth chapter of Matthew marks a new division in the gospel, in which Jesus addresses Himself to the problem of what will occur when He goes back to heaven as the rejected King. The gospel of Matthew began with the proofs that Jesus was indeed the promised Son who would reign on the throne of David (chap. 1), supported by the visit of the wise men and the early ministry of John the Baptist (chaps. 2-3). After His temptation, Jesus presented the principles of His coming kingdom in the Sermon on the Mount (chaps. 5-7), emphasizing spiritual and moral principles that govern the kingdom of God, but especially as these applied to the prophesied kingdom on earth, which the Messiah-King was to bring when He came. The Sermon on the Mount accordingly contained timeless truths always applicable, some truths that were immediately applicable to Christ’s day on earth, and some truths that were to have their fulfillment in the millennial kingdom.

VII. Summary. As you read through the verses and notes of Matthew 13, it will be clear that Jesus was speaking to Jews, and that none of the verses, or Old Testament reference verses, apply to Gentiles. This inter-advent age, which spans the period of time from the first advent of Christ to His second advent. This time period is also the time period in which we are living. To put all of this together, the parables that are found in Matthew 13 represent the spiritual conditions of the present age while the kingdom remains in a state of postponement. These parables, when collectively considered, reveal the coexistence of both good and evil during the inter-advent age. Thus, during this age, both Satan and God will be at work. However, God’s work notwithstanding, the present age should not be confused with what the Old Testament reveals concerning the Messianic Kingdom. Neither should this divine activity be category as a “mystery form of the kingdom”

VIII.  My Bucket List shows the references that I consult, of theologians and printed resources, whenever I write an article that will be posted. Please find the Pages of my site to find Bucket List.

IX. My Websites To Follow

https://equippingblog.wordpress.com/ Eternity

https://newsandcommentary38395276.wordpress.com/ Thy Kingdom Come

Mathew Chapter 12 (2 of 2)

I. Video.  Matthew Chapter 12 (2 of 2)

A. Title. The Sign of Jonah – Jesus’ Mother and Brothers

B. Data:  LuisetReneeandBill.

C. Scriptures. Matthew 12:38-50. 

J. Dwight Pentecost, Th. M., Th. D. 1915-2014; Things To Come https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/J._Dwight_Pentecost


12:45: The word “dwell” used here is a strong word. It is used to describe the fulness of the Godhead that dwelt in Christ (Col 2:9); it is used of Christ’s taking up a permanent abode in the believer’s heart (Eph 3:17), and of demons returning to take absolute possession of a man (Matt 12:45). It is to be distinguished from the general term for “dwell” which has the the idea of transitoriness, “to sojourn.” p 197

12:46-50. Now that Israel has rejected the offered kingdom, the question naturally arises, “what will happen to God’s kingdom program now that the kingdom has been rejected and the King is to be absent?” Since the kingdom was the subject of an irrevocable covenant it was unthinkable that it could be abandoned. The chapter gives the events in the development of the kingdom program from the time of its rejection until it is received when the nation welcomes the King at His second advent. pp 141-142

12:46:50. Because the nation (Israel) had rejected Him, the Lord announces the severance of every natural tie by which He was bound to the nation. From this announcement of the Lord concerning the rejection of the nation a definite movement may be traced in the withdrawal of the offer of the kingdom. pp 463-464.

III. Charles C. Ryrie. B.A., Th. M., Th. D., Ph. D.. Litt. D., (1925-2016).

https://www.amazon.com/Charles-Caldwell-Ryrie/e/B001HMRTWW
https://www.moodypublishers.com/authors/r/charles-ryrie/

Chapter 12 Notes

12:39. “adulterous.” The nation was unfaithful in its vows to the Lord. “the sign of Jonah the prophet.” In 16:4 and Luke 11:29-32 the sign in the warning of judgment to come (cf. Jonah 1:2; 3:4). Here the sign is related to the death and resurrection of the Son of Man.

12:40. “three days and three nights.” This phrase does not necessarily require that 72 hours elapse between Christ’s death and resurrection, for the Jews reckoned part of a day to be part of a day to be a whole day. Thus, this prophecy can be properly fulfilled if the crucifixion occurred on Friday. However, the statement does require an historical Jonah who was actually swallowed by a great fish.

12:41. “something greater.” The greek word is neuter here and in vs 42, and refers to the kingdom of God. 

12:42. Just as the pagan “Queen” of sheba acknowledged the superiority of Solomon’s wisdom, so the Pharisees should recognize that the kingdom of God was a hand.

12:43-45, “unclean spirit” = a demon. (see note on 7:22). Self-reformation, without spiritual conversion, can lead to serious ramifications. Notice that some demons are more wicked than others, and they can repossess a person from whom they have been cast out.

12:50. This means that the spiritual relation between Christ and believers is closer than the closest of blood ties. Obedience to God takes precedence over responsibilities to family.

IV. Scofield Reference Bible. C. I. Scofield. D.D., 1843-1921). 

Scofield produced several major theological works. First, he wrote a book called Rightly Dividing the Word of Truth, which expresses the principles of dispensational hermeneutics. Second, his annotated reference Bible became the standard for a generation. Finally, his Bible correspondence course made his teaching readily available around the world. All three of these works are still available today. Scofield’s impact has been magnified by his influence on Lewis Sperry Chafer, who founded Dallas Theological Seminary. DTS became the most prominent dispensational seminary in the world; its many high-profile graduates include Chuck Swindoll, Tony Evans, David Jeremiah, J. Vernon McGee, Hal Lindsey, Bruce Wilkinson, Alva J. Mc Clain, Charles L. Feinberg, John F. Walvoord, and other highly esteemed theologians.

12:46. Rejected by Israel, those of His own race (compare Rom 9:3) our Lord intimates the formation of the new family of faith which will overstep the racial claims that Israel has known to this time and will receive all those “(whoever,” v 50 also who will be His disciples. Compare Jn 6:28-29).

V. John F. Walvoord. A.B., M.A., Th. B., Th. M., Th. D., D.D., Litt. D. (1910-2002).

https://bible.org/users/john-f-walvoordhttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Walvoord  

https://www.thriftbooks.com/a/john-f-walvoord/203232/
(1910-2012) long-time president of Dallas Theological Seminary, was one of the most prominent evangelical scholars of his generation. He is considered perhaps the world’s foremost interpreter of biblical prophecy.

12:38-46.

Having been challenged to face the evidence that Jesus was indeed who He claimed to be, the unbelieving Pharisees and scribes asked for a particular sign. Jesus recited the experience of Jonah, how he was three days and three nights in the great fish. Jesus described this as a prophetic incident, anticipating that the Son of Man will be three days and three nights in the heart of the earth. Jesus was predicting his death and resurrection would be the supreme sign for those seeking evidence of His claims. The use by Jesus of the prophet Jonah as the only sign these unbelievers would have, brings this interesting observation. 

The Ninevites did not witness the rescuscitation of Jonah for themselves: indeed, there is no evidence he even recounted it to them (Jonah 3:1-4;) The Ninevites experienced the effects of a divine sign they never recognized, and this may be Matthew’s point: the Ninevites repented without recognizing a sign, whereas the opponents of Jesus were too hardhearted to repent despite the signs that he had been giving them….All the Ninevites needed was the preaching of Jonah of the truth, yet Jesus was greater than Jonah (12:41).

VI. Summary. The notes on 12:38-41 are key to understanding this passage of scripture, especially in relation to “3 days and 3 nights.”

VII.  My Bucket List shows the references that I consult, of theologians and printed resources, whenever I write an article that will be posted. Please find the Pages of my site to find Bucket List.

VIII. My Websites To Follow

https://equippingblog.wordpress.com/ Eternity

https://untotheleastofthese.home.blog/ Book Prep

https://newsandcommentary38395276.wordpress.com/ Thy Kingdom Come

Matthew Chapter 12 (1 of 2)

I. Video.  Matthew Chapter 12 (1 of 2)

A. Title. Lord of the Sabbath – God’s Chosen Servant – Jesus and Beelzebub

B. Data:  LuisetReneeandBill.

C. Scriptures: Matthew 12:1-37.

II. Dr. Thomas L.Constable., A. B., Th. M. Th. D.(Notes on Matthew)

https://faithlife.com/thomas-l-constable/aboutThe Synoptic Problem http://www.godsbreathpublications.com/dr-constable-expository-bible-notes/

WRITER 

External evidence strongly supports the Matthean authorship of the first Gospel. The earliest copies of the Gospel we have begin: “KATA MATTHAION” (“according to Matthew”). Several early church fathers referred to Matthew (whose name means “Gift of God” or “Faithful”) as the writer, including: Clement of Rome, Polycarp, Justin Martyr, Clement of Alexandria, Tertullian, and Origen.Papias’ use of the term logia to describe Matthew’s work, cited above, is not clear evidence of Matthean authorship of the first Gospel. Since Matthew was a disciple of Jesus and one of the 12 Apostles, his work carried great influence and enjoyed much prestige from its first appearance. We might expect a more prominent disciple, such as Peter or James, to have written it. The fact that the early church accepted it as from Matthew further strengthens the likelihood that he indeed wrote it.

Internal evidence of Matthean authorship is also strong. As a tax collector for Rome, Matthew would have had to be able to write capably, he would have been a note-taker and preserver (unlike Jews of his time in general), and he probably knew shorthand. His profession forced him to keep accurate and detailed records, which skill he put to good use in composing his Gospel. There are more references to money—and to more different kinds of money—in this Gospel, than in any of the others. It has been estimated that about one-fifth of Jesus’ teachings dealt with money matters. Matthew humbly referred to himself as a tax collector, a profession with objectionable connotations in his culture, whereas the other Gospel writers simply called him Matthew (or Levi). Matthew modestly called his feast for Jesus “dining” (Matt. 9:9-10), but Luke referred to it as “a big reception” (Luke 5:29). All these details confirm the testimony of the early church fathers.

According to tradition, Matthew ministered in Israel for several years after Jesus’ ascension to heaven. He also made missionary journeys to the Jews who lived among the Gentiles outside Israel, Diaspora Jews. There is evidence that he visited Persia, Ethiopia, Syria, and Greece.

“It was no ordinary man who wrote a Gospel which Renan, the French critic, eighteen hundred years later, could call the most important book in the world. How many of our current best sellers will still be leading human thought in A.D. 3600?”

III. Charles C. Ryrie. B.A., Th. M., Th. D., Ph. D.. Litt. D., (1925-2016).

https://www.amazon.com/Charles-Caldwell-Ryrie/e/B001HMRTWW
https://www.moodypublishers.com/authors/r/charles-ryrie/

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Charles_Caldwell_Ryrie

Chapter 12 Notes

12:2. “not lawful to do on a Sabbath.” It was lawful for persons to pick grain from another’s field to satisfy hunger (Deu 23:25) but not to do regular work on the Sabbath (Ex 20:10). The latter was the charge of the Pharisees.

12:3. “what David did.”(See 1 Sam 21:1-6).

12:4. “;the consecrated bread.” Better, bread of the Presence. Twelve cakes, made of fine flour, were placed in the Holy Place in the Tabernacle each day on the table that stood opposite the lampstand. The old bread was eaten by the priests. It was this bread that David requested of Ahimelech, the priest, for himself and his men.

12:5. Priests who work on the Sabbath were not blamed.

12:7. Showing mercy is more pleasing to God than external conformity to the law.

12:16. “not to tell who He was.” Many were drawn to Christ because of His reputation as a healer, which may have been diverting attention from His primary role as Messiah.

12:18-21. For the OT quote, see Isa 42:1-4. Here is one of Matthew’s descriptive gems, highlighting the graciousness and gentleness of Jesus.

12:31: “blasphemy against the Spirit.” Technically, according to the scribes, involved direct and explicit abuse of the divine name. Jesus, here, teaches that it also may be the reviling of God by attributing the Spirit’s work to Satan. The special circumstances involved in this blasphemy can not be duplicated today; therefore, this sin can not be committed. Jesus exhorted the Pharisees to turn and be justified (vs 33, 37 ).

12:36. “careless = useless. 

IV. Scofield Reference Bible. C. I. Scofield. D.D., 1843-1921). 

Scofield produced several major theological works. First, he wrote a book called Rightly Dividing the Word of Truth, which expresses the principles of dispensational hermeneutics. Second, his annotated reference Bible became the standard for a generation. Finally, his Bible correspondence course made his teaching readily available around the world. All three of these works are still available today. Scofield’s impact has been magnified by his influence on Lewis Sperry Chafer, who founded Dallas Theological Seminary. DTS became the most prominent dispensational seminary in the world; its many high-profile graduates include Chuck Swindoll, Tony Evans, David Jeremiah, J. Vernon McGee, Hal Lindsey, and Bruce Wilkinson.
Notes provided by editorial revision committee, including: Charles L. Feinberg, Th. D., Ph. D. (1909-1995)  and John F. Walvoord. A.B., M.A., Th. B., Th. M., Th. D., D.D., Litt. D. (1910-2002).

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Charles_L._Feinberg.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Walvoord

12:18. “Gentiles.”  The rejected King of Israel will turn to the Gentiles (Contrast Mt 10:5-6) In fulfillment this awaited the official rejection ,and the crucifixion and resurrection of Christ (Lk 24:46-48;Acts 9:15; 13:46; 28; 25-28; Rom 11:11).

12:31. Anyone who is concerned about his rejection of Christ has, obviously, not committed the “unpardonable sin,” and can still come to Christ.

V. John F. Walvoord. A.B., M.A., Th. B., Th. M., Th. D., D.D., Litt. D. (1910-2002).

https://bible.org/users/john-f-walvoordhttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Walvoord  

https://www.thriftbooks.com/a/john-f-walvoord/203232/


John Walvoord, long-time president of Dallas Theological Seminary, was one of the most prominent evangelical scholars of his generation. He is considered perhaps the world’s foremost interpreter of biblical prophecy.

Pharisees Accuse Jesus Of Healing by Demonic Power (12:22-37).

Following the many miracles already recorded, an outstanding case of need was presented to the crowd in one who was demon possessed and both blind and dumb. Such a pitiful person should have aroused the sympathy even of the Pharisees. When Jesus, with amazing power, healed him so that he could both speak and see, and by inference cast out the demon, it brought amazement to the people, and they said, “Is not this the son of David?” (v. 23).

The Pharisees countered by accusing Him of casting out demons by Beelzebub, the prince of demons. Beelzebub was actually a heathen deity, referred to earlier by Jesus in Matthew 10:25, and one supposedly in authority over the demons.

Jesus answered the Pharisees by showing the illogic of their statement. He pointed out that this would be a kingdom divided against itself. It would be Satan casting out Satan. If the casting out of demons is by Beelzebub, then by whom did the Pharisees who were exorcists cast out demons? The point was that only the power of God or someone under the power of God could accomplish this.

Jesus then drove home His point. If demons have been actually cast out, then it must have been by the Spirit of God, and then, in the person of Christ, the kingdom of God had come unto them. One could not enter the demonic realm victoriously unless he first had bound the strong man (v. 29). The Pharisees had to make a choice. They were either with Jesus or against Him. But if they were against Him, they were guilty of blasphemy against the Holy Spirit, a sin which by its nature is not forgiven (vv. 31-32).

There has been much misunderstanding about blasphemy against the Holy Spirit. Here it is properly defined as attributing to Satan what is accomplished by the power of God. Such a sin is not unpardonable in itself, but rather because it rejects the person and work of the Holy Spirit, without whom repentance and restoration are impossible. As far as it applies today, it is not the thought that one seeking pardon will not find it, but rather that one who rejects the Holy Spirit will not seek pardon. It is the ultimate in unbelief. In verse 33, He points out that a good tree brings forth good fruit and a bad tree brings forth bad fruit. They must judge Him on the basis of His works.

The unbelief of the Pharisees calls forth the strongest language. Christ addressed them, “generation of vipers,” or poisonous snakes. He declared that they were evil and therefore could not speak good and warned them that as unbelievers, every idle word they speak will be called to account on the day of judgment. He concluded in Matthew 12:37, “For by thy words thou shalt be justified, and by thy words thou shalt be condemned.” This was addressed to the unsaved Pharisees, not to Christians who were justified by faith and whose sins had been forgiven.

VI. Summary.

As has been the case with the prior chapters of this study, this chapter continues to show that the subjects of the Gospel of Matthew are the Jews of the nation of Israel. The verses in which Christ offers for reference would have been known to Jews, but not to Gentiles. Jesus makes a comment in reference to the Gentiles, which is found in 12:18, 21, but was not directed to any Gentile. In 12:31,32, we come across a passage that many believers understand as being “the unpardonable sin.” But, the unpardonable sin is that of “unbelief,” which is addressed in the Gospel of John, in 3:16-18. The unpardonable sin, which is stated as being “the sin of the world” is that which Jesus resolves as is written in John 1:29. The sins that are stated in Matthew relate to the Jews, and their disobedience to the Law. Jesus, in offering the Kingdom to Israel, is saying to Jews, ” I am offering the Kingdom to you; now, you should act like Kingdom people. Jews could have been guilty of theft, but that sin would not have prevented them having eternal life with Jesus. The sin of unbelief is a sin that is unpardonable, but can easily be resolved, “by belief in Christ.”

VII.  My Bucket List shows the references that I consult, of theologians and printed resources, whenever I write an article that will be posted. Please find the Pages of my site to find Bucket List.

VIII. My Websites To Follow

https://equippingblog.wordpress.com/ Eternity

https://untotheleastofthese.home.blog/ Book Prep

https://newsandcommentary38395276.wordpress.com/ Thy Kingdom Come

Matthew Chapter 11 (Jesus and John the Baptist – Woe on Unrepentant Cities – Rest for the Weary)

I. Video.  Matthew Chapter 11

A. Title. Jesus and John the Baptist – Woe on Unrepentant Cities – Rest for the Weary

B. Data:  LuisetReneeandBill.

II. Dr. Thomas L.Constable., A. B., Th. M. Th. D.(Notes on Matthew)

https://faithlife.com/thomas-l-constable/aboutThe Synoptic Problem http://www.godsbreathpublications.com/dr-constable-expository-bible-notes/

Genre 

Genre refers to the type of literature that a particular document fits within. Certain types of literature have features that affect their interpretation. For example, we interpret letters differently than poems. So it is important to identify the genre or genres of a book of the Bible.

The Gospels are probably more like ancient Greco-Roman biographies than any other type of literature. This category is quite broad and encompasses works of considerable diversity, including the Gospels. Even Luke, with its characteristic historiographic (written history) connections to Acts, qualifies as ancient biography. Unlike this genre, however, the Gospels “combine teaching and action in a preaching-oriented work that stands apart from anything else in the ancient world.” The Gospels also are anonymous, in the sense that the writers did not identify themselves as the writers, as Paul did in his epistles, for example. And they are not as pretentious as most ancient biographies. The word “gospel,” by the way, comes from the old Saxon God’s spell or word.

III. Charles C. Ryrie. B.A., Th. M., Th. D., Ph. D.. Litt. D., (1925-2016).

https://www.amazon.com/Charles-Caldwell-Ryrie/e/B001HMRTWW
https://www.moodypublishers.com/authors/r/charles-ryrie/https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Charles_Caldwell_Ryrie

Chapter 11 Notes

11:2-5. To encourage John the Baptist, the Lord sent a reminder of the miracles that he was doing. The OT predicted that Messiah would give sight to the blind (Isa 29:18), and there are more recorded miracles of our Lord’s doing this than any other kind. This alone should have assured John that Jesus was indeed the Messiah.

11:6. “who does not take offense at Me.” I.e., he who can in full faith acknowledge and accept My “mighty work” (vs 20) as evidence of My messiahship.

11:7-8. These are rhetorical questions expecting negative answers.

11:10. “about whom it was written.” See Isa 40:3 and Mal 3:1.

11:14. “John himself is Elijah.” Jesus is saying that if the Jews had received Him, they would also have understood that John fulfilled the OT prediction of the coming of Elijah before the Day of the Lord (Mal 4:5).. Note on 17:11-12..The sequence of thought is as follows: (1) Elijah is coming as the restorer (Mal 4:5); he came, unrecognized, in the person of John the Baptist, and was killed; (3) the Son of Man faces a like fate. The disciples seem to grasp only the first two points.

11:18-19. The people were rejecting both John’s and Jesus’s ministries even though their styles were exactly opposite. Eventually the “wisdom” of both would be justified.

11:28-30. In contrast to the teaching of the scribes, Jesus’s “yoke” is easy 

IV. Scofield Reference Bible. C. I. Scofield. D.D., 1843-1921). 

Scofield produced several major theological works. First, he wrote a book called Rightly Dividing the Word of Truth, which expresses the principles of dispensational hermeneutics. Second, his annotated reference Bible became the standard for a generation. Finally, his Bible correspondence course made his teaching readily available around the world. All three of these works are still available today. Scofield’s impact has been magnified by his influence on Lewis Sperry Chafer, who founded Dallas Theological Seminary. DTS became the most prominent dispensational seminary in the world; its many high-profile graduates include Chuck Swindoll, Tony Evans, David Jeremiah, J. Vernon McGee, Hal Lindsey, and Bruce Wilkinson.


Matthew Chapter 11 notes provided by editorial revision committee, including:

Charles L. Feinberg, Th. D., Ph. D., 1909-1995;  

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Charles_L._Feinberg

John F. Walvoord. Th. M., Th. D., 1910-2020;

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Walvoord

11:2. John is in prison; the King is rejected, and John’s faith waivers. So the Lord encourages and exhorts His servants (vv 4-6). 

11:11. “greater than he.” Positionally greater, not morally. John the Baptist was as great, in strength and character, as any man “born of women” but, as to the kingdom, his ministry was to announce that it was at hand. The kingdom did not then come, but was rejected, and John was martyred and the King subsequently crucified. The least in the kingdom (Lk 1:31;33), when it is set up in Glory will be greater than John in the fullness of the Lord’s power and glory. It is not heaven which is in question, but Messiah’s earthly kingdom (Matt 3:2).

11:12. “by force.” It has been much disputed whether the violence (force) here is external, as against the kingdom in the persons of John the Baptist and Jesus; or that considering the opposition of the scribes and Pharisees, only the violently resolute would press into it. Both things are true. The King and His herald  suffered violence, and this is the primary and greater meaning; but also, some were resolutely becoming disciples.

11:20-24. The kingdom of heaven, announced as at hand by John the Baptist, the King Himself, and by the Twelve, and attested by mighty works, has been morally rejected. The places chosen for the testing of the nation, Chorazin, Bethsaida, etc., having rejected both John and Jesus, the rejected King, now speaks of Judgment; with these cities today are just ruins, but other cities in the region are still bustling towns. “Sodom, burning.” A city located in the valley of Sidim known for its extreme wickedness and destroyed by God with fire and brimstone. Only Lot and his family survived the destruction. The official rejection was later (Mt 27:21-25). 

11:28. The new message of Jesus. The rejected King now turns from the rejecting nation and offers, not the kingdom but rest and service to all who are in conscious need of His help. It is a pivotal point in the ministry of Jesus. 

V. J. Dwight Pentecost, Th. M., Th., D. 1915=2014. pg 413 Things To Come.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/J._Dwight_Pentecost

Matthew 11:21-24

The Judgment On The Nation Israel. The Scriptures teach that the future judgment program will begin with a judgment on the nation Israel. To them, which was promised, through the covenants, a kingdom over which the Messiah, David’s son, should reign. Before this kingdom can be instituted at His personal return to the earth, there must be a judgment on Israel to determine those that will enter into this kingdom, for it is clearly revealed that “they are not all Israel which are of Israel (Romans 9:6; Zechariah 12:10-14; Zechariah 14:4; Matthew 25:1-30). 

VI. Summary.

It should be kept in mind that the Gospels of Matthew, Mark and Luke, relate to the offer of the kingdom to Israel, and not to personal salvation. The Gospel of John (John 3:16) is written to show the offer of personal salvation to all of the world, at the hands of followers of Jesus (Matthew 28:18-19; Acts 1:8). The disciples were still looking for the kingdom to come, even until the ascension of Jesus to Heaven (Acts 1:8-9), but He told them that it was not the time for such an event to occur (Acts 1:6).

VII.  My Bucket List shows the references that I consult, of theologians and printed resources, whenever I write an article that will be posted. Please find the Pages of my site to find Bucket List.

VIII. My Websites To Follow

https://equippingblog.wordpress.com/ Eternity

https://untotheleastofthese.home.blog/ Book Prep

https://newsandcommentary38395276.wordpress.com/ Thy Kingdom Come

Matthew – Chapter 10

I. Video.  Matthew Chapter 10

A. Title. Jesus Sends Out the Twelve

B. Data:  LuisetReneeandBill.

II. Dr. Thomas L.Constable., A. B., Th. M. Th. D.(Notes on Matthew)

https://faithlife.com/thomas-l-constable/about

The Synoptic Problem

http://www.godsbreathpublications.com/dr-constable-expository-bible-notes/

In 1776 and 1779, two posthumously published essays by A. E. Lessing became known, in which he argued for a single written source for the Synoptic Gospels. He called this source the Gospel of the Nazarenes, and he believed its writer had composed it in the Aramaic language. To him, one original source best explained the parallels and differences between the Synoptics. This idea of an original source or primal Gospel caught the interest of many other scholars. Some of them believed there was a written source, but others held that it was an oral source.

As one might expect, the idea of two or more sources occurred to some scholars as the best solution to the synoptic problem (e.g., H. J. Holtzmann and B. H. Streeter). Some favored the view that Mark was one of the primal sources because over 90 percent of the material in Mark also appears in Matthew and/or Luke. Some proposed another primary source, “Q,” an abbreviation of the German word for source: quelle. It supposedly contained the material in Matthew and Luke that does not appear in Mark.

Gradually, source criticism gave way to “form criticism.” The “form critics” concentrated on the process involved in transmitting what Jesus said and did to the primary sources. They assumed that the process of transmitting this information followed patterns of oral communication that are typical in primitive societies. Prominent New Testament form critics include K. L. Schmidt, Martin Dibelius, and Rudoph Bultmann. Typically, oral communication has certain characteristic effects on stories: It tends to shorten narratives, to retain names, to balance teaching, and to elaborate on stories about miracles, to name a few results.

The critics also adopted other criteria from secular philology (the study of language and languages) to assess the accuracy of statements in the Gospels. For example, they viewed as distinctive to Jesus only what was dissimilar to what Palestinian Jews or early Christians might have said. Given the critics’ view of inspiration, it is easy to see how most of them concluded that the Gospels, in their present form, do not accurately represent what Jesus said and did. However, some conservative scholars have used the same literary method but held a much higher view of the Gospel: for example, Vincent Taylor, who wrote The Gospel According to St. Mark.

III. Charles C. Ryrie. B.A., Th. M., Th. D., Ph. D.. Litt. D., (1925-2016).

https://www.amazon.com/Charles-Caldwell-Ryrie/e/B001HMRTWW
https://www.moodypublishers.com/authors/r/charles-ryrie/https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Charles_Caldwell_Ryrie

Chapter 10 Notes.

10:1. “disciples.” A disciple is one who is taught by another; he is a learner. 

10:2 . “apostles.” The word “apostle” means “one sent forth” as an ambassador who bears a message and who represents the one who sent him. The qualifications included (1) seeing the Lord and being an eyewitness of His resurrection (Acts 1;22: 1 Cor 9:1), (2) being invested with miraculous sign-gifts (Acts 5:15-16; Heb 2:3-4), and being chosen by the Lord and the Holy Spirit (vv. 1:2; Acts 1:26).

10:5-8. This “Great Commission” was limited to going to Jewish people. Not even Samaritans (mixed race of Jews and Gentiles who intermarried after the Assyrian conquest of Israel in 722 B.C.) were included, because the Jews had to prepare spiritually for the cominng messianic, earthly kingdom first. After their rejection of the King, the commission given to the same group was to go to Gentiles (28:18-19). The disciples’ ministry would be accompanied by miraculous signs (v. 8).

10:21-23. These verses are a prediction of persecution in the Tribulation before the second coming of Christ (24:9-14).

10:32-33. The restoration of Israel to the Kingdom is based on their acceptance of Jesus as God’s chosen King (Deu 17:15; Mt 23:39). Individual salvation in the Church age is based on John 3:16. Vs. 32-33 relate to the individual salvation of Jews at the end of the Tribulation (John 19:37; Zech 12:10).

IV. John F. Walvoord. A.B., M.A. Th. B., Th.M., Th. D., D.D., Litt. D. (1910-2002).

https://bible.org/users/john-f-walvoordhttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Walvoord  

https://www.thriftbooks.com/a/john-f-walvoord/203232/
(1910-2012) long-time president of Dallas Theological Seminary, was one of the most prominent evangelical scholars of his generation. He is considered perhaps the world’s foremost interpreter of biblical prophecy

The Twelve Apostles Commissioned

Twelve Apostles Named and Given Authority, 10:1-6

In connection with Christ’s commissioning the twelve disciples to preach, accompanied by power to cast out unclean spirits and to heal disease, Matthew names the twelve apostles in pairs (cf. Mk 3:16-19Lk 6:13-16Ac 1:13), unlike the other gospels, possibly indicating that they were sent forth in pairs54 (cf. Mk 6:7). There are small variations in order and in the names given to the disciples in each of the gospels. Only Matthew describes himself as a tax collector, and there are variations in the name of Lebbaeus, surnamed Thaddaeus, whom Luke calls Judas, the brother of James, to distinguish him from Judas Iscariot. Those named as apostles are commissioned and sent forth to perform a ministry on behalf of God.

Apostles Sent Only to Israel, 10:6-23

The discourse in which Christ commissions the twelve has been considered by some interpretaters as a collection of sayings spoken by Christ on many different occasions. As presented by Matthew, however, it is represented as a single discourse, and there is no valid reason for questioning this presentation. Obviously, Christ repeated many of His instructions at different times and in different places, and that there should be similarity to some statements here is not surprising.

The instruction given by Christ to the twelve was to go “to the lost sheep of the house of Israel,” and not go to the Gentiles or the Samaritans (cf. Mk 6:7-13Lk 9:1-6). His first and primary obligation was to deliver the message of the kingdom to Israel, and neither time nor personnel would permit reaching the others. Later, the gospel was to go to every creature. The apostles were given authority to perform miracles, even to raising the dead. While they seem to have been successful in casting out demons and curing all diseases, there is no record that any dead were raised at this time.

Luke records a sending out of seventy disciples, apparently subsequent to the sending of the twelve, or in addition to them (Lk 10:1). The seventy also report success in casting out demons (v. 17). Matthew does not refer to the seventy, but their instructions were similar to those given to the twelve.

In sending them forth, Jesus instructed them not to take provisions of money or clothing and to depend upon the cities in which they preached to provide for them. If they were not welcomed in a particular place, they were to shake off the dust of their feet against it and to pronounce a solemn judgment that it would be more tolerable for the land of Sodom and Gomorrah in the day of judgment than for that city.

The disciples’ task was to be a difficult one, as they would be as sheep in the midst of wolves, but their demeanor should be that of being wise as serpents and harmless as doves. They were to beware of men who might deliver them to the Sanhedrin, but if they were brought before governors and kings, they were not to be filled with care but to rely on God to enable them to speak in that hour. Jesus predicted that ultimately there would be persecution, with brother delivering brother to death, father the child, and children their parents, and they would be hated of all men. It is apparent that these prophecies go beyond their immediate experience and were to be fulfilled after Pentecost. Jesus declared they would not be able to fulfill their tasks of reaching all the cities of Israel until the Son of man had come. This seems to anticipate the second coming of Christ, and views the entire present church age as a parenthesis not taken into consideration in this prophecy.

Cost and Reward of Discipleship, 10:24-42

Continuing His instructions to the twelve, beginning in Matthew 10:24, Jesus discussed the whole matter of discipleship and its reward, including material that extended far beyond the disciples’ immediate situation. Having introduced the thought that discipleship extends until the Son of man returns, He gave instructions covering the whole period. Jesus reminded them that if He, their Master, was called Beelzebub, it is understandable that men would similarly abuse His followers. Beelzebub was the name of a god of the Philistines (2 Ki 1:2), also known as Baal, which the Jews equated with the devil, or Satan.

Jesus instructed His disciples not to fear name-calling. The time would come when truth would be fully revealed and darkness and unbelief condemned. They were not to fear those who could kill the body but not kill the soul, but rather fear the one able to destroy both soul and body in hell. Although God alone has the power of death, the reference here is to Satan, whose activities ultimately result in the destruction of both soul and body.

The disciples were assured of the care of the Father. If two sparrows were worth a farthing, or one-fourth of a cent (equal to about twenty-five cents today), and a sparrow could not fall to the ground without the Father’s permission, they could be assured that they were more valuable than many sparrows and that the very hairs of their head were numbered. Jesus promised them that if they confess Him before men, He will confess them before God the Father; but if they deny Him, they will be denied before God the Father.

Jesus told them bluntly, however, that His purpose was not to bring peace on earth, but rather a sword. A son would be set against his father, a daughter against her mother, and the daughter-in-law against her mother-in-law. A man’s foes would be those of his own household.

In stating that He had not come to bring peace among men, Jesus was referring to His first coming and the result of the proclamation of the gospel of the kingdom. He would be a divider of men. Ultimately, however, He was to bring peace and good will among men, as the angels announced at His birth (Lk 2:14). The Scriptures define many kinds of peace, such as peace with God (Ro 5:1), possessed by every Christian; the peace of God (Phil 4:7), which is a fruit of the Spirit (Gal 5:22); and the promise of peace on earth to be realized in the future millennial reign of Christ, as in Isaiah 11. The Scriptures make plain that there is no peace for the wicked (Is 57:21). Peace is only possible for those who are the recipients of the grace of God by faith.

Disciples accordingly must choose between love of Christ and of the family. Although normally, children should love their father and mother, they are not to love them more than they love Jesus. While parents should love their children, they should not love them more than they love Christ. A true disciple must take up his cross and follow after Jesus. In losing his life for Christ’s sake, he shall find it. Not only disciples, but those who receive a disciple in Christ’s name will receive their reward. Even a cup of cold water given in the name of a disciple will be rewarded in God’s time. The words of Jesus, applicable to the twelve as they went forth, have echoed down through the centuries since, and have encouraged brave men and women to be true even unto death.

V. Summary.

It is important to remember that the activity of these verses show Jesus interacting with Jews, and not Gentiles; vs 5. “Do not go in the way of the Gentiles and do not enter any city of the Samaritans”; vs. 6 “go the lost sheep of the house of Israel.” vs.  15, “judgment will be for Jews and Gentiles after the end of the Tribulation (25:31-46; 41&46; Rev 20:10, 15).

VI.  My Bucket List shows the references that I consult, of theologians and printed resources, whenever I write an article that will be posted. Please find the Pages of my site to find Bucket List.

VII. My Websites To Follow

https://equippingblog.wordpress.com/ Eternity

https://untotheleastofthese.home.blog/ Book Prep

https://newsandcommentary38395276.wordpress.com/ Thy Kingdom ComeH

Matthew – Chapter 9:18-38 (2 of 2)

I. Video.  Matthew Chapter 9 vs 18-38 

A. Title. A Dead Girl and a Sick Woman – Jesus Heals the Blind and Mute – The Workers Are Few

B. Data:  LuisetReneeandBill.

II. Thomas L. Constable., A. B., Th. M. Th. D.(Notes on Matthew).

https://faithlife.com/thomas-l-constable/aboutThe Synoptic Problem http://www.godsbreathpublications.com/dr-constables-expository-bible-notes/


All four of the Gospels are selective accounts of the life and work of Jesus Christ, whose “career was destined to change the history of the world more profoundly than that of any other single individual who ever lived.”

“The Gospels are the most important part of Holy Scripture because all that preceded them led up to them, and all that follows emerges from them. If the revelation of the Gospels were to be removed, the Old Testament would be an enigma, and the remainder of the New Testament would never have been written. These two parts of the Bible, comprising sixty-two of its sixty-six Books, derive their value from the four which we call the Gospels.”

Part of the synoptic problem is determining the sources that the Holy Spirit led the evangelists to use in producing their Gospels. There is internal evidence (within the individual Gospels themselves) that the writers used source materials as they wrote. The most obvious example of this is the Old Testament passages to which each one referred directly or indirectly.

Since Matthew and John were disciples of Jesus Christ, many of their statements represent eyewitness accounts of what happened. Likewise, Mark had close connections with Peter, and Luke was an intimate associate of Paul as well as a careful historian (Luke 1:1-4). Information that the writers obtained verbally (oral tradition) and in writing (documents) undoubtedly played a part in what they wrote. Perhaps the evangelists also received special revelations from God before and/or when they wrote their Gospels.

Some scholars have devoted much time and attention to the study of the other sources the evangelists may have used. They are the “source critics” and their work constitutes “source criticism.” Because source criticism and its development are so crucial to Gospel studies, a brief introduction to this subject follows.(in following article)/

III. Charles C. Ryrie. B.A., Th. M., Th. D., Ph. D.. Litt. D., (1925-2016).

Charles Ryrie https://www.amazon.com/Charles-Caldwell-Ryrie/e/B001HMRTWW
Charles Ryrie https://www.moodypublishers.com/authors/r/charles-ryrie/

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Charles_Caldwell_Ryrie

Chapter 9 Notes.

9:20. “the fringe of His cloak.” Probably the fringes or tassels at the corners of Christ’s mantle. These were religious reminders to the wearer to observe their commandments (Num. 15:37-39; Ryrie note (15:37-41, Like “tying a string around the finger,” the “tassels” and “cord” of blue on the edges of their garments were to remind Israel to obey God’s commands). 

Consider the following information:

Unger’s Bible Dictionary, Merrill F. Unger (Th. D., Ph. D.). page 277, dress. “Mantle or cloak,” a piece of cloth, nearly square, a sort of blanket or plaid. Moses commanded that there should be a fringe upon the four corners of this garment, together with a blue cord or ribband, to remind the people of the heavenly origin of his statutes (Matt 9:20, Lk 8:44).

The Moody Bible Commentary, Michael Vanlaningham, M. Div., Ph. D. Re 9:20. “The fringe of His cloak,” may have been the tassels that were worn on the four corners of one’s garments to remind a person of the Law (Nm 15:38-41, Dt 22:12). Re: Dt 22:12. Tassels were to be placed on the four corners of their garments, and while the explanation or reason is not stated here, it was earlier (Nm 15:37-41). The tassels were to serve as an object lesson to help the Israelites remember the Lord’s commandments wherever they went.

Tallit: What Is Tzitzit (and Tallit)?

https://www.chabad.org/library/article_cdo/aid/537949/jewish/What-Is-Tzitzit-and-Tallit.htm

Tallit: Did Yeshua (Jesus) Wear Tzitzit, the traditional Jewish Fringes?

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tallit

9:27. “Son of David.” A title that linked Jesus to the messianic line (of 1:1). 

IV. John F. Walvoord. A.B., M.A. Th. B., Th.M., Th. D., D.D., Litt. D. (1910-2002).

Bio – https://bible.org/users/john-f-walvoordhttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Walvoord  

John F. Walvoord, https://www.thriftbooks.com/a/john-f-walvoord/203232/
(1910-2012) long-time president of Dallas Theological Seminary, was one of the most prominent evangelical scholars of his generation. He is considered perhaps the world’s foremost interpreter of biblical prophecy.

The Authority Of The King To Forgive Sin (Part 2 of 2)

Two Women Healed, 9:18-26

As Jesus was discussing His answer to the question of the disciples of John, a ruler of the Jews came and, having done obeisance, petitioned Him to raise his daughter whom he declared to be already dead (cf. Mk 5:21-43Lk 8:40-56). As Jesus followed him, a woman in the crowd, afflicted with an issue of blood for twelve years, touched the hem of His garment, believing that if she could but touch His garment, she would be made well. In Mark 5:30, Christ is recorded to have asked the question, “Who touched my clothes?” In response to the question, the woman identified herself. Matthew does not include these details but records the comforting words of Christ that her faith had made her whole.

The journey to the ruler’s house continued, and upon arrival, Jesus saw the musicians who had been hired to play the dirges, as was customary when a death occurred. He told them, however, “Give place: for the maid is not dead, but sleepeth” (Mt 9:24). They responded by laughing with unbelief. Jesus, having put the people out of the house, took the maid by the hand, and she was immediately restored. Because Jesus used a word for sleeping (Gr. katheudo) not customarily used in Scripture for death, some expositors believe that she was not actually dead, but merely in a stupor.52 Most commentators, however, believe that Christ was merely declaring to them that she was sleeping, in the sense that she would soon rise. Actually, her parents were correct that she was dead. The report of the miracle was given widespread notice and added to the fame of Christ, which would have involved a degree of deception if she were not actually dead.

Healing of Two Blind Men, 9:27-31

This account, found only in Matthew, records Christ’s encounter with two blind men who followed Him, saying, “Son of David, have mercy on us” (9:27). Apparently, because Jesus did not heal them immediately, the blind men followed Him into the house. Having thus tested them, Jesus asked if they believed He was able to heal. When they replied in the affirmative, He touched their eyes saying, “According to your faith be it unto you,” and they were healed. Although He told them not to tell anyone, they nevertheless spread abroad His fame. The prohibition of revealing that they had been healed was probably due to the fact that Jesus did not want to excite followers who would come to Him simply to be healed.

Another Demoniac Healed, 9:32-35

As the blind men were leaving with their newfound sight, a man was brought in, possessed of a demon and unable to talk. This account also is found only in Matthew. Christ, according to the record, immediately healed him so that he was able to speak, and as the multitudes watched, they marveled, saying that such miracles had never happened before in Israel. The Pharisees, however, continued to be unbelieving, accusing Him of casting out demons by Satan, the prince of demons. The account of this miracle is followed by a statement summarizing Christ’s ministry of teaching and preaching, accompanied by healing all who came to Him.

Compassion of Jesus for the Multitudes, 9:36-38

Although the miracles of Christ had attracted hundreds of followers, Jesus was all too aware of their spiritual needs. Their faith was superficial, and they were like sheep without a shepherd. His compassion for them moved Him to say to His disciples that they should pray for laborers, for the harvest was great and the laborers few. The great miracles He had performed, recorded in Matthew 8-9, were not accepted by many of the Jews, and growing evidence of unbelief is found in the chapters which follow. As Kelly observes, “The Lord is utterly rejected in chapter 11. And then chapter 12 gives the final pronouncing of the judgment on that generation… The consequence is that the Lord turns from the unbelieving race and introduces the kingdom of heaven, in connection with which He gives the parables in chapter 13.”

In what sense did Jesus introduce the kingdom of heaven at this point? Obviously, He had been talking about kingdom principles all through the gospel of Matthew. The change here relates to the kingdom in its mystery form, the kingdom as it will exist between the first and second comings of Christ, in contrast to the millennial kingdom, predicted in the Old Testament and to be fulfilled after His second advent.

V. Summary.

It is important to remember that the activity of these verses show Jesus interacting with Jews, and not Gentiles.

Per the note of Charles Ryrie on 9:20, Gentiles would have known nothing about the significance of the “fringe of the cloak” of Jesus, or of its relationship to Numbers 15:37-41. Per the note of Ryrie on 9:27, neither would Gentiles have had any knowledge of  the term,”Son of David,” in relation to Jesus as Messiah. 

As the Gospel of  Matthew relates to the offer of the Kingdom to Israel, Jesus was giving the Jews a glimpse of the Kingdom, which will be on earth (Matt 6:10, “thy kingdom come…to earth”), such as in relation to healing, Matt 9:18-35. See Isaiah 35: 5-6. (Ryrie note, The Kingdom and its Blessings), “physical healings will abound.”

VI.  My Bucket List shows the references that I consult, of theologians and printed resources, whenever I write an article that will be posted. Please find the Pages of my site to find Bucket List.

VII. My Websites To Follow

https://equippingblog.wordpress.com/ Eternity

https://untotheleastofthese.home.blog/ Book Prep

https://newsandcommentary38395276.wordpress.com/ Thy Kingdom Come

Matthew Chapter 9 (9:1-9:17)

I. Video.  Matthew Chapter 9 vs 1-17 (1 of 2)

A. Title. Jesus Heals a Paralytic – The Calling of Matthew – Jesus Questioned About Fasting

B. Data:  LuisetReneeandBill.

II. Dr. Thomas L. Constable., A. B., Th. M. Th. D.

https://faithlife.com/thomas-l-constable/about

 http://www.godsbreathpublications.com/dr-constables-expository-bible-notes/

Notes On Matthew.

The Synoptic Problem.

The synoptic problem is intrinsic to all study of the Gospels, especially the first three. The word synoptic comes from two Greek words, syn and opsesthai, meaning, “to see together.” Essentially the synoptic problem involves all the difficulties that arise because of the similarities and differences between the Gospel accounts. Matthew, Mark, and Luke have received the title “Synoptic Gospels” because they present the life and ministry of Jesus Christ similarly. The content and purpose of John’s Gospel are sufficiently distinct to put it in a class by itself. It is not one of the so-called Synoptic Gospels.

III.Charles C. Ryrie. B.A.,,Th. M., Th. D., Ph. D.. Litt. D., (1925-2016).

Charles Ryrie https://www.amazon.com/Charles-Caldwell-Ryrie/e/B001HMRTWW
Charles Ryrie https://www.moodypublishers.com/authors/r/charles-ryrie/

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Charles_Caldwell_Ryrie

Chapter 9 Notes.

9:1. “your sins are forgiven.”This may indicate that the man’s sickness was the direct result of sin. Some Jews speculated that such was always the case, but see  Phil 2:30 and John 9:2

9:5. It is obviously easier to say, “Your sins are forgiven,” since the validity of the statement can not be tested so easily  as saying, “Get up.”  By making the statement, Christ was asserting a prerogative of God, who alone can forgive sins. 

9:14. “Sinners” were those whose daily occupations rendered them ceremonially unclean and not, In pharaisac eyes, to be associated with. 

9:16-17. The old and the new can not be combined. (See Lk 5:37).

IV. John F. Walvoord. A.B., M.A. Th. B., Th.M., Th. D., D.D., Litt. D. (1910-2002).

Summary.

Bio – https://bible.org/users/john-f-walvoordhttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Walvoord  

John F. Walvoord, https://www.thriftbooks.com/a/john-f-walvoord/203232/
(1910-2012) long-time president of Dallas Theological Seminary, was one of the most prominent evangelical scholars of his generation. He is considered perhaps the world’s foremost interpreter of biblical prophecy.

The Authority Of The King To Forgive Sin

Healing of the Paralyzed Man, and His forgiveness

After being rejected by the people of Gadara, Jesus returned by boat to the other side of the lake to Capernaum. There, a man, paralyzed and lying on a bed, or couch, was brought to Him (cf. Mk 2:3-12Lk 5:18-26). Recognizing the faith of his friends who had brought him, Jesus first said, “Son, be of good cheer; thy sins be forgiven thee” (Mt 9:2). This was done deliberately by Jesus, knowing the unbelief of the scribes who were watching and who, in their hearts, thought that He committed blasphemy.

Replying to the unspoken objection, Jesus posed the question as to whether it was easier to say, “Thy sins be forgiven thee,” or to say, “Arise and walk.” Obviously, merely to say either was easy. In the case of forgiveness of sins, there would be no way to demonstrate whether it had been accomplished, but to say, “Arise and walk,” would have the testimony of immediate healing. To demonstrate His power to do both, however, Jesus then said to the man, “Arise, take up thy bed, and go unto thine house” (9:6). Before them all, the man arose from his sick bed, taking up the portable couch on which he was lying, and departed as the multitude marveled. This miracle closes the second group of three, demonstrating Christ’s control over nature, the demon world, and His power both to heal disease and to forgive sin.

Call of Matthew, 9:9-17

Before introducing the third group of miracles, Matthew records briefly his own call to the ministry (cf. Mk 2:14Lk 5:27-29). In the parallel accounts in Mark and Luke, he is called Levi; but here, he refers to himself as Matthew. As an official in the tax office, he left his lucrative position in order to follow Christ. This tax office, located at Capernaum, probably had the responsibility of collecting taxes from those who were on the caravan route from Damascus to the East, which passed through Capernaum. As a tax collector, he probably knew Greek well, which qualified him for writing this gospel in the Greek language.

The incident which followed, according to Luke 5:29, was a feast, which Matthew held in his own house for Jesus. It possibly was Matthew’s way of introducing Jesus to his fellow tax collectors. To eat with publicans or tax collectors, however, was frowned upon by the Pharisees, who considered tax collectors as the enemies of their people and as those who were compromising morally. As W. H. Griffith Thomas notes, “A tax-gatherer was one who elicited intense animosity on the part of the Jews who strongly opposed this work of Roman domination.”The Pharisees, complaining to the disciples, drew from Jesus the reply, “They that [are] whole need not a physician, but they that are sick” (Mt 9:12). He then decited to them Hosea 6:6, which brings out that God prefers mercy to sacrifice, a point mentioned only by Matthew. In the process, Jesus declared, “I am not come to call the righteous, but sinners to repentance” (Mt 9:13).

Objections were also raised by the disciples of John, who, perceiving Jesus attending a feast such as this, wanted to know why the disciples of Jesus did not fast like the Pharisees. To them, Jesus replied that it is unfitting to mourn during a wedding feast, implying that this was not the time in Christ’s ministry to mourn. He prophesied, however, that the time would come when the Bridegroom would be taken away and they then could fast. In this, He anticipated His own death and ascension into heaven.

This attempt to apply the standards of the Pharisees to the new dispensation, which Jesus was introducing, was, in His words, like adding new cloth to an old garment or putting new wine into old wineskins. The Pharisees’ religion, including its fasting, was quite inadequate for what lay ahead, whether it be the dispensation of the church or the dispensation of the kingdom. As Ironside expresses it, “He had not come to add something to the legal dispensation but to supersede it with that which was entirely new… The new wine of grace was not to be poured into the skin-bottles of legality.”

V. Parting Thought.

Consider the following words from the third paragraph above. The conversation clearly is between Jesus and Jews. Gentiles would have had no knowledge of the prophecy of Hosea.

“He then decited to them Hosea 6:6, which brings out that God prefers mercy to sacrifice, a point mentioned only by Matthew. In the process, Jesus declared, “I am not come to call the righteous, but sinners to repentance” (Mt 9:13).”

VI.  My Bucket List shows the references that I consult, of theologians and printed resources, whenever I write an article that will be posted. Please find the Pages of my site to find Bucket List.

VII. My Websites To Follow

https://equippingblog.wordpress.com/ Eternity

https://untotheleastofthese.home.blog/ Book Prep

https://newsandcommentary38395276.wordpress.com/ Thy Kingdom Come

Matthew Chapter 8 (The Power Of Jesus)

I. Video.

A. Title. The Man With Leprosy – The Faith Of The Centurion. 

B. Data. luisetReneeandBill

II. Matthew Chapter 8 Notes.

A. Thomas L. Constable. AB. Th M., Th. D.

http://www.godsbreathpublications.com/dr-constables-expository-bible-notes/

8:1. Intro. This verse is transitional (cf. Matthew 5:1). Great crowds continued to follow Jesus after He delivered the Sermon on the Mount, as they had before. 

8:1 The Manifestation Of The King 8:1-11:1.

“Matthew has laid the foundational structure for his argument in chapters one through seven. The genealogy and birth have attested to the legal qualifications of the Messiah as they are stated in the Old Testament. Not only so, but in His birth great and fundamental prophecies have been fulfilled. The King, according to protocol, has a forerunner preceding Him in His appearance on the scene of Israel’s history. The moral qualities of Jesus have been authenticated by His baptism and temptation. The King Himself then commences His ministry of proclaiming the nearness of the kingdom and authenticates it with great miracles. To instruct His disciples as to the true character of righteousness which is to distinguish Him, He draws them apart on the mountain. After Matthew has recorded the Sermon on the Mount, he goes on to relate the King’s presentation to Israel (Mat_8:1 to Mat_11:1).” [Note: Toussaint, Behold the . . ., p. 121.]

8:1-34. Demonstrations of the King’s Power.

Matthew described Jesus’ ministry as consisting of teaching, preaching, and healing in Matthew 4:23. Chapters 5-7 record what He taught His disciples: principles of the kingdom. We have the essence of His preaching ministry in Matthew 4:17. Now in Matthew 8:1 to Matthew 9:34 we see His healing ministry. He demonstrated authority over human beings, unseen spiritual powers, and the world of nature. Matthew showed that Jesus’ ability proves that He is the divine Messiah. He possessed the “power to banish from the earth the consequences of sin and to control the elements of nature”. [Note: The New Scofield . . ., p. 1003.] The King authenticated His claims by performing messianic signs. In view of this the Jews should have acknowledged Him as their Messiah.

“The purpose of Matthew in these two chapters [8 and 9] is to offer the credentials of the Messiah as predicted in the Old Testament.” [Note: Walvoord, Matthew: . . ., p. 63.]

Matthew did not record Jesus’ miracles in strict chronological order. The harmonies of the Gospels make this clear. [Note: See, for example, A. T. Robertson, A Harmony of the Gospels for Students of the Life of Christ; or, for the Greek text, E. Burton and E. J. Goodspeed, A Harmony of the Synoptic Gospels in Greek.] His order is more thematic. He also selected miracles that highlight the gracious character of Jesus’ signs. As Moses’ plagues authenticated his ministry to the Israelites of his day, so Jesus’ miracles should have convinced the Israelites of His day that He was the Messiah. Moses’ plagues were primarily destructive whereas Jesus’ miracles were primarily constructive. Jesus’ miracles were more like Elisha’s than Moses’ in this respect.

Matthew recorded 10 instances of Jesus healing in this section of his book (cf. the 10 plagues in Egypt), half of all the miracles that Matthew recorded. Some regard Matthew 8:16-17 as a miracle distinct from the previous healings in chapter 8, resulting in 10 miracles. Others regard Matthew 8:16-17 as a summary of the preceding miracles, resulting in 9 miracles. Both explanations have merit since Matthew 8:16-17 records other miracles, but it does not narrate one specific miraculous healing.

Matthew presented these miracles in three groups and broke the three groups up with two discussions (narrative sections) concerning His authority. The first group of miracles involves healings (Matthew 8:1-17), the second, demonstrations of power (Matthew 8:23 to Matthew 9:8), and the third, acts of restoration (Matthew 9:18-34). Together the section presents “a slice of life” out of Jesus’ overall ministry. [Note: D. J. Weaver, Matthew’s Missionary Discourse, p. 67.]

B. Charles C. Ryrie. B.A.,,Th. M., Th. D., Ph. D.. Litt. D., (1925-2016).

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Charles_Caldwell_Ryrie

8:4. “The offering that Moses commanded.” Imagine the stunning impact on the priest, since no record exists of any Israelite being cured of leprosy except Mirian (Num 12:10-15). [Re: Lev 14:1-21; The elaborate ritual of cleansing for a leper involved two birds, one killed as a symbol of purification and the other released as a symbol of the man’s newfound freedom (vs 4-7), shaving and washing (vs 8-9), and the offering of guilt, sin, burnt, and grain offerings (vs 12, 13, 21).]

8:11. Gentiles will be included in the blessings of the millennial reign of Christ on this earth. 

8:17. “Healing illnesses.” (which are a result of sin) was a preview of His complete dealing with sin on the cross (Isa 53:4).

8:20. “Son of Man.” The title “Son of  God” is the divine Name of Jesus (v 29), “Son of David” His Jewish Name (9:27), but “Son of Man” is the name that links Him to the earth and to His mission. It was His favorite designation of Himself (used more than 80 times) and was based on Dan 7:13-14. It emphasizes (1) His lowliness and humanity (v 20), (2) His suffering and death (Lk 19:10), and (3) His future reign as King (24-27). 

8:22. Following the Lord required full commitment; therefore, let the spiritually dead bury the physically dead.

8:28. “Gaderenes.” Lived on the eastern shore of the Sea of Galilee.

8:31 The request of the demons to go into the pigs was probably to avoid being sent to the abyss. which is their ultimate doom. 

C. John F. Walvoord. A.B., M.A. Th. B., Th.M., Th. D., D.D., Litt. D. (1910-2002).

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Walvoord

The Authority of the King over Disease and Nature.

 Following the pronouncement of the principles of the kingdom in chapters 5-7, chapters 8-9 present the supporting mighty works of Jesus as credentials of the Messiah King.

Three groups of miracles may be observed. In Matthew 8:1-17, the healing of the leper (vv. 1-4), the healing of the servant (vv. 5-13), and the healing of Peter’s wife’s mother (vv. 14-15), are followed by an evening of many miraculous healings (vv. 16-17).

A second group of miracles is found in 8:23-9:8 with the stilling of the storm (vv. 23-27), the casting out of demons (vv. 28-34), and the healing of the paralytic and the forgiveness of his sins (9:1-8).

The third group of miracles is found in 9:18-38 with the healing of the ruler’s daughter (vv. 18-19, 23-26), the healing of the woman with the issue of blood (vv. 20-22), the healing of two blind men (vv. 27-31), the healing of the demoniac (vv. 32-34), followed by a general statement of many instances of healing (v. 35).

In between these accounts of miracles, which are not necessarily in chronological order, are other instances of significant events which took place in Christ’s ministry. The purpose of Matthew in these two chapters is to offer the credentials of the Messiah as predicted in the Old Testament. The order of the presentation deals with Christ’s power over disease in the first group; His power over nature, demons, and authority to forgive sins in the second group; with His power over death and other miscellaneous human needs in the third group. In 8:17, the whole picture is related to Isaiah’s prophecy of a suffering Messiah who would bear the sickness and the sins of Israel.

Leper Healed, 8:1-4

Coming down from the mountain with great multitudes following Him, Jesus was confronted suddenly by a leper (cf. Mk 1:40-45Lk 5:12-14). The crowd undoubtedly surrounded the leper at a safe distance, afraid of his terrible disease. The leper addressed Jesus, “Lord, if thou wilt, thou canst make me clean” (Mt 8:2). This is the first instance in Matthew where Christ is addressed as Lord (Gr. kyrios). The word means “master,” but as used of Jesus, it is a recognition of His authority and deity. The leper had confidence in the power of Jesus; he was not sure whether Jesus was willing to heal.

Jesus first touched the leper, which amazed the crowd, for lepers were not touched (cf. Lev 13). With this loving gesture, Jesus said, “I will,” and immediately the leper was healed. The leper was instructed not to tell anyone but to go to the priest, fulfilling the procedure of Leviticus 14 in regard to the cleansing of a leper. Commentators like Wrede and R. H. Lightfoot have strained at the command not to tell others and questioned the purpose of going to the priest. The command not to tell others was probably to avoid gathering ever greater crowds, which by their size were getting out of hand, as Tasker has observed. The command to tell the priest was first of all an act of obedience to the law, but Jesus probably wanted to have a genuine case of healing certified in a formal way. Telling the priests would not increase the problem of the large crowds and did not contradict Christ’s instructions to “tell no man.” The effect on the priests must have been electrifying, as they had never before in their memory had a leper healed. Significantly, in Acts, many of the priests are recorded to have believed in Jesus.

Centurion’s Servant Healed, 8:5-13

As Jesus was entering into Capernaum, a centurion, a Roman soldier, besought Him to heal a servant, sick with palsy and in great suffering (cf. Lk 7:1-10). The servant is called in Greek, a pais, meaning a child, but the word is sometimes used of adult servants. Jesus immediately responded to the centurion with a promise that He would come and heal him. In reply, the centurion declared himself unworthy for Jesus to come into his house, and besought Him to speak the word only, saying that he too was a man in authority who could command and have instant obedience. Jesus marveled at his faith, greater than any He had found in Israel, and commented that in the future kingdom, the children of the kingdom would be cast out and others, that is, Gentiles, would be admitted instead. Jesus then brought the encounter to a close, saying to the centurion, “Go thy way; and as thou hast believed, so be it done unto thee. And his servant was healed in the selfsame hour” (Mt 8:13).

Healing of Peter’s Mother-in-law, 8:14-15

In Capernaum, Jesus went to Peter’s house, which was located there, and finding his wife’s mother sick of fever, He healed her. Then she rose and ministered to them (cf. Mk 1:29-31Lk 4:38-39). The best texts indicate that she ministered to Him (singular) rather than to “them,” although she probably ministered to the others also. In healing first the leper—an outcast—then a Gentile centurion, and finally a woman, Jesus was dealing with those either excluded or unimportant in Jewish thinking. As Morgan expresses it, “He began with the unfit persons for whom there was no provision in the economy of the nation. Jesus was uncontaminated by contact with leprosy and disease, and He was not bound by Jewish narrowness from those whom the world despised.

Evening of Healing, 8:16-17

Matthew brings to a close this group of miracles by stating that that evening, many afflicted with demons and all others who were sick were healed, in fulfillment of Isaiah 53:4-5 (cf. Mk 1:32-34Lk 4:40-41). Matthew, having made his point that Jesus fulfilled the Old Testament prophecies of these miraculous works, is content to summarize many incidents in one short statement.

Price of Discipleship, 8:18-22

Two instances of would-be followers of Jesus are mentioned, typical of the multitude, attracted by the miracles, who wanted to be disciples (cf. Lk 9:57-62). The first to be introduced is a scribe who promised to follow Jesus wherever He went. Jesus replied by pointing out that while foxes have dens and birds have nests, the Son of man did not have a home. Following Jesus would be difficult. Another person is described in Matthew 8:21-22 as desiring to follow Jesus but wanting first to bury his father. Evidently, he meant that he wanted to live with his father until he died. Jesus replied by showing the priority of His claims.

Jesus Stills the Storm, 8:23-27

Beginning a second group of miracles, the account is given of the stilling of the storm on Galilee, also given in Mark 4:35-41 and Luke 8:22-25. While Jesus and the disciples were in the boat on Galilee, a sudden storm overtook them and was filling the boat with water, while Jesus Himself was asleep. The disciples awoke Him with the urgent petition, literally translated, “Lord, save, we are perishing.” Jesus, thus awakened, first rebuked them for being fearful and of little faith; then, He rebuked the winds and the sea, and suddenly there was a great calm. The disciples, accustomed to miracles, were amazed at the suddenness of the change and the evidence of the power of Christ, and, speaking in awe, said, “Even the winds and the sea obey him.”

Healing of Two Demoniacs, 8:28-34

After the instance of stilling the storm on Galilee, as they arrived on the other side of the lake, they were met by two men who were demon possessed and lived in a graveyard, which, because of their presence, was considered so dangerous that others avoided passing that way (cf. Mk 5:1-21Lk 8:26-40). The demons, speaking through the men, recognized Jesus as the Son of God, and expressed the fear that He had come to torment them before their time. The King James translation “devils” is better rendered “demons” and refers to fallen angels who are Satan’s agents. Their ultimate judgment is assured and is apparently simultaneous with Satan being cast into the lake of fire (Rev 20:10).

As an alternative to being cast out completely, the demons requested permission to enter the herd of swine feeding nearby. Jesus gave the simple, abrupt command, “Go.” The demons, entering the herd of swine, caused them to run violently down a steep cliff into the sea, where they perished. The demons’ foolish request demonstrated their limited knowledge, as they were just as much cast out after the swine perished as if they had been cast out of the demoniac without entering any other being.

The report of the keepers of the swine brought out the whole city of Gadara, about six miles from Galilee, a preferred reading to Gergesenes, a town some thirty miles south and east of Galilee. When the people of the town saw Jesus, they urged Him to leave their country. Keeping swine was, of course, forbidden to Israel, and their destruction was a justifiable judgment from God, which should have shown the people their spiritual need. Their choice of swine, rather than Christ, dramatically illustrated their blindness. They preferred pigs and money to Christ and spiritual riches. As the next chapter reveals (Mt 9:1), Jesus obliged them and left. The creature is able to reject the Creator in time, but will render account in eternity for his lost opportunity.

While Matthew does not record it, in the parallel account in Mark 5:1-20, the man delivered from demons is instructed to go to his home and testify to his friends, the only instance where Jesus told one healed to testify to his own people (cf. vv. 19-20).

III. Parting Thoughts. As, in the preceding chapters of Matthew, it is important to know that the context is of Jesus speaking with Jews, with the purpose of Jesus to let Jews know that He is God’s chosen King for the upcoming Davidic Kingdom of Israel (Deu 17:14-15, 2 Sam 7:8-17).

8:4. “go show yourself to the priest and present the offering that Moses commanded, as a testimony to them.” The account of this verse would have no understanding by Gentiles., only to Jews.

8:27. “even the winds and sea obey Him.” From vs 18-27, the context is that of Jesus having control over all of God’s creation, even all nature. The disciples will be going out into the world to tell of Jesus. They will have been first hand eye witnesses of the miracles that Jesus performed. In verse 27, the context is of Jesus having power over nature. The context is “not” that of a person’s life that may have good times, bad times, and in between times. When the disciples go into “all nations” (Matt 28:19) they will encounter many people who are pagan or atheist; the disciples will need every bit of the teachings of Jesus to make known to them the love, strength and saving power of Jesus. 

IV. My Bucket List shows the references that I consult, of theologians and printed resources, whenever I write an article that will be posted. Please find the Pages of my site to find Bucket List.

V. My Websites To Follow.

https://equippingblog.wordpress.com/ Eternity

https://untotheleastofthese.home.blog/ Book Prep

https://newsandcommentary38395276.wordpress.com/ Thy Kingdom Come

Matthew 7 (The Practice Of Kingdom Life II)

I. Video. 

Title. Matthew- Chapter 7. Data:  LuisetReneeandBill.

II. Introduction. Scofield Reference Notes. – Devils – Matthew 7:22

Devils, lit demons. To the reality and personality of demons the N.T. scriptures bear abundant testimony. As to their origin nothing is clearly revealed, but they are not to be confounded with the angels mentioned in 2 Peter 2:4Jude 1:6.

Summary: Demons are spirits Matthew 12:43Matthew 12:45 are Satan’s emissaries ; Matthew 12:26Matthew 12:27Matthew 25:41 and so numerous as to make Satan’s power practically ubiquitous. Mark 5:9. They are capable of entering and controlling both men and beasts Mark 5:8Mark 5:11-13 and earnestly seek embodiment, without which, apparently, they are powerless for evil. ; Matthew 12:43Matthew 12:44Mark 5:10-12. Demon influence and demon possession are discriminated in the N. T. Instances of the latter are ; Matthew 4:24Matthew 8:16Matthew 8:28Matthew 8:33Matthew 9:32Matthew 12:22Mark 1:32Mark 5:15Mark 5:16Mark 5:18Luke 8:35Acts 8:7Acts 16:16. They are unclean, sullen, violent, and malicious ; Matthew 8:28Matthew 9:23Matthew 10:1Matthew 12:43Mark 1:23Mark 5:3-5Mark 9:17Mark 9:20Luke 6:18Luke 9:39. They know Jesus Christ as Most High God, and recognize His supreme authority ; Matthew 8:31Matthew 8:32Mark 1:24Acts 19:15James 2:19. They know their eternal fate to be one of torment ; Matthew 8:29Luke 8:31. They inflict physical maladies ; Matthew 12:22Matthew 17:15-18Luke 13:16 but mental disease is to be distinguished from the disorder of mind due to demonical control. Demon influence may manifest itself in religion asceticism and formalism 1 Timothy 4:1-3 degenerating into uncleanness 2 Peter 2:10-12. The sign of demon influence in religion is departing from the faith, i.e. the body of revealed truth in the Scriptures. 1 Timothy 4:1. The demons maintain especially a conflict with believers who would be spiritual. ; Ephesians 6:121 Timothy 4:1-3. All unbelievers are open to demon possession Ephesians 2:2. The believer’s resources, prayer and bodily control Matthew 17:21 “the whole armour of God” Ephesians 6:13-18. Exorcism in the name of Jesus Christ Acts 16:18 was practised for demon possession. One of the awful features of the apocalyptic judgments in which this age will end is an irruption of demons out the abyss. Revelation 9:1-11.

III. Ryrie Study Bible Notes.

7:1-5. “Do not judge.” This does not mean that one is never, in any sense or to any extent, to judge another, for verse 5 indicates that when one’s own life is pure he should “take the speck out” of the brother’s eye. It does mean, however, that a follower of Christ is not not to be contentious.

7:6. The disciples were expected to make moral distinctions and not allow those who reject the invitation of Christ to treat precious things as cheap. “dogs….swine.” Both animals were despised, and represent unholy people.

7:12. The well-known golden rule. It was also taught by the great Jewish rabbis; such as Rabbi Hillel.

7:11-29. In these verses, notice the two ways (vv 13-14), two trees (vv -15-20), two professions (vv 21-23). and two builders (vv 24-29). The “two ways” was a common teaching method in Judaism and Greco-Roman philosophy,

7:21. Obedience to the will of God comes first.

7:29. The scribes had to rely on tradition for authority; Christ’s authority was His own. It disturbed the Pharisees that He had not “credentials” as any official teacher in their system.

IV. Summary. Walvoord Notes. Doing the Will of the Father.

Judging Others, 7,1-6

The final chapter recording the Sermon on the Mount contrasts the true and false way, that is, doing the will of the Father or not doing the will of the Father.

Morgan calls this chapter “a summary of principles of action.” The chapter begins by forbidding hypocritical judgment of others. Those desiring to judge their fellow men are warned that as they judge so they will also be judged. Too often, the one judging, who is able to see a mote or a small speck in his brother’s eye, overlooks the fact that he has a beam, or a splinter in his own eye, which is much larger. Such judgment is hypocrisy, and Jesus declared one should first cast out the beam from his own eye in order to be able to see clearly to help his brother. However, in helping others, care should be exercised to do that which will be really appreciated and helpful. Something holy should not be cast to dogs because they would not appreciate it; and pearls would only be trampled under the feet of swine, and they might turn and injure their benefactor. Help to others should be thoughtful and deliberate.

Encouragement to Pray, 7:7-11

Earlier, Jesus had given them a model prayer. Now assurance was given that God welcomes prayer. They were, accordingly, exhorted to ask, seek, and knock, with the assurance that those who ask, receive; those who seek, find; and those who knock shall find the door open. As Tasker points out, the force of the present imperative in these commands is iterative: the petitioner should be persistent, keep on asking, seeking, knocking. If a son asks bread, would a father give him a stone? Or if he should ask for fish, would he receive a poisonous serpent? In like manner, if men, who naturally are evil, can give good gifts to their children, how much more can God the Father in heaven, who is infinite in His goodness, give good things to them that ask Him? In the kingdom, there is the reassuring fact that God the Father cares for those who are His.

Golden Rule, 7:12

The moral principles outlined in the Sermon of the Mount are summarized Matthew 7:12 in what is often called the golden rule, which has no exact parallel anywhere else in literature. The principle is laid down that what men would ordinarily want others to do to them, so they should do to others, and this rule is the sum of the law and the prophets. As Morgan expresses it, “That is the whole thing.” Morgan goes on to quote Hillel, Socrates, Aristotle, and Confucius as expressing similar sentiments, but concludes, “These are negative and passive; Christ’s comment is positive and active.”

Two Ways, 7:13-14

Entering into the kingdom is likened to going through a narrow gate, in contrast to going through the gate which is wide and broad, leading to destruction. Jesus gave no assurance that the majority will enter the kingdom; He declared that few find the gate leading to life and righteousness. There have been many attempts to soften this hard fact, to deny that few are saved, and to affirm that all will eventually be reconciled to God. There is no justification for ignoring these plain words of Christ. 

True and False Teachers, 7:15-20

Jesus warned against false prophets who are like wolves clad in sheep’s clothing, preying upon the flock. Tasker holds that false teachers are part of the cause for the way being narrow and hard to find. False prophets can be known by their fruit. Just as a good tree brings forth good fruit and a bad tree brings forth bad fruit, so it is with prophets. In the orchard, trees that do not bear good fruit are cast into the fire, and disciples of Jesus can expect God, in His time, to deal with those that are false.

True and False Profession, 7:21-23

Not only are there false prophets but there is false profession on the part of some who claim to follow Jesus. Not every one who addresses Him as Lord will enter into the kingdom of heaven, even if they have prophesied in the name of Christ and have cast out demons and have performed wonderful works. The ultimate test is whether they are obedient to the Father and characteristically do His will. This principle does not mean that salvation in the kingdom is secured by works, but it does teach that works are the fruit, or evidence, which are found in a true disciple.

True and False Foundations, 7:24-29

The Sermon on the Mount concludes with a parable. Those who hear and respond in obedience to the sayings of Jesus were declared to be like a wise man building his house upon a rock. The storms which beat and the rains which came did not destroy the house because of its solid foundation. The foolish man, however, who built his house upon the sand, in time of storm, discovered that his house would fall, because he had not built upon that which is eternal and true. As Ironside points out, Christ is the rock, the only sure foundation (Is 28:161 Co 3:111 Pe 2:6-8).

This masterful address, comprehensive and authoritative in its pronouncement, astonished the people. As Ironside expresses it, “Never had such words as these been heard in Israel.” The teaching of Christ was in great contrast to the way the scribes taught and clearly showed that this was the truth of God.

The expression “and it came to pass” (Mt 7:28) is a characteristic transitional expression of Matthew (cf. 9:10; 11:1; 13:53; 19:1; 26:1). A similar expression is found much more frequently, however, in Luke and Acts than it is in Matthew, but it serves to introduce a summary of the reactions to what Jesus said and did.

V. Parting Thoughts. Matthew Chapter 7.

It is important to notice that the entire narrative is Jewish, as Jesus was speaking with Jews, and only Jews. Vs 7 shows conditions of the Godly  Kingdom Age, which Isaiah prophesied (Isa 2:1-11; 9:6b-7; 11:1-12; 65:20-25). The last days (Isa 2:2), relate to the last days of Israel, which are the Tribulation and Millennium. The last days of the church are discussed in 1 Tim 4:1-3, and are the days prior to the catching up of the church (1 Thes 4:13-18). Gentiles had no knowledge of the Law,or the prophets, which shows that the conversation in Matt 7 was Jewish.  Verse 7:21 relates to Jews at the end of the Tribulation, when they will have the opportunity to accept Jesus as God’s chosen king (Deu 17:14-15), or be refused entry into the Kingdom Age, (Matt 23:39, Luke 23:34-35; Zech 12:2-14:1-9; Matt 24:29-3). Vs 31 is not the rapture, but of God regathering the elect (Jews) to Israel. At the end of the Tribulation, unsaved Jews and Gentiles, who are still alive, will be taken in death to the Great White Throne Judgment (Matt 24:40-41; Jews taken in judgment to the Great White Throne Judgment, in death, or left behind for the kingdom) (Matt 25:31-34, 41, 45-46, Gentiles left for the Kingdom, or taken in death to the Great White Throne Judgement, and cast into the Lake of Fire, as will Jews (Rev 20:11-15).  By accepting Jesus as God’s chosen king, living Jews show belief in Jesus as Messiah.  Jesus told the disciples that they must believe in Him as Savior (John 3:16), in order to have eternal life. The Apostle Paul made the same statement to the Philippian jailer the in Acts 16:31.  Jesus told His disciples that eternal life begins at the time of belief (John 17:3), and that once we have come to belief in Christ, we can not be “unsaved,” per John 10:27-30).  In the discussion that Jesus had with Nicodemus in John 3:3, Jesus said that unless we are born again, we can not see the Kingdom of God. Once we are born again, we can not be “unborn;” at that time we have the Spirit of Father, Son, and Holy Spirit dwelling within our spirit; no one can force God’s Spirit from within us (John 12:8-11). By having God’s Holy Spirit dwelling within our spirit, we are constantly taught the things of righteousness (John 15:26; 16:7-11).  Nobody but God puts His Spirit within our spirit, therefore, no one, including ourselves, can make God’s Spirit flee from us. In Matthew 7:21, for Jews to do with the will of God is to accept Jesus as God’s chosen king (Deu 17:14-15; Isa 7:14; 9:6b-7; John 14:7-11). Mt 7:21-23 does not relate to those of us who are saved. We don’t beg to get into Heaven; by belief in Christ we are guaranteed such entry. To believe in Jesus is to be born again (John 3:3-8, 16-18).

VI. My Bucket List shows the references that I consult, of theologians and printed resources, whenever I write an article that will be posted. Please find the Pages of my site to find Bucket List.

VII. My Websites To Follow.

https://equippingblog.wordpress.com/ Eternity

https://untotheleastofthese.home.blog/ Book Prep

https://newsandcommentary38395276.wordpress.com/ Thy Kingdom Come

Matthew 6 (The Practice Of Kingdom Life)

I. Video. 

A. Title. Matthew Chapter 6

B. Data. LuisetReneeandBill

II. Introduction. The Kingdom (Scofield Reference Notes). 

The kingdom of God is to be distinguished from the kingdom of heaven, in five respects:

(1) The kingdom of God is universal, including all moral intelligences willingly subject to the will of God, whether angels, the Church, or saints of past or future dispensations Luke 13:28Luke 13:29Hebrews 12:22Hebrews 12:23 while the kingdom of heaven is Messianic, mediatorial, and Davidic, and has for its object the establishment of the kingdom of God in the earth (See Scofield “Hebrews 12:23- :“) 1 Corinthians 15:241 Corinthians 15:25.

(2) The kingdom of God is entered only by the new birth John 3:3John 3:5-7 the kingdom of heaven, during this age, is the sphere of a profession which may be real or false. (See Scofield “John 3:5-43.3.7- :“) Matthew 25:1Matthew 25:11Matthew 25:12

(3) Since the kingdom of heaven is the earthly sphere of the universal kingdom of God, the two have almost all things in common. For this reason many parables and other teachings are spoken of the kingdom of heaven in Matthew, and of the kingdom of God in Mark and Luke. It is the omissions which are significant. The parables of the wheat and tares, and of the net Matthew 13:24-30Matthew 13:36-43Matthew 13:47-50 are not spoken of the kingdom of God. In that kingdom there are neither tares nor bad fish. But the parable of the leaven Matthew 13:33 is spoken of the kingdom of God also, for, alas, even the true doctrines of the kingdom are leavened with the errors of which the Pharisees, Sadducees, and the Herodians were the representatives. (See Scofield “Matthew 13:33- :“) .

(4) The kingdom of God “comes not with outward show” Luke 17:20 but is chiefly that which is inward and spiritual Romans 14:17 while the kingdom of heaven is organic, and is to be manifested in glory on the earth. (See “Kingdom (O.T.),” Zechariah 12:8Zechariah 12:8 note; (N.T.), ; Luke 1:31-331 Corinthians 15:241 Corinthians 15:24 note; Matthew 17:2Matthew 17:2 note.) (See Scofield “Matthew 17:2- :“) , Luke 1:31-33 See Scofield “Luke 1:31-42.1.33- :” See Scofield “Luke 1:31-42.1.33- :

(5) The kingdom of heaven merges into the kingdom of God when Christ, having put all enemies under his feet, “shall have delivered up the kingdom to God, even the Father” 1 Corinthians 15:24-28 (See Scofield “1 Corinthians 15:24

III. Ryrie Study Bible Notes.

6:1-18. Christ discusses three pharisaic practices of piety; almsgiving, prayer, and fasting.

6:4. “that your giving be in secret.” Jewish tradition said that there was in the temple a “chamber of secrets” into which the devout used to put their gifts in secret so that the poor could receive “therefrom” in secret.

6:9: “Pray…in this way.” The Lord’s prayer is a model for our prayers. It begins with adoration of God ( v 9), acknowledges subjection to His will (v 10), asks petitions of Him (vv 11-13a), and ends with an ascription of praise (v 13b).

6:11. “bread.” All necessary food. 

6:12. “debts.” These are obligations incurred; i.e. ,sins of omission and commission. Forgiveness means “cancellation of these debts or obligations.”

6:14.-15. Notice that the only point the Lord emphasizes in the prayer is the necessity for forgiving one another. Forgiveness with the Father depends on forgiveness among the members of the family of God. This is the forgiveness that affects fellowship within the family of God, not the forgiveness that leads to salvation.

6:16-18. “neglect their appearance.” Pharisees wanted everyone to know they were fasting, so they did not wash or trim their hair, and sometimes put ashes on their heads.

6:23. When our spiritual eyes are clouded by greed, there is nothing  but darkness.

6:25. “your heavenly Father feeds them.” God feeds the birds not only by miraculous supply of food but through natural processes involving the earth and the birds use of their faculties. Likewise, the child of God, though sometimes the recipient of a miracle, is usually cared for by normal means.

6:27. “add a single hour to his life.” Worry can not add to one’s life span; indeed, it can shorten it. 

6:28: “lilies.” Various flowers.

6:34. “trouble.” Let each day’s trouble be enough for that day. This saying is like a proverb. 

IV. Walvoord Commentary Comments.

The Life Of Faith In The Kingdom

In contrast to chapter 5, dealing mostly with moral issues, chapter 6 delineates the life of faith. Important in this life of faith are four main elements: (1) performing alms in secret and trusting God for open reward (vv. 1-4); (2) praying in secret and trusting God for open reward (vv. 5-18); (3) laying up treasures in heaven rather than on earth (vv. 19-24); (4) seeking the kingdom of God today and trusting God for His supply tomorrow (vv. 25-34).

Giving Alms (6:1-4)

In the opening four verses, Jesus called attention to the ostentatious almsgiving which often characterized Jewry. In the kingdom, alms should be given secretly, but God would reward openly. The reference in verse 1 to “your Father which is in heaven” (cf. also 6:4) is one of seventeen references to God as Father in the Sermon on the Mount, and as Pettingill notes, this “must surely have sounded strange to Jewish ears,” accustomed to thinking of God “as The Great and Dreadful God.”

Instructions Concerning Prayer (6:5-18).

In like manner, instead of praying publicly in the synagogue and on the corners of the street, as was customary for the Pharisees, they were exhorted to pray in secret, trusting God to answer their prayers openly. Likewise, their prayers were not to be repetitious, as if repetition gained merit, but instead they were to pray simply.

As an illustration, in verse 9, He gave them a sample prayer often called the Lord’s Prayer. It is more properly, however, the disciples’ prayer, that is, a prayer for beginners. As Ironside points out, “Jesus Himself could not pray it, for it includes a request for forgiveness of sins, and He was ever the Sinless One. There is no indication that this prayer ever was repeated from memory in the early church or considered a part of its ritual. The same prayer, found in , has minor variations and additions, including the closing clause in Matt 6:13, which is not found in the more ancient manuscripts. According to Jesus, prayers should be addressed to God as the Father who is in heaven, thereby recognizing the disciples’ relationship to God as His children. Worship of God is the essence of prayer, and the first petition is that God’s name be hallowed or revered. In keeping with the context, the next petition is “Thy kingdom come,” certainly including the future millennial kingdom but broad enough to include the contemporary spiritual kingdom. This is followed by that which would be in keeping with the kingdom, that is, that God’s will should be done in earth as it is in heaven. The first three petitions are all aorist imperatives in the Greek text, pointed commandments to be fulfilled in full.

In verse 11, the petitions are changed to the first person, relating to human need. Included in the prayer was the petition for daily bread, representing all necessary temporal needs. Second, forgiveness is sought, assuming that the petitioner also forgives, although the reverse order is observed in the epistles; that is, we should forgive because we are already forgiven. In the family relationship, the other aspect is also true. The Christian already forgiven judicially should not expect restoration in the family relationship unless he, himself, is forgiving. Verse 12 does not deal with salvation but the relationship of a child to his father. This is followed by the petition not to be led into temptation, that is, into unnecessary enticement into sin, but rather to be delivered both from evil temptation and succumbing to it. The King James Version includes the doxology that to God belonged the kingdom, the power, and the glory forever, certainly proper ascriptions, whether included in the original text or not.

In the verses which follow, further exhortation is given concerning the necessity of forgiveness in human relationships if we expect God the Father to forgive us. Again, this must not be interpreted as relating to the issue of personal salvation but rather to proper fellowship between the child and his father.

Contriteness of heart, however, should not be a matter of outward appearance which Jesus attributed to hypocrites, or those who are merely acting sad and who disfigure their outer appearance to indicate that they are fasting. Rather He exhorted them that if they want to fast, they should hide this from men by anointing their head and washing their face and doing their fasting in secret that God may reward them openly. The life of faith depends upon God and not men for recompense. Fasting today is neither commanded nor forbidden, and is beneficial only if practiced under the guidance of the Holy Spirit.Treasures in Heaven, 6:19-24

Important in Jewish thinking was material wealth. In His public ministry, Jesus repeatedly rebuked them for the prominence they gave to material wealth. A true subject of the kingdom, Jesus said, would lay up his treasures in heaven, where they would be impervious to the moth which would eat his beautiful silk fabrics, the rust that would corrupt his jewelry, and would be beyond the grasping fingers of thieves. The principle involved was that their heart would be where their treasure was. If their eyes were in an evil way coveting money and wealth, their whole body would be full of darkness, but if penetrated by the revealing light of eternal values, their whole body would be full of light.

The contrast between the darkness of covetousness and the light of faith and treasure in heaven carries over to the concept of two masters. Necessarily a choice must be made, and they must either regard a master with love and obedience or with hate and disobedience. So, similarly, a choice must be made between God and mammon, or money. As Tasker notes, “Men cannot serve (i.e. ‘be slaves of’) God and mammon (Knox ‘money’) at once, for single ownership and full-time service are of the essence of slavery.”In the kingdom, they must live for God and not for material gain, and in committing their treasures to heaven, they would put their trust in the God of heaven.

Cure For Anxiety  (6:25-34).

The place of material gain in life carries over into the problem of anxious care. Because they could trust God for time as well as eternity, they were not to spend their time worrying about their provision of food and drink and raiment for the body. Like the fowl of the air, they were to trust divine provision; and like the lilies of the field, God would care for them. The argument was advanced that if God can care for the grass of the field, existing only for a day and then used for fuel for the oven, how much more will He clothe and care for those who are the objects of His great salvation? Although concern for earthly things characterized the unbelieving Gentile world, Christ reminded them that their Father knows their needs and that they should seek first His kingdom and His righteousness, and that God would add the necessary temporal things to them. The chapter concludes, accordingly, on the note that they should not have anxious care about tomorrow but rather concern themselves with serving God today.

VI. Parting thoughts.

As proof that Jesus didn’t bring the Kingdom to earth with his first advent, Matt 6:10 records Jesus instructing his disciples (Jews) to pray for the Kingdom to come to earth. For followers of Christ in this dispensation of Grace (Church), we don’t pray for the Kingdom to come, we pray for unbelievers to come to belief in Jesus (Acts 16:30-31). In this chapter of the Gospel of Matthew, Jesus is telling the Jews what life will be like in the Kingdom (on earth). 

VII. My Bucket List shows the references that I consult, of theologians and printed resources, whenever I write an article that will be posted. Please the Pages of my site to find Bucket List.

VIII. My Websites To Follow.


https://equippingblog.wordpress.com/
 Eternity

https://untotheleastofthese.home.blog/ Book Prep

https://newsandcommentary38395276.wordpress.com/ Thy Kingdom Come

Matthew 5:17-48 (Laws and Principles of the Kingdom)

I. Video..

A. Title. Jesus: Sermon On The Mount.

B. Data. Jesus Film.

II. Introduction. (Mathew Chapter 5). Dr. John F. Walvoord (A.B., M.A., Th. B., Th. M., Th. D., D.D., Litt. D., 1910-2002). The laws and principles of the Kingdom.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Walvoord

 In Matthew 5:17-48, the details of the moral principles of the kingdom are outlined, and the following subjects are mentioned: the relation of the law of the kingdom to the Mosaic law and the prophets (vv. 17-19); the righteousness of the kingdom as compared to the righteousness of the scribes and Pharisees (vv. 20-32); laws relating to perjury (vv. 33-37); laws relating to injustice and unfair advantage (vv. 38-42); and laws relating to enemies (vv. 43-48).

In introducing the laws of the kingdom, Jesus paid full respect to the Mosaic law. He declared that He had not come to destroy it or replace it, but to fulfill it. Although the Mosaic law, as a dispensation, was to end at the cross, its moral and spiritual implications were to be fulfilled in later dispensations, including the kingdom. While it is not accurate to say that the kingdom period, when Christ reigns on earth, will be under the Mosaic law, any more than the present age of grace is, it is obvious that the future kingdom is more legal in its government as directed by an absolute Ruler, who rules with a rod of iron (Rev 19:15). Jesus called, however, for a righteousness which would exceed that of the scribes and Pharisees. The scribes and Pharisees were attempting to fulfill the letter of the law, but were actually breaking the spirit of the law. They not only fell far short of the Mosaic law but fell even shorter of the law of the kingdom. Just as Jesus was to fulfill the law Himself, so His disciples also would share in the fulfillment of the law of righteousness.

According to Jesus, not one jot, that is, the smallest Hebrew letter, yod, or one tittle, that is, the smallest part of a letter that would change the meaning, would be left unfulfilled. Clearly, Jesus upheld the inerrancy of the Scriptures in their entirety, not simply their moral sense. The kingdom rule which He was presenting had the highest moral standards, and His disciples were expected to obey.

The morality of the kingdom, in many respects, was to exceed that of the Law of Moses. Beginning with Matthew 5:21, He brought up case after case where morality in the kingdom is more precise and exacting than their customary interpretation of the Mosaic law. Whereas Moses said they should not commit murder, in the kingdom it was wrong to be angry with a brother without cause. One who called his brother Raca, or “empty headed” (i.e., a numbskull), would be in danger of the Sanhedrin. Even worse would be to call him a fool, which would place him in danger of eternal punishment, literally, the fire of Gehenna. While this does not necessarily mean that a person who carelessly calls another a fool today is in danger of hell, it involves an attitude of superior wisdom which does not take into consideration the sinful state of everyone who is saved. The order of reference in verse 22 is climactic, but all is contrasted to murder in verse 21.

In keeping with this, if one would bring a gift to the altar of God and would there remember that he had something against a brother, Jesus exhorted him to leave the gift in order to be reconciled to his brother and then to return to offer the gift. The series of exhortations, beginning in verse 20, is addressed to the second person, making it direct exhortation.

Expanding the problem of reconciliation to a brother, in verses 25 and 26, He took up the matter of an honest debt which must be cared for, lest the debtor be hauled into court and imprisoned until the last farthing is paid. The adversary of verse 25 is certainly not the devil, as Morgan suggests, but an ordinary human creditor. The point is that God demands perfect righteousness and what we owe a brother, we owe God.

Proceeding from matters which offend a brother, or debts which are owed a brother, He then took up the matter of adultery and lust and its relationship to divorce. In contrast to the law which forbade adultery, Jesus charged that anyone looking on a woman in lust had already committed adultery. He charged them that if their right eye offend, they should pluck it out, or if their right hand offend, it should be cut off. There is no scriptural support that Jesus meant that lust would be conquered by doing this literally, as there still would be the left eye and the left hand, but rather that the severity of the sin required severe self-judgment. If the choice were to lose a member or to be cast into the eternal damnation of Gehenna, obviously it would be better to be maimed.

With this as a background, He contrasted divorce in the kingdom to divorce in the Mosaic law. In the Old Testament, it was comparatively easy to secure divorce. According to Deuteronomy 24:1, a woman no longer in favor with her husband could be given a bill of divorcement and sent away. If in the meantime, however, she married another, she was under no circumstances to return to her first husband, indicating that the divorce was real and final. In the kingdom, the only justifiable cause is that of fornication, or unfaithfulness. Although the matter of divorce in the teaching of Jesus is subject to various interpretations, the tenor of this passage is to recognize divorce as real and final when there is fornication after the marriage relationship has been established. This was more strict than the Mosaic law but less strict than an absolute prohibition of divorce.

In the kingdom, it was not only true that they should not perjure themselves by failing to perform their oath, which was prohibited in the Mosaic law (Numbers 30:2), but in the kingdom they were not to swear at all, especially in view of man’s limited ability to fulfill his oath. Accordingly, he could say yes or no, but he could not pledge beyond this. This indicates care should be used in giving solemn promises but should not be construed as completely prohibiting entering into a pledge or a promise in this age.

Again, the kingdom standards are in contrast to the Mosaic law with its demand for an eye for an eye and a tooth for a tooth. Those in the kingdom were exhorted not to resist evil, but if smitten on the right cheek, they were to turn the other also. This principle was further expanded by the instruction that if a man be sued at law, he should allow his adversary not only to take his coat or tunic but his cloak or robe also; if compelled to go a mile, he should volunteer to go two; and should give to those that borrow and not turn them away. In the millennial kingdom, such high standards could be literally enforced.

It is not clear whether Jesus expected immediate compliance. Jesus Himself was unresisting as He went to the cross. Paul, however, claimed his rights as a Roman citizen when falsely accused. The principle should probably be construed as being illustrated here but not applicable to every conceivable situation. What might work with the King present in the millennial kingdom might not work in the mystery form of the kingdom with the King absent.

Although some might deduce from the principles of the kingdom expounded here that the Bible supports pacifism, most interpreters would not draw this conclusion. In dealing with publicans, John the Baptist instructed them not to abuse their power (Luk3 13-14). Jesus here was not trying to give hard and fast principles that are applicable under all circumstances, but was stating the ideals which govern His kingdom.

The principle that our acts should be by unselfish love is clear. This is brought out in the closing passage of Matthew 5, where, in contrast to the law, which exhorted men to love their neighbor but permitted them to hate their enemy, Jesus laid down the principle that citizens of His kingdom should love their enemies, bless those that curse them, do good to those that hate them, and pray for those who persecute them. In this, they would emulate the love of God, which causes His sun to shine upon both the evil and the good and sends rain both for the just and unjust. He pointed out that even the world, with its tax collectors, rewards those that reward them and greets those that greet them. Morgan notes love is “the principle of life that crowns everything,” and that love is the guiding principle of this entire chapter The standard of conduct in all areas should be God’s attitude of love.

Chapter 5 concludes with the exhortation to be perfect, as God the Father in heaven is perfect. Perfection here refers to uprightness and sincerity of character with the thought of maturity in godliness or attaining the goal of conformity to the character of God. While sinless perfection is impossible, godliness, in its biblical concept, is attainable.

III. Key Verse Examinations.  Ryrie Study Bible, 1986, Dr. Charles C. Ryrie, Th. M., Th. D., Ph. D., Litt. D., 1925-20

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Charles_Caldwell_Ryrie

5:18. “smallest letter of stroke.” The smallest Hebrew letter is “youdh,” which looks like an apostrophe (‘). A “stroke” is a very small extension or protrusion on several Hebrew letters, which distinguish these from similar ones (like, in English, and R from a P). The Lord’s point is that every letter of every word  of the OT is vital and will  be fulfilled. 

5:20. “your righteousness.” We may understand this as “your practice of religion.” The Pharisees’ righteousness was external; it should be internal. 

5:22. “good for nothing,” or “empty head.” “fiery hell.”  The word translated “hell” is “Geenna,” or “Gehenna,” a place in the valley of Hinnom where human sacrifices had been offered (cf. Jer 7:31) and where the continuous burning of rubbish made it an apt illustration of the lake of fire (Mark 9:44, James 3:6, Rev 20:14).

5:28. The lustful desire in one’s heart can lead to the sinful act.

5:29-30. This is strong language, used to emphasize the comparison; i.e., sin is so dangerous because it leads to external condemnation, that it would be better to lose hands or eyes temporarily than to lose life eternally.

5:32. “except for the reason of unchastity.” It is disallowed except for unchastity, which may mean, (1) adultery, (2), unfaithfulness during the period of betrothal, or (3) marriage between relatives (Lev 18). 

5:33-37. “MAKE FALSE VOWS, ” or perjure yourself. (Oaths taken in the name of the Lord were binding, and perjury was strongly condemned in the law (Ex 20:7, Lev 19:12; Deu 19:16-19). Every oath contained an affirmation or promise, and an appeal to God as the omniscient punisher of  falsehoods, which made the oath binding. Thus we find phrases like “as the Lord lives.” (1 Sam 14:39). The emphasis on the sanctity of oaths led to the feeling that ordinary phrasing need not be truthful or binding. Jesus, however, taught (v 37) that we should say, and mean, yes or no, and never equivocate. 

5:38. See Ex 21:24. The “lex talionis” (law of retaliation) did provide for the ending of feuds, but Christ showed another way to do the same (vs 39-42). See note on Lev 24:20.

5:40. “shirt.” An undergarment. “coat.” An outer garment. 

5:43. “LOVE THY NEIGHBOR. See Lev 19:16-18.

5:44. A new teaching, found nowhere in the OT. 

5:48. “perfect.” Not without sin,but mature and complete in the likeness of God. 

IV. Matthew’s significance to the Jews. J. Dwight Pentecost (Th. B., Th., D., 1915-2014) Things To Come, p 140. 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/J._Dwight_Pentecost

The Gospel of Matthew is the Gospel which presents the Lord Jesus Christ as Yahweh’s King and Israel’s Messiah. It unfolds the presentation of the Messiah to Israel. 

More than any other of the Gospels, Matthew’s is allied with the Hebrew Scriptures in theme and tone; their subjects are its subjects, the Messiah, Israel, the Law, the Kingdom, Prophecy. Jewish ideas and terms characterize the whole record. Its witness would not have impressed either the Roman, for whom Mark wrote, or the Greek for whom Luke wrote, but to Jews its significance would be inescapable.

This fact is borne out by the numerous references to the Son of David (1:1, 20; 9:27, etc); to the fulfillment of prophecy (1:22; 2:5, etc.),to Jewish customs (15:1-2; 27:62), to the Mosaic Law (5:17-19 etc.), to the Sabbath (12:1-2, etc.), and to the holy city and the holy place (4:5:, 24:15; 27:53). Christ is related to prophecy throughout. This will have important bearing on the meaning of the term “kingdom of heaven.”

V.  My Bucket List shows the references that I consult, of theologians and printed resources, whenever I write an article that will be posted. Please go to the Pages of my site to find my Bucket List.

VI. My Websites To Follow . 

https://equippingblog.wordpress.com/ Eternity

https://untotheleastofthese.home.blog/ Book Prep

https://newsandcommentary38395276.wordpress.com/ Thy Kingdom Come

Matthew 5:1-16 (The Moral Principles Of The Kingdom)

I. Video.

A. Title: Mathew Chapter 5.

B. Data: B.Data:  LuisetReneeandBill

II. Introduction. (Mathew Chapter 5). Dr. John F. Walvoord (A.B., M.A., Th. B., Th. M., Th. D., D.D., Litt. D., 1910-2002). The moral principles of the Kingdom.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Walvoord

A. 5:1. Significance and setting of the sermon. The purpose of Matthew to present the truth relating Jesus as the King and the message of the kingdom is the guiding principle in placing the Sermon on the Mount here so early in Matthew’s gospel. Many events recorded later in the gospel actually occurred before the Sermon on the Mount. The Sermon on the Mount is given priority because it is a comprehensive statement of the moral principles relating to the kingdom which Jesus proclaimed. As Kelly comments, it was designed “to counteract the earthly views of the people of Israel

B. In placing this discourse early in Matthew, the intent is plainly to set forth the main principles of Christ’s teaching, which are subsequently rejected in Matthew 8-12. This rejection in turn led to the second major discourse in Matthew 13 on the mysteries of the kingdom, or the age intervening between the first and second advents of Christ. Matthew’s third major discourse, in Matthew 24-25, dealt with the end time preceding the second coming. These three major discourses should be contrasted to the fourth discourse found in John’s gospel, 13-17, dealing specifically with the spiritual character of the present age in which God would call out His church. Matthew’s gospel is, therefore, comprehensive in presenting the three major discourses relating to kingdom truth, and is, as Kelly expresses it, given in “dispensational” order.

C.  That the Sermon on the Mount presents ethical content all agree. That it delineates the gospel that Jesus Christ died and rose again, that it presents justification by faith, or is suitable to point an unbeliever to salvation in Christ is plainly not the intent of this message.

D.The Sermon on the Mount, as a whole, is not church truth precisely. A. W. Pink holds, “Its larger part was a most searching exposition of the spirituality of the Law and the refutation of the false teaching of the elders.” It falls short of presenting the complete rule of life expounded at a greater length in the epistles, and it is not intended to delineate justification by faith or the gospel of salvation. On the other hand, the Sermon on the Mount is clearly intended to be a definitive statement of Christ’s teaching and should not be pushed aside lightly by unnecessary stricture which would relegate it to unimportant truth. If these various limiting approaches are inadequate, what is the true approach?

E. As in every text of Scripture, the truth presented must be first of all seen in its context. In the gospels, Jesus was presenting Himself as the prophesied King, and the kingdom He was offering is the prophesied kingdom. Those who are premillenarian can understand this as referring to the earthly kingdom predicted in the Old Testament. Although Jesus, in His teaching, did not spell out all that was revealed in the Old Testament, He clearly presented Himself as the prophesied King, the Son of David, who had the right to reign on earth. It is quite evident that the Jews, while they wanted deliverance from the Romans and fulfillment of the material blessings promised in the millennium, were quite unprepared to accept the view that the millennial kingdom has spiritual implications. It was to be a rule of righteousness as well as a rule of peace. It demanded much of subjects as well as providing much for them. The political character of the kingdom was not seriously questioned by the Jews, who anticipated that their Messiah would bring deliverance to them. Because of their neglect of the spiritual and moral principles involved, Christ necessarily emphasized these in the Sermon on the Mount. The Sermon accordingly must be understood in this eschatological context. Preferable is the view that Jesus delivered this sermon as Matthew indicated, although probably He repeated many times the truths in the Sermon on the Mount, or delivered the same sermon more than once to different groups (cf. Lk 6:20-49). Here, however, He spoke directly to His disciples, probably the inner circle. But during the discourse, apparently many others joined the crowd, as there is reference to “the people” in Matthew 7:28, which would imply a large crowd.

F.  A careful reading of what Christ said makes it obvious, however, that the principles of the kingdom are far more than merely rules for a future millennium. Proceeding as they do from the nature of God and nature of morality and spiritual truth, many of the statements of Christ in the Sermon on the Mount are general in character, and the appeal is that inasmuch as these general truths must be accepted, their particular application to the kingdom may be taken for granted. In the progress of this narrative, Jesus not only proclaimed lofty general principles, but also made particular applications to current situations. This address can hardly be viewed as only prophetic, and it is clear that Jesus expected immediate response from His hearers, not simply acquiescence that He was telling the truth. Accordingly, the study of the Sermon on the Mount yields its treasures to those who analyze each text, determining its general meaning, its present application, and its relation to the future kingdom program. Problems of interpretation in most instances vanish easily when viewed from this prospective.

G.  Beatitudes, 5:2-12.  introductory verses, picture Jesus seated, imply Christ’s role as a Lawgiver or Rabbi. The Beatitudes pronounce those blessed, or happy, who fulfill these six standards of the kingdom in character and experience: those poor in spirit, or consciously dependent on God; those who mourn; those who are meek, or humble; those who thirst after righteousness; those who are merciful; pure in spirit; and who are peacemakers, although persecuted for righteousness’ sake, are proper disciples and subjects of the kingdom. Through verse 10, these are addressed as “they,” in contrast to “ye” in verses 11-12. Here is illustrated present application of general truth. The disciples were to experience persecution and false accusation. They are exhorted to rejoice in that day because they share persecution similar to that of prophets of old and because they will have great reward in heaven. It is of interest that these words addressed to those living in that generation promised them reward in heaven rather than in the future millennial kingdom. This is realistic, of course, because they would ultimately move into the church with its heavenly destiny and reward.

H. Influence of true disciples, 5:13-16. In verses 13-16, disciples are compared to salt and a lamp. Salt, which has lost its salty character, is utterly useless. While salt can preserve and flavor almost any food, it is useless to add good salt to bad, and salt without flavor should be thrown away. So disciples, without true moral character and spiritual commitment to the King, are useless in the kingdom of heaven. It also implies the rottenness of the world, which needs the preservative of the salt. Likewise, disciples should be like a light or lamp, which, if it is going to fulfill its function, must be on a lampstand and not hidden under a bushel. The disciples were to be like a city set on a hill, and to let their light shine. The result would be that they would not attract men to themselves but would glorify the Father in heaven. The implication of this passage is that only those who have experienced conversion and transformation by the grace of God can be true citizens of the kingdom of heaven. The same thought was expressed to Nicodemus in John 3, when Jesus said, “Except a man be born of water and of the Spirit, he cannot enter into the kingdom of God” (John 3:5). What John describes as casual, new birth or new life, Matthew considers as result, new morality, new character, new witness. Both demand genuineness to be a true subject of the kingdom of heaven.

III. Key Verse Examinations.  Ryrie Study Bible, 1986 (Dr. Charles C. Ryrie, Th. M., Th. D., Ph. D., Litt. D., 1925-2016).

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Charles_Caldwell_Ryrie

A. 5:1. The sermon on the mount does not present the way of salvation, but the way of righteous living for those who are in God’s family, contrasting the new Way with the “old one” of the scribes and the pharisees. For the Jews of Christ’s day this message was a detailed explanation of “Repent” (3:2, 4:17). It was also an elaboration of the spirit of the law (5:17, 21-22, 27-28). For all of us it is a detailed revelation of the righteousness of God, and its principles are applicable to the children of God today. 

B. 5:3-12. The “Beatitudes” (“Blessed ”  means “happy”) describe the inner  qualities of a follower of Christ, and promise him blessings in the future. They contrast sharply with the characteristics of the Pharisees, who were proud, thinking they had already attained righteousness.

C. 5:13. “salt” preserves, creates thirst, and cleanses.

IV. Purposes of Matthew. Christ in the Scriptures, Dr. Charles L. Quarles (M. Div., Ph. D.).

https://www.sebts.edu/academics/faculty/Quarles.aspx

Matthew, as a Jew, unashamedly shapes his account about Jesus’ life so it is understood by a Jewish audience. His goal is to convince his peers that the King of kings has come. With this in mind, he uses terms and names that Jews will resonate with. By quoting more passages from the Old Testament than any other New Testament writer, he attempts to validate that Jesus is indeed the promised Messiah. No less than 12 times Matthew presents Jesus as Israel’s Messianic King (1:232:263:174:15–1721:5922:444526:6427:1127–37).

V. Kingdom of Heaven vs Kingdom of God.

J. Dwight Pentecost (Th. B., Th., D., 1915-2014) Things To Come, p 434. 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/J._Dwight_Pentecost

In the Gospel according to Matthew, this kingdom is designated in the main as the kingdom of heaven, whereas the Kingdom of God is mentioned but a few times. Matthew was writing to the Jews who had a peculiar reverence for the name “God”–mark this, in spite of their most evident lack of perception of the true nature of the kingdom—and would easily understand the meaning of “the kingdom of heaven.”  Mark and Luke, on the other hand, are written to Gentiles, so they use the phrase “kingdom of God” rather than the other. The kingdom is characterized as the kingdom of heaven because it is patterned after heaven and its perfection. Reference is also made in this name to the eternal and lasting value of this dominion. Furthermore, there is involved the thought of the heavenly origin and source of the kingdom, the God of heaven being He who will set it up. The name “kingdom of God” is employed because it points to the spiritual character of the reign and dominion. The Glory of God is its chief and sole object. Christ’s work in which He seeks only to glorify His Father is complete when God is glorified. This is the aim and purpose of the kingdom of God.

VI. Parting thoughts.

Whereas Nicodemus (John Chapter 3) lived in the “Kingdom of Heaven,” where God prevented Jupiter from bumping into Mars, Jesus told him the only way that he could see “the Kingdom of God” (John 3:3) enter the kingdom of God (John 3:5) he would have to be born again. The Kingdom of Heaven relates to a physical place, which is God’s designed creation; the Kingdom of God relates to a spiritual relationship between mankind and God through Jesus (John 3:8), whereby born again individuals will be taken by Jesus to spend eternity with Him away from this earth (John 14:2-6; Rev 4:1-4). More will be discussed on the subject of heaven, when we consider” the new heaven, new earth, and new Jerusalem” (Rev 21:1-2).

VII.  My Bucket List shows the references that I consult, of theologians and printed resources, whenever I write an article that will be posted. Please go to the Pages of my site to find my Bucket List.

VIII. My Websites To Follow . 

https://equippingblog.wordpress.com/ Eternity

https://untotheleastofthese.home.blog/ Book Prep

https://newsandcommentary38395276.wordpress.com/ Thy Kingdom Come

Matthew 4 (Ministry to Jews)

I. Video.

A. Title: Matthew Chapter 4

B. Data:  LuisetReneeandBill

II. Introduction. (Mathew Chapter 4). Dr. John F. Walvoord (A.B., M.A., Th. B., Th. M., Th. D., D.D., Litt. D., 1910-2002). 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Walvoord

A. The message of Jesus to Capernaum was similar to that of John the Baptist, “Repent; for the kingdom of heaven is at hand.” This was the theme of His ministry until it became evident that He would be rejected. The kingdom being at hand meant that it was being offered in the person of the prophesied King, but it did not mean that it would be immediately fulfilled.

B. Because of Capernaum’s proximity to the Sea of Galilee, it was natural for Jesus at this time to call His disciples who were fishermen (cf. Mk 1:16-20Lk 5:1-11Jn 1:35-42). To Peter and Andrew, fishing in the sea, He extended the invitation, “Follow me, and I will make you fishers of men” (Mt 4:19). In like manner, He called James and John, the sons of Zebedee, who were mending their nets. They too left their occupation and their father and followed Christ. Matthew here records the early call of these disciples. Lenski, because of the disparity between this account and that of Luke 5:1-11, holds that between this first call of Matthew and the call in Luke, the early disciples continued to fish for a time and not until the call in Luke 5 did they forsake all.26 While Matthew’s gospel indicates that they followed Jesus, there is no clear statement that they left their fishing occupation for good.

C. In the days which followed, ceaseless activity characterized the ministry of Jesus (cf. Mk 3:7-12Lk 6:17-19). Going from one synagogue to the next, He preached the gospel of the kingdom, performed countless acts of healing, and was followed by great multitudes, who came not only from Galilee but from Jerusalem in the south and from the territory of Decapolis and Perea on the east of Jordan. His miracles dealt not simply with trivial diseases but with incurable afflictions, such as epilepsy, palsy, and demon possession. No affliction was beyond His healing touch. The kingdom blessings promised by Isaiah 35:5-6, due for fulfillment in the future kingdom, here became the credentials of the King in His first coming.

III. Key Verse Examinations.  Ryrie Study Bible, 1986 (Dr. Charles C. Ryrie, Th. M., Th. D., Ph. D., Litt. D., 1925-2016).

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Charles_Caldwell_Ryrie

A. 4:17. Like John the Baptist, Christ also preached the necessity of repentance before the messianic kingdom could be established.

B. 4:19. “Follow me.” This was their call to service, and illustrates the directness, profundity, and power of Christ’s command (“go…28:19; “love one another.”  John 13:34). 

C.  4:23. “the gospel of the kingdom.” This is the good news that the presence of the King caused the rule of God on the earth (in fulfillment of many OT prophecies) to be “at hand.” Prerequisites for entrance into the kingdom included repentance (v. 17), righteousness (v. 5:20), childlike faith (18:3), or, in summary, being born again (John 3:3). Because the people rejected these requirements, Christ taught that His earthly reign would not immediately come (Luke 19:11). However, this gospel of the kingdom will be preached again during the Tribulation (24:14), just prior to the return of Christ to establish His kingdom on earth (25:31, 34). 

IV. Purposes of Matthew. Dr. Charles L. Quarles (M. Div., Ph. D. )

https://www.sebts.edu/academics/faculty/Quarles.aspx

A key purpose of the book is to outline the characteristics of the kingdom of God, both for Israel and the church. Orthodox Jews would typically scoff at any assertion that Jesus is their Messiah, let alone their King. They would retort, “If Jesus is King, where is the promised restoration of the kingdom of Israel?” Many Jews of Jesus’ day rejected Him as Messiah, even though both Jesus and John the Baptist continually preached that the kingdom was “at hand” (3:24:1710:7). This rejection of Jesus by the Jews is a dominant theme of Matthew (11:12–2412:28–4521:33–22:14). Because of this rejection, God postponed the fulfillment of His promises to Israel and subsequently extended His blessings to both Jew and Gentile in the church.

V. NASB Study Bible notes.

A. 4:12-13. Jesus begins His ministry. 

B. 4:14-16. This was to fulfill what was spoken through Isaiah the prophet: Isa (9:1-9:2).  

C. 4:17.  The message of Jesus: “Repent, for the kingdom of heaven is at hand.” (See Ryrie note III. A., C.)

D. 4:19. Evangelism was at the heart of the call of Jesus to His disciples.

E. 4:20. The call to discipleship is definite and demands a response of total commitment.

F. 4:23. The synagogues provided a place for teaching on the Sabbath. During the week preaching took place to larger crowds in the open air. 

VI. Parting thoughts.

The focus of Matthew’s gospel is that of Jesus and His ministry to Jews, and did not include ministry to Gentiles (10:5-7). Gentiles would have had no knowledge of the prophecies of Isaiah, neither would Gentiles have been allowed into Synagogues. The preaching of Jesus provided Jews with a glimpse of what the conditions of the Kingdom will be like (Isa 9:6b-7). The preaching of the Gospel of Heaven is not what we preach today. We preach of the death, burial, and resurrection of Jesus (1 Cor 15:1-8). The Jews of Matthew did not know about the death of Jesus until Matt 17:22-23. Jesus discontinued His offer of the Kingdom of Heaven to Israel, following His being rejected by the Jews (Mt 12:14, 22-24; 13:11). The offer to Israel of the Kingdom will be made again during the Tribulation (Matt 24:14).

VII. Closing Video.

A Title: I Will Follow Him.

B. Andre Rieu

VII.  My Bucket List shows the references that I consult, of theologians and printed resources, whenever I write an article that will be posted. Please go to the Pages of my site to find my Bucket List.

VIII . My Websites To Follow.

https://equippingblog.wordpress.com/ Eternity

https://untotheleastofthese.home.blog/ Book Prep

https://newsandcommentary38395276.wordpress.com/ Thy Kingdom Come

Matthew 3 (The Kingdom Offered To Israel)

I. Video:

A. Title: Matthew Chapter 3.

B. Data: LuisetReneeandBill.

II. Introduction. (Mathew Chapter 3). Dr. John F. Walvoord (A.B., M.A., Th. B., Th. M., Th. D., D.D., Litt. D., 1910-2002). 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Walvoord

A. The message of John was like that of Elijah, as he heralded his exhortation to Pharisees as well as Sadducees and to all who came: “Repent; for the kingdom of heaven is at hand.” His role was that of a herald coming before the king. Matthew finds John fulfilling the prediction of Isa 40:3-5), that there would be a voice crying in the wilderness to prepare the way before the Lord. Like the servants of a king who would smooth out and straighten the road in preparation for their sovereign’s coming, so John was preparing the way spiritually for the coming of Christ. 

B. John’s message was a stern rebuke of the hypocrisy and shallow religion of both the Pharisees and the Sadducees. Unquestionably, he was attacking the established religion of his day and demanding sincerity and repentance instead of hypocrisy and religious rites. His call to repentance is backed up by the succinct announcement, “The kingdom of heaven is at hand.” What did John mean by “kingdom of heaven”? 

C. While the precise phrase is not found in the Old Testament, it is based on Old Testament terminology. Nebuchadnezzar, for instance, referred to God as the “King of heaven” (Dan 4:37). Daniel had predicted that the climax of world history would come with the advent of the Son of man, who would be given an everlasting kingdom. This was likewise to be fulfilled by the prediction of (Dan 2:44) that “the God of heaven” would “set up a  kingdom, which shall never be destroyed.” Matthew, alone of New Testament writers, uses “the kingdom of heaven” and rarely uses “the kingdom of God,” which is often used in parallel passages in the other gospels and throughout the New Testament. Most expositors consider the two terms identical. Although the kingdom of heaven and the kingdom of God are similar, there seems to be some distinction. The kingdom of heaven refers to that which is obviously in its outer character a kingdom from above. The kingdom of God is more specific and does not seem to include any but true believers who are born again. In Matt 13, the kingdom of heaven seems to include both the good and bad fish caught in the net and the wheat and the tares in the same field, whereas Nicodemus is informed that the new birth is necessary to enter the kingdom of God (Jn 3:5). All agree that those in the kingdom of God are also in the kingdom of heaven, however. Eschatologically and dispensationally, a threefold distinction must be observed in the use of the term “kingdom of heaven.” First, in John the Baptist’s ministry, it is announced as at hand, meaning that in the person of the King, Jesus Christ, the kingdom was being presented to Israel. Second, in Matt 13, the kingdom in its present mystery form is revealed, that is, the rule of God over the earth during the present age when the King is absent. These are mysteries because they were not anticipated in the Old Testament doctrine of the kingdom. The third and climactic form of the kingdom will be when Christ returns to set up the kingdom of heaven on earth, in fulfillment of Daniel’s prophecies and countless other passages of the Old Testament that picture a golden age, when the Son of David will reign over the entire world in righteousness and peace. Only the premillennial interpretation of the concept of the kingdom allows a literal interpretation of both Old Testament and New Testament prophecies relating to the future kingdom. The ministry of John the Baptist signaled a spiritual crisis in Israel. Would they accept their King, or would they reject Him? 

D. The ministry of John the Baptist was to prepare the way by calling Israel to repentance. It is rather a religious rite, signifying their confession of  sins and commitment to a new holy life, such as was proper for Jews in the old dispensation. The ministry of John the Baptist was very pointed: he challenged the prevailing Jewish concept that they were saved simply because they were descendants of Abraham; he declared that God is able to raise up children unto Abraham from the stones of the earth, certainly a dramatic picture of supernatural, spiritual resurrection; he declared that the ax is already in hand to cut down every tree that does not bring forth fruit. By this he meant individual Jews as well as Judaism as a dead ritual.

III. Key Verse Examinations.  Ryrie Study Bible, 1986, Dr. Charles C. Ryrie, Th. M., Th. D., Ph. D., Litt. D., 1925-2016).

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Charles_Caldwell_Ryrie

A. 3:2. “Repent.” Repentance is a change of mind that bears fruit in a changed life (see vs 8). “kingdom of heaven.” This is a rule of heaven over the earth. The Jewish people of Christ’s day were looking for this messianic, or Davidic kingdom, to be established on this earth, and this is what John proclaimed as being “at hand.” The requirement that the people must repent in order for the kingdom to be established was new and became a stumbling block to them. The rejection of Christ by the people delayed its establishment until the second coming of Christ (25:31). The character of the kingdom today is described in the parables of Matthew 13.

B. 3:15. “to fulfill all righteousness.” Jesus fulfilled all the righteous requirements to  be Israel’s Messiah. Also, by allowing John to baptize Him, He identified with sinners whom He came to save, though, of course, He Himself had no sin to repent of.

IV. Emphases of Matthew. Matthew. Dr. Charles L. Quarles (M. Div., Ph. D. 

https://www.sebts.edu/academics/faculty/Quarles.aspx

A. The Gospel of Matthew has many Jewish overtones. For example, the term “kingdom of heaven” appears 33 times and the term “kingdom of God” four times. No other Gospel lays such stress on the kingdom; the restoration of the glories of David’s kingdom was a burning hope for many Jews at the time. Matthew clearly identifies Jesus with that hope by using the Jewish royal title “Son of David” nine times in his Gospel. Furthermore he calls Jerusalem “the holy city” (4:527:53) and the “city of the great King” (5:35), both uniquely Jewish ways of referring to it. First-century Jews emphasized righteousness, and Matthew uses the words “righteous” and “righteousness” more often than the Gospels of Mark, Luke, and John combined.

B.  Matthew also discusses the law, ceremonial cleanness, the Sabbath, the temple, David, the Messiah, the fulfillment of Old Testament prophecies, and Moses—all from a Jewish point of view. He has 53 Old Testament citations and more than 70 allusions to the Hebrew Scriptures. Thirteen times, the book emphasizes that Jesus’ actions were a direct fulfillment of Old Testament prophecies. The genealogy of chapter 1 is recognizably Jewish, tracing the lineage of Jesus back through David to Abraham, the father of the Jewish people. Furthermore the Gospel mentions Jewish rulers (see 2:12214:1) and customs such as ceremonial washing (see 15:2) without explanation, indicating that Matthew expected his predominantly Jewish audience to be familiar with such practices.

V. The Kingdom described (Ryrie Study Bible).

A. The glory of the future kingdom (Isaiah 2:1-4).

B. The governing of Messiah over the kingdom (Isaiah 9:6a-7).

C. Harmony in the Kingdom (Isaiah 11:1-16).

D. Characteristics of the Kingdom (Isaiah 65:18-25).

VI. Parting Thought. 

Matthew’s gospel was written only to Jews. The offer of the Kingdom by Jesus was made only to Jews (Matt 10:1-7). As Jesus was offering the Kingdom to the Jews of Israel, He made a point of telling them that because they were being offered the Kingdom, that they should repent of the way that they had been living, and to act like Kingdom people. Jesus’s ministry was not to Gentiles. Jesus instructed His disciples in the way that they should witness to Gentiles after His ascension to Heaven (Matt 28:18-19). It is obvious that, after having read the above paragraph on the conditions of the kingdom, that the Kingdom has not yet come (Matt 6:10). Scripture does not say that the Kingdom will enter us; however we are told that we will enter the kingdom. The new birth is not the kingdom.

VII.  My Bucket List shows the references that I consult, of theologians and printed resources, whenever I write an article that will be posted. Please go to the Pages of my site to find my Bucket List.

VIII . My Websites To Follow.

https://equippingblog.wordpress.com/ Eternity

https://untotheleastofthese.home.blog/ Book Prep

https://newsandcommentary38395276.wordpress.com/ Thy Kingdom Come

Matthew 2 (Jews or Gentiles?)

I. Video.

A. Video Title. Wise Men From The East (Matthew 2:1-15)

B. Video Data. Sandy Tales

II. Introduction. The Presentation And Rejection Of The Theocratic Kingdom Recorded By Matthew. J. Dwight Pentecost, Things To Come, p 456, 462. (Th. B., Th. M. Th. D., 1915-2014). https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/J._Dwight_Pentecost

A. The purpose of the writing of the Gospel of Matthew was to record the presentation of Jesus Christ as Messiah, to trace the opposition to Him and His offered kingdom by the nation, and to record the official and final rejection of that King and kingdom by Israel. 

B. There are three major movements in the Gospel of Matthew:

1. The presentation and authentication of the King (1:1-11:1).

2. The opposition to the King (11:2-16:12).

3. The final rejection of the King (16:13-28:20).

C. The Gospel of Matthew was written to present the Messiah to Israel and to record the attitude of the nation to Him.

1. The first movement of the book has to do with His presentation and authentication, as He is shown to have the legal, moral, judicial, and prophetic rights to the throne, which rights are fully authenticated by the King in His miracles.  

2. The second movement observed is the opposition and rejection of the Messiah by the nation of Israel. The opposition grows into the open rejection by the nation. As a result of this rejection a mystery program for a new age is revealed.

3. The third movement has to do with the culmination of the rejection in the death of the Messiah. It was the King of the Jews that was crucified. The resurrection of the Crucified One is a divine approval of all His claims and His authentication as Messiah. Because Israel rejected the Messiah, they bear their sin until He comes to redeem the nation and to reign in glory, acclaimed as Messiah by all. 

III.  Dispersion Of The Jews.  Israel My Glory. https://israelmyglory.org/article/the-regathering-of-israel/

A. The Bible clearly teaches two distinct dispersions and two subsequent regatherings of the nation of Israel. The first dispersion was prophesied in Deuteronomy 28:36–37 and occurred in two phases. The first phase took place about 721 B.C., when the northern kingdom (Israel) was carried away into Assyria (cp. 2 Ki. 17:6). The second phase began around 608 B.C. when Judah, the southern kingdom, was carried captive into Babylon (cp. 2 Ki. 24:11–16; 25:8–11). Jeremiah-prophesied that the latter dispersion would last 70 years (Jer. 25:11). There was a partial return during the time of Ezra and Nehemiah, around 538 B.C. 

B. The Deportation of the Southern Kingdom of Judah  https://bible-history.com/map-babylonian-captivity/the-deportation-of-judah

2 Kings 24:14-16 “Also he carried into captivity all Jerusalem: all the captains and all the mighty men of valor, ten thousand captives, and all the craftsmen and smiths. None remained except the poorest people of the land. And he carried Jehoiachin captive to Babylon. The king’s mother, the king’s wives, his officers, and the mighty of the land he carried into captivity from Jerusalem to Babylon. All the valiant men, seven thousand, and craftsmen and smiths, one thousand, all who were strong and fit for war, these the king of Babylon brought captive to Babylon.”

This was not the first time that the Jews in the Southern Kingdom of Judah were taken into captivity. Sennacherib, about 701 BC, is stated to have carried into Assyria 200,000 captives from the Jewish cities that he took (2 Kings 18:13).

The carrying away of the people of Judah to Babylon was not accomplished at one time. Three distinct deportations are mentioned in 2 Kings 24:14 (including 10,000 persons) and 2 Kings 25:11, one in 2 Chron 36:20, three in Jer 52:28-30 (including 4,600 persons), and one in Dan 1:3.

The two principal deportations were:

(1) when Jehoiachin with all his nobles, soldiers, and artificers were carried away; and

(2) that which followed the destruction of Jerusalem and the capture of Zedekiah, 586 B.C. The three mentioned by Jeremiah may have been contributions from the more distinguished portions of the captives, and the captivity of certain selected “children” (Dan 1:3), 607 BC, may have occurred when Nebuchadnezzar was a colleague of his father, Nabopolassar. 

C. The Captivity to the return. 

https://bible-history.com/old-testament/return-from-babylon

-from-“Now in the first year of Cyrus king of Persia, that the word of the LORD by the mouth of Jeremiah might be fulfilled, the LORD stirred up the spirit of Cyrus king of Persia, that he made a proclamation throughout all his kingdom, and [put it] also in writing, saying, Thus saith Cyrus king of Persia, The LORD God of heaven hath given me all the kingdoms of the earth; and he hath charged me to build him an house at Jerusalem, which [is] in Judah. Who [is there] among you of all his people? his God be with him, and let him go up to Jerusalem, which [is] in Judah, and build the house of the LORD God of Israel, (he [is] the God,) which [is] in Jerusalem.”

– Ezra 1:1-3 

The Return from Babylon

The people of Judah were horribly distressed. They lost their home, their city, their pride, their Temple, the ark of the covenant, and they were taken as prisoners to Babylon, the homeland of idolatry. But God raised up great men to remind them of Jeremiah’s prophesies, that they would only be there for 70 years. Babylon would not be their home:

Jer 29:10-14 For thus says the LORD: After seventy years are completed at Babylon, I will visit you and perform My good word toward you, and cause you to return to this place. For I know the thoughts that I think toward you, says the LORD, thoughts of peace and not of evil, to give you a future and a hope. Then you will call upon Me and go and pray to Me, and I will listen to you. And you will seek Me and find Me, when you search for Me with all your heart. I will be found by you, says the LORD, and I will bring you back from your captivity; I will gather you from all the nations and from all the places where I have driven you, says the LORD, and I will bring you to the place from which I cause you to be carried away captive.

They would return and the temple would be rebuilt, and the Messiah would still come. Daniel and Ezekiel sought to keep the true faith alive.

The Decree of Cyrus

By 538 BC. Babylon had passed into history and the Medo-Persian Empire took its place. Cyrus the Persian issued a decree to allow the Jews to go back to their land, and with the blessing of The Persian Empire. The Jews were hardly moved. Babylon was their home. Only a portion returned (Neh 7) and only 74 of the Levites, who were supposed to be known for their dedication to the things of God.

The Persians

Zerubbabel

The first move back to Israel was led by Zerubbabel, of the house of David. He was the only one of royal blood to pay any attention to the decree of Cyrus (Ezra 2). When he returned, he found just rubble. No temple, torn down walls, and a mixed breed of corrupt Jews (Samaritans) living there. In 536 BC. he laid the foundations for a new temple, built an altar and worshipped the Lord. The prophets Haggai and Zechariah helped urge the Jews on. They finished the work on the Temple in 516 BC. (exactly 70 years).

Ezra and Nehemiah

58 years later (458 BC) more Jews returned (Ezra 7) under the leadership of Ezra. 12 years later, Nehemiah, received permission to rebuild the walls of Jerusalem and to govern Judea. He arrived in 444 BC. Despite much opposition, Nehemiah completed this seemingly hopeless task in 52 days. Then a revival followed. Ezra and Nehemiah canonized the books of the Old Testament. They read aloud to the people and gave interpretation. About 40 years later, the prophet Malachi condemned the people for slipping back into their sinful ways.

https://www.ancient-origins.net/history-important-events/rivers-babylon-life-ancient-babylon-s-thriving-jewish-community-0010021

By the rivers of Babylon: Life In Ancient Babylon’s Thriving Jewish Community.

In the 6th-century BC, the armies of Babylon destroyed Jerusalem and the Kingdom of Judah. They tore down the city walls, burned the temples, and ran down every person who tried to escape. The few survivors were dragged out of their homeland and forced to live in Babylon as vassals to the men who butchered their children.

And yet, when the Jews in exile won their freedom, most of them didn’t leave. They stayed in Babylon – and kept a thriving community that lasted for more than 2,000 years.

It’s one of the stranger moments in human history. These people were brutalized by an invading army. They were taught to hate so viciously that, for hundreds of years, the word “Babylon”, to the Jews, was synonymous with evil. But most chose to stay right there with their captors, living side-by-side with the men who had made their lives miserable.

Why didn’t they leave? It’s a question that’s plagued historians and theologians alike; but some recently uncovered documents shed a little light on how Babylon created a Jewish community that still lives on today.

That doesn’t mean that every Jew in Babylon was living in paradise. Most were poor; typically, they were farmers who struggled to feed their families through heavy taxes from the state. In Babylon, though, they had opportunity. They had a way of rising up to the top, even if most didn’t make it.

Perhaps that’s why they stayed. About sixty years after the Babylonian exile began, the Jews were freed. The Persian Empire defeated Babylon and allowed the Jews to return to the home country. About 40,000 people took the offer and went home – but another 80,000 stayed behind in Babylon.

IV. Ongoing return of Jews to Jerusalem. MacArthur Study Bible. Note on Lev Chapter 23. The three major feasts for which all males were required to traveled to the temple in Jerusalem (Ex 23:14-19)

A. Unleavened Bread (Ex 12;15-20)

B. Pentecost (Harvest or Weeks) (Deu 16:9-12; Ac 2:1)

C. Booths (Tabernacles  or Ingathering (Neh 8:13-28; Jn 7:2)

V. Dispersed Areas From Where Jews Returned To Jerusalem For Jewish Feasts

A. The name of Babylon appears in the Bible 273 times, and in each instance, “Babylon means Babylon.

1.2 Kings 17:6, “Halah and Habor, on the river or Gozan in the cities of the Medes. (721. B.C.)

2.2 Kings 24:10-16; 25:11-21, To Babylon (607-586 B.C.)

3. Esther 2:5-8, “Susa” in Persia ( 519 B.C.)

4. Acts 2:9-11, Parthians and Medes and Elamites, and residents of Mesopotamia, Judea and Cappadocia, Judea and Pamphylia, Pontus and Asia, Phrygia and Pamphylia, Egypt and the districts of Libya around Cyrene, and Rome… (33 A.D.)

5.1 Peter 1:1-2, Pontus, Galatia, Cappadocia, Asia and Bithynia (60 A.D.)

VI. Were the wise men Jews or Gentiles? (Matthew 2:1-13).

A. The theocratic kingdom under the prophets.

1. God entered into an eternal, unconditional covenant with David (2 Sam 7:16, 1042 B.C.) in which God guaranteed that the Davidic kingdom should come to full realization as one from David’s line reigned forever. The prophets were the divinely appointed spokesmen for God, who relayed God’s message to the kings, who sometimes obeyed, but with greater frequency did not. (The Coming Kingdom, p 441).

2. The future theocratic kingdom now becomes the major theme of the prophets’ message (The Coming Kingdom, p 442).

3. The prophets, with one voice, describe this one kingdom, thus restored, in terms expressive of the most glorious additions. They predict, from the Psalmist, down to Malachi, a restoration of the identical overthrown Kingdom, linked with the astounding events which shall produce a blessedness and glory unexampled in the history of the world….Since the overthrow of the Theocratic-Davidic Kingdom, these predicted events have not taken place as delineated, and therefore, the predicted covenanted Kingdom has not yet appeared….It is the same Kingdom overthrown has not yet appeared….It is the same Kingdom overthrown that receives those additions, and not another Kingdom that obtains them; hence, no professed Kingdom, however loudly proclaimed and learnedly presented, should, lacking these, be accepted by us….Those additions are so great in their nature, so striking in their characteristics, so manifesting the interface of the Supernatural, that no one can possibly mistake when this Kingdom is restored….After the downfall of the Davidic Kingdom, the Prophets predict this Kingdom as Future. (The Coming Kingdom p 445).

4. The Jewish prophets provided very specific information on who it would be from the line of David’s line, and the details of who would be the King of the Davidic Kingdom, the Messiah:

a. Isaiah 7:14 (742 B.C.) would born of a virgin. Fulfilled in Matthew 1:18-23.

b. Micah 5:2 ((710 B.C.) would be born in Bethlehem. Fulfilled in Matthew 2:4-6.

c. Matthew 10:5-7 (31 A.D.) The offer of the Davidic Kingdom would be made only to Jews, and not to Gentiles, with the message, “the kingdom of Heaven is at hand (meaning, the kingdom of heaven is near, but not here.”

B. Who Were The Wise Men?

1. Jews and the Feast of Pentecost.

The Feast of Pentecost is the Greek phrase for a Jewish feast day, also known as the Feast of Weeks (Exodus 34:22) or Feast of Harvest (Exodus 23:16). Pentecost is a Greek term that means “fiftieth,” and the Feast of Pentecost took place 50 days after Passover.

The Lord instituted this celebration when He renewed His covenant with the people as He spoke to Moses in Exodus 34:22-23. In Numbers 28:26, the feast is called the Day of First Fruits. The day was to consist of:

  • A holy convocation wherein people would not do ordinary work
  • An offering of new grain
  • A burnt offering of two bulls, one ram, seven one-year-old male lambs, their grain offering of fine flour mixed with oil (three-tenths of an ephah for each bull, two tenths for one ram, and a tenth for each lamb), and one male goat (all blemish-free), along with their drink offering.

The celebration usually took place in May or early June, 50 days after Passover.

2. Peter’s Message on the Day of Pentecost. (33 A.D.)

a. The audience was Jewish (Acts 2:9-13). (V.A.5 above).

b. The sermon that Peter preached related to the Jewish prophet, Joel , of whom Gentiles would have had no knowledge. (Acts 2:16-36; Joel 2:28-32; 39). (33 A.D.)

c. Gentiles were not allowed in the Temple (Acts 21:28-19). (60 A.D.)

3. Consider the Magi. The Magi traveled about 800-900 miles, from the area of Persia to see the Christ Child. There is nothing that would indicate that these men were other than Jews. God did not send prophetic messages to Gentiles, as he did concerning the Messiah, and the end times. There are many opinions on this matter, but it is important to remember that Jesus went to the Jews (John 1:11), and that He had no ministry to Gentiles, just as His disciples followed his teaching on the subject. The offer of the Davidic Kingdom was made only to Jews, which was the purpose of Christ coming to our world. Jesus instructed His disciples on ministry to Gentiles, but that did not happen until 41 A.D., in the case of Cornelius (Acts 10: 34-43), when the Apostle Peter preached the message of Jesus, of His death, burial and resurrection (Acts 10:39-40).

VII.  My Bucket List shows the references that I consult, of theologians and printed resources, whenever I write an article that will be posted. Please go to the Pages of my site to find my Bucket List.

VIII. My Websites To Follow.

https://equippingblog.wordpress.com/ Eternity

https://untotheleastofthese.home.blog/ Book Prep

https://newsandcommentary38395276.wordpress.com/ Thy Kingdom Come

Matthew And Israel (Chapter 1)

I. Video. 

A. Title. Who Wrote Matthew, Mark, Luke and John?

B. Data. John Ankerberg Show. Drs. John Ankerberg  (M. Div., D. Min.), Darrell Bock (Th. M.; Ph. D.)

II. Introduction. (Mathew Chapter 1). Dr. John F. Walvoord (A.B., M.A., Th. B., Th. M., Th. D., D.D., Litt. D., 1910-2002). 

A.  Matthew’s purpose obviously was to demonstrate that Jesus Christ was the promised Messiah of the Old Testament, that He fulfilled the requirements of being the promised King who would be a descendant of David, and that His life and ministry fully support the conclusion that He is the prophesied Messiah of Israel.

B. The gospel of Matthew, accordingly, presents Christ’s royal genealogy and the early recognition that He was indeed the King of the Jews. These historical materials are followed by the Sermon on the Mount, stating the moral principles of the kingdom, given more extensively in Matthew than in the other gospels. The theme is continued by presenting the sayings and the miracles of Christ as His credentials prophesied in the Old Testament.C. Having laid this broad base, Matthew then proceeds to account for the fact that Christ did not bring in His prophesied kingdom at His first coming. The growing rejection of Christ, His denunciation of the unbelief of the Jews, and His revelation of truth relating to the period between the two advents  (Mt 13) serve to support this point.

III. Purposes Of Matthew. Dr. Charles L. Quarles (M. Div., Ph. D.) 

A. Matthew’s Gospel serves several purposes beyond presenting a mere biography of Jesus. One purpose is to prove to Jewish readers that Jesus is their Messiah and promised King. The genealogy in chapter 1 points to Christ as the One who inherited God’s promises to David of an eternal dynasty. Jesus’ use of a familiar messianic psalm in Matthew 22:41–44 would have clearly implied to any Jew that He was the heir of the Davidic throne. Even though many Jews of Jesus’ time were blind to Jesus’ identity, Gentiles (such as the wise men) identified Him as Israel’s promised King when He was a baby. Finally, the charge that hung above Jesus’ head on the Cross clearly highlights His royalty: THIS IS JESUS, THE KING OF THE JEWS (27:37). But most important, the Book of Matthew proves Jesus’ legitimate authority by highlighting His wise teaching and righteous life (7:2829).

B. Another purpose of the book is to outline the characteristics of the kingdom of God for Israel. Orthodox Jews would typically scoff at any assertion that Jesus is their Messiah, let alone their King. They would retort, “If Jesus is King, where is the promised restoration of the kingdom of Israel?” Many Jews of Jesus’ day rejected Him as Messiah, even though both Jesus and John the Baptist continually preached that the kingdom was “at hand” (3:24:1710:7). This rejection of Jesus by the Jews is a dominant theme of Matthew (11:12–2412:28–4521:33–22:14). Because of this rejection, God postponed the fulfillment of His promises to Israel. 

IV. Key Verse Examination (1:1). “The Person Of The King.” Ryrie Study Bible, 1986, Dr. Charles C. Ryrie, Th. M., Th. D., Ph. D., Litt. D., 1925-2016).

A. Verse. 1:1. The record of the genealogy of Jesus the Messiah, the son of David, the son of Abraham:

B. Note. “Jesus the Messiah.” The name “Jesus” is from the Greek (and Latin) for the Hebrew “Jeshua” (Joshua), which means “the Lord is salvation.” “Messiah” is from the Hebrew “Meshiah” (Gk. Christ), meaning “anointed one.”Son of David” was a highly popular messianic title of the times. 

V.  My Bucket List shows the references that I consult, of theologians and printed resources, whenever I write an article that will be posted. Please go to the Pages of my site to find my Bucket List.

VI . My Websites To Follow.

https://equippingblog.wordpress.com/ Eternity

https://untotheleastofthese.home.blog/ Book Prep

https://newsandcommentary38395276.wordpress.com/ Thy Kingdom Come

Prophecies Concerning Israel (Daniel 12)

I. Video.

A. Video Title. How is God’s prophetic plan for the end times laid out in the Book of Daniel, Chapters 6-12.

B. Video Data. John Ankerberg Show. Drs. John Ankerberg (M. Div., D. Min.) Jimmy DeYoung (M. Div., Ph. D., 1940-2021).

II. Introduction. The Time Of The End. Dr. John F. Walvoord (A.B., M.A., Th. B., Th. M., Th. D., D.D., Litt. D., 1910-2002). 

A. Added to the previous revelation are the important disclosures (1) that the time of the end has a special relationship to “the children of thy people,” that is, Israel, (2) that Israel will experience at that time a special deliverance to be realized by those in Israel who worship God, and (3) that the doctrine of resurrection, which climaxes the time of the end, is the special hope of those who are martyred.

B. The entire section from Daniel 11:36 to 12:3 constitutes a revelation of the major factors of the time of the end which may be summarized as follows: (1) a world ruler, (2) a world religion, (3) a world war, (4) a time of great tribulation for Israel, (5) deliverance for the people of God at the end of the tribulation, (6) resurrection and judgment, and (7) reward of the righteous. All of these factors are introduced in this section. Added elsewhere in the Scriptures are the additional facts that this time of the end begins with the breaking of the covenant by “the prince that shall come” (Dan 9:26-27); that the “time of the end” will last for three and one-half years (Dan 7:25; 12:7Rev 13:5); that the time of the end is the same as the time of Jacob’s trouble and the great tribulation (Jer 30:7Mt 24:21). Many additional details are supplied in Revelation 6-19.

C. The fact that the opening section of chapter 12 is obviously eschatologically future, constitutes a major embarrassment to liberals who attempt to find Antiochus Epiphanes in 11:36-45. Chapter 12, which is naturally connected to the preceding section, clearly does not refer to Antiochus Epiphanes but to the consummation of the ages and the resurrection and reward of the saints. Nowhere does the attempt to make Daniel entirely history fail more miserably than here, as the detailed exegesis of these verses demonstrates.

III. Verse examination (Daniel 12). Ryrie Study Bible, 1986, Dr. Charles C. Ryrie, Th. M., Th. D., Ph. D., Litt. D., 1925-2016).

Daniel 12:1-13, https://www.biblegateway.com/passage/?search=Daniel+12%3A1-13&version=NASB1995

A. 12:1. “at that time.” The time of the events 11:36-45, the Great Tribulation. “such as never occurred.” Re Matt 24:21, “For then there will be a great tribulation, such as has not occurred since the beginning of the world until now, nor ever will.”

B. 12:2. The verse predicts the resurrection of the righteous dead of the OT times as well as the righteous martyrs of the Tribulation  at the second coming of Christ (Rev 20:4-6). Believers of the church age will already have been changed and raised at the Rapture. (The resurrection of the wicked does not occur at the same time, but after the Millennium; Rev 20:5.)

C. 12:3. Those “who have insight” will see through Antichrist’s deception. They will also lead others to the truth during the tribulation period.

D. 12:4. “seal up the book.” Not that its meaning was to be left unexplained but that the book was to be left intact so as to help those living in the future tribulation days. “many will go back and forth.” As the end approaches, people will travel about seeking to discover what the future holds.

E. 12:5. Likely “two angels.”

F. 12:7. The events of the Tribulation will be consummated when the “time, times, and half a time” (the last 3 1/2 years  of that seven-year period) come to a close. These last 3 1/2 years  constitute the Great Tribulation (cf. Matt 24:21).

G. 12:8. Even Daniel did not understand all these prophecies.

H. 12:11. “the abomination of desolation.” At the midpoint of the tribulation “week” Antichrist will abolish the Jewish sacrifices (9:27; Matt 24:15 ; 2  Thes 2:4). From that time to the end of the 1,290 days. Normally 3 1/2 years (of 360 days per year) would include only 1,260 days. The extra 30 days mentioned here allow for the judgments that will take place after the second coming of Christ. See at Ezek 20:33-44; Joel 3:2-3; Matt 24:32).

I. 12:12. Because the one who lives 75 days after the second advent  (1335 days from the midpoint of the Tribulation) is called blessed, this must mark the beginning of the actually functioning of Christ’s millennial kingdom.

J. 12:13. “you will enter into rest.” I.e., Daniel would die but is promised that he will rise (be resurrected) and receive his inheritance (portion) in our Lord’s millennial kingdom.

IV. Summary. Holman Christian Standard Bible. Michael Rydelnik (Th. M., D. Miss).

A. Daniel wrote his book with two purposes in mind. First, he wanted to assert that the God of Israel was sovereign, even over the powerful nations that surrounded His people. God’s chosen nation had been conquered and dispersed by a mighty empire that did not acknowledge God. What would happen now? Would Babylon’s yoke remain forever on Israel’s shoulders? Would God’s people never see their homeland again? Had God forgotten His promises? Daniel’s answer was that Babylon would fall to another empire, which in turn would fall to yet another great kingdom. History would continue in this pattern until God judged all Gentile nations and established His everlasting rule. Daniel’s message was obviously meant to uplift and encourage the weary hearts of the exiled Jews.

B. Yet Daniel also looked forward to the day when God would restore and reward Israel. Israel was suffering punishment for its disobedience; but when would the punishment end? Daniel’s message was both discouraging and encouraging. He predicted trouble ahead; Israel would suffer under Gentile powers for many years. But the encouraging news was that the time of trials would also pass away. The time was coming when God would gather His children to Him again. He would establish His messianic kingdom which would last forever. The God who directs the forces of history has not deserted His people. They must continue to trust Him. His promises of preservation and ultimate restoration are sure.

V.  My Bucket List shows the references that I consult, of theologians and printed resources, whenever I write an article that will be posted. Please go to the Pages of my site to find my Bucket List.

VI . My Websites To Follow.

https://equippingblog.wordpress.com/ Eternity

https://untotheleastofthese.home.blog/ Book Prep

https://newsandcommentary38395276.wordpress.com/ Thy Kingdom Come

The Seventieth Seven (Daniel 9:27)

I. Video. 

A. Video Title. What does Daniel 9:27 tell us about when the Messiah would come?

B. Video Data. John Ankerberg Show. Drs. John Ankerberg (M. Div., D. Min). Jimmy DeYoung (M. Div., Ph. D., 1940-2021).).

II. Introduction. The  Seventieth Seven. Dr. John F. Walvoord (A.B., M.A., Th. B., Th. M., Th. D., D.D., Litt. D., 1910-2002)

A. Daniel 9:27 (NASB). “And he will make a firm covenant with the many for one week, but in the middle of the week he will put a stop to sacrifice and grain offering; and on the wing of abominations will come one who makes desolate, even until a complete destruction, one that is decreed, is poured out on the one who makes desolate.”

B. It may be concluded that Daniel’s great prophecy of the seventy sevens comprehends the total history of Israel from the time of Nehemiah in 445 B.C. until the second coming of Jesus Christ. In the first period of seven sevens, the city and the streets are rebuilt. In the second period of sixty-two sevens which follows, the Messiah appears and is living at the conclusion of the period. In the parenthesis between the sixty-ninth seven and the seventieth seven, at least two major events take place: the cutting off of the Messiah (the death of Christ) and the destruction of Jerusalem in a.d. 70. Actually, the whole present age intervenes.

C. The final period of seven years begins with the introduction of a covenant relationship between the future “prince that shall come” and “the many,” the people of Israel. This covenant is observed for the first half of the future seven-year period; then the special liberties and protections granted Israel are taken away; and Israel becomes persecuted in their time of great tribulation. The beginning of the last three and one-half years of the seventy sevens of Daniel is marked by the desecration of the future temple, the stopping of the sacrifices, and the desolation of the Jewish religion. It is this period referred to by Christ as the great tribulation inMatthew 24:15-26.

D. The culmination of the entire prophecy of the seventy weeks is the second advent of Jesus Christ which closes the seventieth seventh of Israel as well as the times of the Gentiles pictured in Daniel’s prophecies of the four great world empires. For most of the period, the two great lines of prophecy relating to the Gentiles and Israel run concurrently, and both end with the same major event—the second advent of Jesus Christ, when oppressed Israel is delivered and the oppressor, the Gentile, is judged. With Israel today back in the land, the fulfillment of these prophecies may not be too long distant.

III. Verse examination (Daniel 9:27). Ryrie Study Bible, 1986, Dr. Charles C. Ryrie, Th. M., Th. D., Ph. D., Litt. D., 1925-2016).

A. “he.” The prince of verse 26, the Antichrist previously introduced in 7:8, 24-26, who will make a pact with “many” (of the Jewish people) at the beginning of the tribulation period. But “in the middle of the week” (i.e. 3 1/2 years later) Antichrist will break the covenant and desecrate the Temple by demanding worship of himself. (See Ryrie notes on Matt 24:15 and 2 Thes 2:4. At Christ’s second coming, Antichrist and his false prophet will be cast into the Lake of Fire [Rev 19:20]).  

B. Ryrie notes Matt 24:15, 2 Thes 2:4, Rev 19:20.

1. Matt 24:15. “Abomination Of Desolation.” This is the man of sin (2 Thes 2:4), who at this midpoint in the Tribulation breaks the covenant he made with the Jewish people at the beginning of the Tribulation (Dan 9:27 ) and demands that they, and the world, worship him. Those who resist will be persecuted, and many will be martyred; that is the reason for the urgency of the instructions in vs 16-22.

2. 2 Thes 2:4. “takes his seat in the temple of God.” At the midpoint in the tribulation period the Antichrist will desecrate the rebuilt Jewish Temple in Jerusalem by placing himself there to be worshiped (Re: Matt 24:15). This is the climax of man’s great sin of self-deification, in open defiance of God.

3. Rev 19:20. The beast and his false prophet will be the first occupants of the “lake of fire;” other unbelievers, now in hades, will join them at the end of the Millennium (20:14). 

C. Other Ryrie related notes. 

1. Matt 24:3. “The Mount of Olives,” just E of Jerusalem across the Kidron Valley. “the disciples.”  Only Peter, James, John, and Andrew (Mk 13:3). Jesus answers,”what will be the sign of Your coming.” In verses 29-31, He speaks of the signs of the end of the age in verses 4-28. Verses 4-14 list the characteristics of the first half of the tribulation period, whereas verses 15-28 deal with the second half.

2. Matt 24:16-22.. 

a. 24:16: those who are in Judea must flee to the mountains.

b. 24:18. pray that your flight will not be in the winter, or on a Sabbath.

c. 24:21. then, there will be a great tribulation, such as has not occurred since the beginning of the world until now, nor ever will. 

d. 24:22. “the elect.” Jews, Deu 7:6, 14:3; Isa 43:10;

3. God causes the Tribulation judgments to fall on the unbelievers of the earth.

a. Seal judgments. Rev 6:1; 3, 5, 7, 9, 12, 8:1.

b. Trumpet judgments. Rev 8:7-13; 9:1-21; 11:15-19.

c. Bowl judgments. Rev 16:1-21.

4. My note. Notice that the time of the Tribulation is planned by God, and carried out by Jesus, God’s angels, and agents of God. By reading of the severity of the judgments, it is easy to see that the world is not in God’s tribulation now. The Tribulation will commence only upon God’s decision.

IV. Summary. Holman Christian Standard Bible. Michael Rydelnik (Th. M., D. Miss).

A. Daniel wrote his book with two purposes in mind. First, he wanted to assert that the God of Israel was sovereign, even over the powerful nations that surrounded His people. God’s chosen nation had been conquered and dispersed by a mighty empire that did not acknowledge God. What would happen now? Would Babylon’s yoke remain forever on Israel’s shoulders? Would God’s people never see their homeland again? Had God forgotten His promises? Daniel’s answer was that Babylon would fall to another empire, which in turn would fall to yet another great kingdom. History would continue in this pattern until God judged all Gentile nations and established His everlasting rule. Daniel’s message was obviously meant to uplift and encourage the weary hearts of the exiled Jews.

B. Yet Daniel also looked forward to the day when God would restore and reward Israel. Israel was suffering punishment for its disobedience; but when would the punishment end? Daniel’s message was both discouraging and encouraging. He predicted trouble ahead; Israel would suffer under Gentile powers for many years. But the encouraging news was that the time of trials would also pass away. The time was coming when God would gather His children to Him again. He would establish His messianic kingdom which would last forever. The God who directs the forces of history has not deserted His people. They must continue to trust Him. His promises of preservation and ultimate restoration are sure.

V.  My Bucket List shows the references that I consult, of theologians and printed resources, whenever I write an article that will be posted. Please go to the Pages of my site to find my Bucket List.

VI . My Websites To Follow.

https://equippingblog.wordpress.com/ Eternity

https://untotheleastofthese.home.blog/ Book Prep

https://newsandcommentary38395276.wordpress.com/ Thy Kingdom Come

Prophesied Events After The Sixty-Ninth Seven (Daniel 9:26)

I. Video. What does Daniel tell us about the identity of “the prince who will come?”

II. Video Data. John Ankerberg Show. Dr. John Ankerberg (M. Div., D. Min.). Dr. Jimmy DeYoung (M. Div., Ph. D., 1940-2021).

III. Introduction. Prophesied Events After The sixty-ninth seven. Dr. John F. Walvoord (A.B., M.A., Th. B., Th. M., Th. D., D.D., Litt. D. 1910-2002).

A. Daniel 9:26. “And after threescore and two weeks shall Messiah be cut off, but not for himself: and the people of the prince that shall come shall destroy the city and the sanctuary; and the end thereof shall be with a flood, and unto the end of the war desolations are determined.”

B. In summarizing the period of the sixty-nine sevens, the statement is made in verse 25 that the period will be “unto the Messiah the Prince.” Most conservative expositors have interpreted this as a reference to Jesus Christ. Montgomery, however, has another explanation: “‘Messiah’ is epithet of king, of priest (cf. 2 Mac. 1:10), of prophet; and in a spiritual sense of patriarch (Ps. 105:15), and even of   Cyrus, who is ‘My Anointed,’ Is. 45:1… The second term ‘prince,’ qualifying the first, is used of various officers of rank: as a chief among officials, esp. in the temple personnel, e.g. 11:22 of the high priest, q.v.; of nobles or princes, e.g., Job 29:10, 31:37; then of royalty, appearing as an early title for the king in Israel, e.g., 1 Sa. 9:16, and also of foreign kings. Hence both terms are ambiguous, and their combination does not assist identification, for which three candidates have been proposed: Cyrus, the ‘Anointed’ of Is. 45:1; Zerubbabel, the acclaimed Messiah of the Restoration; and his contemporary, the high priest Joshua b. Josedek.”

C.  It is obvious that Montgomery is straining to prove a non-Christological interpretation. By far the majority of scholars who accept Daniel as a genuine book find the reference in verse 25 to Jesus Christ. As Young expresses it, “The old evangelical interpretation is that which alone satisfies the requirements of the case. The ‘anointed one’ is Jesus Christ, who was cut off by His death upon the Cross of Calvary.” If this interpretation of verse 25 is correct, it provides the key to verse 26 which states that after “threescore and two weeks,” that is, the 7 plus 62 sevens, or after the end of the sixty-ninth seven, the Messiah shall be “cut off.” The verb rendered “to cut off” has the meaning, “to destroy, to kill,” for example, in Genesis 9:11Deuteronomy 20:20Jeremiah 11:19Psalm 37:9.

D.  The natural interpretation of verse 26 is that it refers to the death of Jesus Christ upon the cross. As this relates to the chronology of the prophecy, it makes plain that the Messiah will be living at the end of the sixty-ninth seventh and will be cut off, or die, soon after the end of it.

E. The prominence of the Messiah in Old Testament prophecy and the mention of Him in both verses 25 and 26 make the cutting off of the Messiah one of the important events in the prophetic unfoldment of God’s plan for Israel and the world. How tragic that, when the promised King came, He was “cut off.” The adulation of the crowd at the triumphal entry and the devotion of those who had been touched by His previous ministry were all to no avail. The unbelief of Israel and the calloused indifference of religious leaders when confronted with the claims of Christ combined with the hardness of heart of Gentile rulers to make this the greatest of tragedies. Christ was indeed not only “cut off” from man and from life, but in His cry on the cross indicated that He was forsaken of God. The plaintive cry “My God, my God, why hast thou forsaken me?” reveals not only the awfulness of separation from God but points also to the answer—the redemptive purpose. Although the additional explanation but not for himself is probably best translated, “There is nothing for him,” it is nevertheless true that He died for others. Nothing that rightly belonged to Him as Messiah the Prince was given to Him at that time. He had not come into His full reward nor the exercise of His regal authority. He was the sacrificial lamb of God sent to take away the sin of the world. Outwardly it appeared that evil had triumphed.

F. Although evangelical expositors have been agreed that the reference is to Jesus Christ, a division has occurred as to whether the event here described comes in the seventieth seventh described in the next verse, or whether it occurs in an interim or parenthetical period between the sixty-ninth seventh and the seventieth seventh. Two theories have emerged, namely, the continuous fulfillment theory which holds that the seventieth seven immediately follows the sixty-ninth, and the gap or parenthesis theory which holds that there is a period of time between the sixty-ninth seven and the seventieth seven. If fulfillment is continuous, then the seventieth week is already history. If there is a gap, there is a possibility that the seventieth week is still future. On this point, a great deal of discussion has emerged.

G.  In the interpretation of this passage and the decision on the question of the continuous fulfillment versus the gap theory, the fulfillment of the prophecy again comes to our rescue. The center part of verse 26 states “the people of the prince that shall come shall destroy the city and the sanctuary.” Historically the destruction of Jerusalem occurred in a.d. 70 almost forty years after the death of Christ. Although some expositors, like Young, hold that the sacrifices are caused to cease by Christ in His death which they consider fulfilled in the middle of the last seven years, it is clear that this does not provide in any way for the fulfillment of an event thirty-eight years or more after the end of the sixty-ninth seven. Young and others who follow the continuous fulfillment theory are left without any explanation adequate for interposing an event as occurring after the sixty-ninth seven by some thirty-eight years—which, in their thinking, would actually occur after the seventieth week. In a word, their theory does not provide any normal or literal interpretation of the text and its chronology.

H. The intervention of two events after the sixty-ninth seven which in their historic fulfillment occupied almost forty years makes necessary a gap between the sixty-ninth seven and the beginning of the seventieth seven of at-least this length of time. Those referred to as “the people of the prince that shall come” are obviously the Roman people and in no sense do these people belong to Messiah the Prince. Hence it follows that there are two princes: (1) the Messiah of verses 25 and 26, and (2) “the prince that shall come” who is related to the Roman people. That a second prince is required who is Roman in character and destructive to the Jewish people is confirmed in verse 27 (see following exegesis), which the New Testament declares to be fulfilled in relation to the second coming of Christ (Mt 24:15).

I. The closing portion of verse 26, although not entirely clear, indicates that the destruction of the city will be like the destruction of a flood and that desolations are sovereignly determined along with war until the end. Because of the reference to “the end” twice in verse 26, it would be contextually possible to refer this to the end of the age and to a future destruction of Jerusalem. According to Revelation 11:2, “The holy city shall they tread under foot forty and two months “probably refers to the great tribulation just before the second advent. However, there is no complete destruction of Jerusalem at the end of the age as Zechariah 14:1-3 indicates that the city is in existence although overtaken by war at the very moment that Christ comes back in power and glory. Accordingly, it is probably better to consider all of verse 26 fulfilled historically.

J. The same expression of an overflowing flood is used to denote warlike hosts who annihilate their enemies in Daniel 11:10, 22, 26, 40 and in Isaiah 8:8. This seems to be a general reference to the fact that from the time of the destruction of the city of Jerusalem, trouble, war, and desolation will be the normal experience of the people of Israel and will end only at “the consummation” mentioned in verse 27, that is, the end of the seventieth seven. History has certainly corroborated this prophecy, for not only was Jerusalem destroyed but the entire civilization of the Jews in Israel ceased to exist soon after the end of the sixty-ninth seven, and that desolation continued until recent times. The prophesied events of verse 26, like those of verse 25, already have been fulfilled and constitute clear evidence of the accuracy of the prophetic word. The prophecy of verse 25 dealing as it does with the restoration of Jerusalem at the beginning of the seventy sevens, the sixty-two sevens which follow the first seven sevens culminate in the Messiah, and the prediction that the Messiah shall be cut off and Jerusalem destroyed gives the high points in Israel’s history and provides the key to understanding this difficult prophecy. In contrast to the rather clear fulfillment of verses 25-26, verse 27 is an enigma as far as history is concerned; and only futuristic interpretation allows any literal fulfillment.

K. The same expression of an overflowing flood is used to denote warlike hosts who annihilate their enemies in Daniel 11:10, 22, 26, 40 and in Isaiah 8:8. This seems to be a general reference to the fact that from the time of the destruction of the city of Jerusalem, trouble, war, and desolation will be the normal experience of the people of Israel and will end only at “the consummation” mentioned in verse 27, that is, the end of the seventieth seven. History has certainly corroborated this prophecy, for not only was Jerusalem destroyed but the entire civilization of the Jews in Israel ceased to exist soon after the end of the sixty-ninth seven, and that desolation continued until recent times. The prophesied events of verse 26, like those of verse 25, already have been fulfilled and constitute clear evidence of the accuracy of the prophetic word. The prophecy of verse 25 dealing as it does with the restoration of Jerusalem at the beginning of the seventy sevens, the sixty-two sevens which follow the first seven sevens culminate in the Messiah, and the prediction that the Messiah shall be cut off and Jerusalem destroyed gives the high points in Israel’s history and provides the key to understanding this difficult prophecy. In contrast to the rather clear fulfillment of verses 25-26, verse 27 is an enigma as far as history is concerned; and only futuristic interpretation allows any literal fulfillment.

L. The best explanation of the time when the sixty-nine sevens ended is that it occurred shortly before the death of Christ anticipated in Daniel 9:26 as following the sixty-ninth seven. Practically all expositors agree that the death of Christ occurred after the sixty-ninth seven.

IV. Verse examination (Daniel 9:26). Ryrie Study Bible, 1986, Dr. Charles C. Ryrie, Th. M., Th. D., Ph. D., Litt. D., 1925-2016).

A. Daniel 9:26. Certain important events to happen “after” the 62 weeks (plus the seven weeks, or a total of 69 weeks): the crucifixion of “Messiah” and the destruction of Jerusalem in A.D. 70 by the Romans, who “are the people of the prince who is to come.” Because these events were to occur after the 69 weeks had run their course, and before the seventieth week began, there must be a space of time between the conclusion of the sixty-ninth week and the beginning of the seventieth.

B. Ephesians 5:32, “This mystery is great; but I am speaking with reference to Christ and the church. ” The mystery illustrates that which exists between Christ (the bridegroom) and the Church (His bride).

C. Romans 16:25-26. 25 Now to Him who is able to establish you according to my gospel and the preaching of Jesus Christ, according to the revelation of the mystery which has been kept secret for long ages past, 26 but now is manifested, and by the Scriptures of the prophets, according to the commandment of the eternal God, has been made known to all the nations, leading to obedience of faith;

1. Mystery. A definition of a scriptural mystery: something unknown in times past (OT) but revealed in the NT. See note on Eph 3:3. Here “the mystery” is the gospel of Christ. In Eph 5:32, the “mystery” was also spoken as: “32 This mystery is great; but I am speaking with reference to Christ and the church.” OT prophecies of Messiah could now be understood, once the mystery was revealed (cf. Luke 24:44-45; 1 Peter 1:10-12);

2. My note: Mystery in this context does not relate to, e.g., a murder mystery, where the purpose of the book, or movie, “is to cause people to figure out who the murderer may be.” In sharp contrast, a scriptural mystery is one where God does not reveal the mystery (in any form, to anyone) until He decides to inform key players in the time of the NT of such a mystery, and its understanding. Such key players are the Apostles Paul and Peter.

B. The OT Jewish prophets knew nothing about the church, the time of the church, or the relationship that would exist between Messiah and the church. Simply stated, neither Daniel, nor any other Jewish prophet, knew anything about the the church, to include its time on earth, because God had not revealed to the prophets anything about the church, as is discussed in para V. C., below.

C. In addition to having no knowledge of the church, the OT Jewish prophets knew nothing about “rapture of the church” (1 Cor 15:50-54). vs 50 “flesh and blood can not inherit the kingdom of God; nor does the perishable inherit the imperishable” vs 51″ I tell you a mystery, we will not all sleep, but we will all be changed” vs 52 “in a moment, in the twinkling of an eye, at the last trumpet; for the trumpet will sound and the dead will be raised imperishable, and we will be changed.” [Ryrie note: 15:51-58. Here Paul answers the question, what happens to those who do not die? 15:51,The rapture of the church described in vs 51-58 was a “mystery” unknown in the OT, but now revealed (In the NT). “We must not all sleep.” I.e., not all die (1 Thes 4:15) Some will be alive when the Lord returns (in the air), but all will be changed. vs 53. “perishable.” that is all who are living.]

D. OT Jewish prophets knew nothing about the Church, Messiah and the church, or the rapture of the church. OT Jews knew about God being in Heaven, but not about Jews being in Heaven; (unsaved Jews do not go to Heaven). OT Jews knew only about Jews being in a physical, and earthly kingdom, where Messiah would rule and reign. OT Jews knew nothing about the Church being caught up to heaven, or the Church ruling and reigning with Christ in the earthly kingdom, after their return from Heaven with Messiah at the second coming of Messiah (Matt 24:29-30, Rev 19:11-20:4, Zech 14:1-5, 9).

E. God revealed to the OT Jewish prophets information on the last days of Israel (Isa 2:1), but not about the last days of the Church (2 Tim 3:1). The audience on the Day of Pentecost (a Jewish feast day) was Jewish; Peter spoke to those Jews about an OT prophecy about Israel (Acts 2:16-17, Joel 2:28-32). Gentiles would have known nothing about OT Jewish prophecies.

F. When the Apostles went into foreign lands (Acts 1:8), they spoke to the Gentiles and unsaved Jews about Messiah and Him crucified (Acts 2:22-28; 1 Cor 2:2; Gal 3:10-13; there is no salvation in the Law).

G. The OT Jewish prophets did not tell the OT Jews about things that were a “mystery,” which God would only reveal during the Church Age to His selected apostles.

V. Summary. Expositor’s Bible Commentary. Old Testament (Abridged Edition) Old Testament. Author,  Kenneth L. Barker (B.A., Th. M., Ph. D.).

A. The second sentence of v.26 is perhaps more accurately rendered, “The people of a prince who shall come will destroy both the city and the sanctuary.” (The reason for the ambiguity here is that the definite article is missing in front of “ruler” in the Hebrew, which would be necessary for the rendering “the people of the ruler”). Subsequent history shows this to be a clear reference to the destruction of Jerusalem by the Romans under Titus in A.D. 70, forty years after Calvary, or forty-three years after the end of the sixty-ninth “week”—if the 457 B.C. theory is correct for the commencement of the seventy weeks.

B. The next sentence or two indicate what is to happen after the destruction of Jerusalem: lit., “And the end of it will be in the overflowing, and unto the end there will be war, a strict determination of desolations” or “the determined amount of desolations.” The general tenor is in striking conformity with Christ’s own prediction (Mt 24:7-22). Notice that this entire intervening period is referred to before the final or seventieth week is mentioned in v.27. It is difficult to explain why this is so if the entire seventy weeks are intended to run consecutively and without interruption. It seems far more reasonable to infer that a long period of time of war and desolation is to intervene between the sixty-ninth week (when Messiah appears at his first advent) and the seventieth week, which is to usher in Christ’s second advent.

VI. My Bucket List shows the references that I consult, of theologians and printed resources, whenever I write an article that will be posted. Please the Pages of my site to find Bucket List.

VII . My Websites To Follow.

https://equippingblog.wordpress.com/ Eternity

https://untotheleastofthese.home.blog/ Book Prep

https://newsandcommentary38395276.wordpress.com/ Thy Kingdom Come

The Fulfillment of the Sixty-Nine Sevens (Daniel 9:25)

I. Video

What is the prophetic outline to the Book of Daniel?

II. Video Data. John Ankerberg Show. Dr. John Ankerberg (M. Div., D. Min). Dr. Jimmy DeYoung (M. Div., Ph. D., 1940-21).

III. Introduction. The Fulfillment of the Sixty-Nine Sevens. Author: Dr. John F. Walvoord (A.B., M.A., Th. B., Th. M., Th. D., D.D., Litt. D., 1910-2002).

A. Daniel 9:25. “Know therefore and understand, that from the going forth of the commandment to restore and to build Jerusalem unto the Messiah the Prince shall be seven weeks, and three score and two weeks: the street shall be built again, and the wall, even in troublous times.”

B. At the outset of the revelation of the details of the seventy sevens, Daniel is exhorted to know and understand the main facts of the prophecy (cf. Dan 9:22). 

C. The key to the interpretation of the entire passage is found in the phrase “from the going forth of the commandment to restore and to build Jerusalem.” The question of the terminus a quo, the date on which the seventy sevens begin, is obviously most important both in interpreting the prophecy and in finding suitable fulfillment. The date is identified as being the one in which a commandment to restore and to build Jerusalem is issued. The decree of Artaxerxes was  given to Nehemiah authorizing the rebuilding of the city (Neh 2:1-8, 536 B.C.). Implication has been drawn from Ezra 4:12-21 (534 B.C.) that the city walls were rebuilt at that time and that the reference to “a wall in Judah” in Ezra 9:9 (457 B.C.) signifies completion. 

D. In verse 25, Daniel is introduced to two periods of time which are immediately consecutive, first a period of seven sevens, or forty-nine years, and then a period of sixty-two sevens, or four hundred and thirty-four years. There is no indication clearly given as to the reason for distinguishing between the two periods except that he adds “the streets shall be built again, and the wall, even in troublesome times.”

E. That Sir Robert Anderson is right in building upon a 360-day year seems to be attested by the Scriptures. It is customary for the Jews to have twelve months of 360 days each and then to insert a thirteenth month occasionally when necessary to correct the calendar. The use of the 360-day year is confirmed by the forty-two months of the great tribulation (Rev 11:2; 13:5) being equated with 1,260 days (Rev 12:6; 11:3).

F. Accordingly, the best explanation of the time when the sixty-nine sevens ended is that it occurred shortly before the death of Christ anticipated in Daniel 9:26 as following the sixty-ninth seven. Practically all expositors agree that the death of Christ occurred after the sixty-ninth seven. 

G. The best end point for the sixty-nine sevens is shortly before Christ’s death anticipated in Daniel 9:26. Practically all expositors agree that the crucifixion occurred after the sixty-ninth seven. 

H. The dates of the sixty-nine weeks of Daniel 9:25 extended from the first of Nisan (March 5) 444 B.C., to the tenth of Nisan (March 30) A.D. 33.

IV. Verse examination (Daniel 9:25). Ryrie Study Bible, 1986, Dr. Charles C. Ryrie, Th. M., Th. D., Ph. D., Litt. D., 1925-2016).

The 70 sevens begin with a “decree to restore and rebuild Jerusalem,” the commandment of Artaxerxes Longimanus (Neh 2:5).  The public square and moat were rebuilt by the time the first seven weeks (49 years) were completed. 

V. Summary. Author: Expositor’s Bible Commentary. Old Testament (Abridged Edition) Old Testament. Author,  Kenneth L. Barker (B.A., Th. M., Ph. D.).

A. Verse 25 is crucial. Only sixty-nine heptads (units of seven) are listed here, broken into two segments. The first segment of seven amounts to forty-nine years, during which the city of Jerusalem is to be “rebuilt with streets and a trench, but in times of trouble.”

B. Verse 26 specifies the termination of the sixty-nine heptads: the cutting off of the Messiah. After the appearance of Messiah as Ruler—483 years after the sixty-nine weeks have begun—he will be cut off. This accords very well with a three-year ministry of the Messiah prior to his crucifixion.

VI. My Bucket List shows the references that I consult, of theologians and printed resources, whenever I write an article that will be posted. Please the Pages of my site to find Bucket List.

VII . My Websites To Follow.

https://equippingblog.wordpress.com/ Eternity

https://untotheleastofthese.home.blog/ Book Prep

https://newsandcommentary38395276.wordpress.com/ Thy Kingdom Come

The Revelation of the Seventy Sevens of Israel (Daniel 9:24).

I. Video. How does the book of Revelation fit hand in glove with the book of revelation?

II. Video Data. John Ankerberg Show. Dr. John Ankerberg (M. Div., D. Min.), Dr. Jimmy DeYoung (M. Div., Ph. D., 1940-2021).

III. Introduction. The Revelation of the Seventy Sevens of Israel. Author: Dr. John F. Walvoord (A.B., M.A., Th. B., Th. M., Th. D., D.D., Litt. D., 1910-2002).

A. Daniel 9:24. “Seventy weeks are determined upon thy people and upon thy holy city, to finish the transgression, and to make an end of sins, and to make reconciliation for iniquity, and to bring in everlasting righteousness, and to seal up the vision and prophecy, and to anoint the most Holy.”

B. In the concluding four verses of Daniel 9 one of the most important prophecies of the Old Testament is contained. The prophecy as a whole is presented in verse 24. The first sixty-nine sevens is described in verse 25. The events between the sixty-ninth seventh and the seventieth seventh are detailed in verse 26. The final period of the seventieth seventh is described in verse 27.

IV. Verse examination. Author: Ryrie Study Bible, 1986, Dr. Charles C. Ryrie, Th. M., Th. D., Ph. D., Litt. D., 1925-2016).

A. “seventy weeks.” Lit 70 sevens. Obviously years are meant, for Daniel had been thinking of the years of captivity (9:2). 490 days is 16 months, and 490 weeks is 9 1/2 years, both too short to accommodate the events  of the prophecy. Furthermore, weeks of days are so specified in 10:2-3, where the Hebrew adds “days.” 

B. This period of 490 years concerns “your people” (the Jews)

C. Your holy city “Jerusalem.” 

D. “to finish the transgression.”  To end the apostasy of the Jews.

E. “to make an end of sin.” May mean either to atone for sin or to seal up sin in the sense of judging it finally.

F. “to make atonement for iniquity.” Refers to the death of Christ on the cross, which is the basis for Israel’s future forgiveness  (Zech 12:10; Rom 11:26-27).

G. “to bring in everlasting righteousness.” In the millennial kingdom of Messiah (Jer 23:5-6).

H. “to seal up vision and prophecy.” To set God’s seal of fulfillment on all the prophecies concerning the jewish people and Jerusalem.

I. “to anoint the most holy place.” the anointing of the Holy of Holies in the millennial temple. 

V. Summary. Author: Expositor’s Bible Commentary. Old Testament (Abridged Edition) Old Testament. Author,  Kenneth L. Barker (B.A., Th. M., Ph. D.).

A. This verse sets forth the approach of “seventy `sevens'” of years during which God would accomplish his plan of national and spiritual redemption for Israel. The seventy “weeks” or “heptads” (lit., “units of seven,” whether days or years) are 490 years (divided, as we shall see, into three sections). This was the time to elapse before the accomplishment of six great achievements for the Holy City and for God’s covenant people. The first three relate to the removal of sin; the second three to the restoration of righteousness.

B. Before the question of the seventieth week can be properly handled, the terminus ad quem of the seventy weeks must first be established. If all six goals of v 24 were attained by the crucifixion of Christ and the establishment of the early church seven years after his death, then it might be fair to assume that the entire 490 years of the seventy weeks were to be understood as running consecutively and coming to a close in A.D. 37. But since all or most of the six goals seem to be yet unfulfilled, it follows that if the seventieth week finds fulfillment at all, it must be identified as the last seven years before Christ’s return to earth as millennial King.

VI. My Bucket List shows the references that I consult, of theologians and printed resources, whenever I write an article that will be posted. Please the Pages of my site to find Bucket List.

VII . My Websites To Follow.

https://equippingblog.wordpress.com/ Eternity

https://untotheleastofthese.home.blog/ Book Prep

https://newsandcommentary38395276.wordpress.com/ Thy Kingdom Come

Daniel’s Prophecy Of 70 Weeks.

I. Video. What happens during the 7 year tribulation or the 70th week of Daniel?

II. Video Data. The Tribulation or 70 week period of Daniel 9. Dr. Renald Showers, Th. M., Th., D. 1935-2019.

III. Introduction. The Book of Daniel is one of the most important books of the Bible. From Daniel’s ninth chapter prophecy in the Old Testament, you will find prophetic relevance to the following New Testament books and Chapters: Matt 5, 24; Mark 9, 13; Luke 1, 19, 21, 24; Acts 1; Revelation 19. You will find literal prophetic connection from Daniel’s Old Testament to its New Testament fulfillment. It is important for everyone to have a good understanding of the prophecy of Daniel’s 70 Weeks. By having such knowledge it will help us to provide Biblical answers to those who want to put the church in the Tribulation, which distorts scripture and frightens many people.

IV About my sources of information. Please note that my sources draw conclusions; I do not draw a conclusion, except to restate such a conclusion that has already been made by one of my references. 

V. Explanation of Daniel 9:1-2.


A. The Seventy Years of the Desolations of Jerusalem

9:1-2 In the first year of Darius the son of Ahasuerus, of the seed of the Medes, which was made king over the realm of the Chaldeans; In the first year of his reign I Daniel understood by books the number of the years, whereof the word of the Lord came to Jeremiah the prophet, that he would accomplish seventy years in the desolations of Jerusalem.

1. According to the opening verse of chapter 9, the third vision of Daniel occurred “In the first year of Darius the son of Ahasuerus, of the seed of the Medes.” In other words, the events of Belshazzar’s feast in chapter 5 occurred between the visions of chapters 8 and 9. It is not clear where chapter 6 fits into this order of events, but it also may well have occurred in the first year of the reign of Darius, either immediately before or immediately after the events of chapter 9. If Daniel’s experience at Belshazzar’s feast as well as his deliverance from the lions had already been experienced, these significant evidences of the sovereignty and power of God may well have constituted a divine preparation for the tremendous revelation now about to unfold.

2. The immediate occasion of this chapter, however, was the discovery by Daniel in the prophecy of Jeremiah that the desolations of Jerusalem would be fulfilled in seventy years. The expression by books may be understood to mean “in books.” Jeremiah the prophet, in addition to his oral prophetic announcements, had written his prophecies in the closing days of Jerusalem before its destruction at the hand of the Babylonians. Although the first record of Jeremiah had been destroyed (Jer 36:23), Jeremiah rewrote it, acting on instructions from the Lord (Jer 36:28) Jeremiah himself had been taken captive by Jews rebelling against Nebuchadnezzar and had been carried off to Egypt against his will to be buried in a strange land in a nameless grave, but the timeless Scriptures which he wrote found their way across desert and mountain to far away Babylon and fell into the hands of Daniel. How long Daniel had been in possession of these prophecies is not known, but the implication is that Daniel had now come into the full comprehension of Jeremiah’s prediction and realized that the seventy years prophesied had about run their course. The time of the vision recorded in Daniel 9 was 538 B.C., about 67 years after Jerusalem had first been captured and Daniel carried off to Babylon (605 B.C.).

3, Jeremiah had prophesied, “This whole land shall be a desolation, and an astonishment; and these nations shall serve the king of Babylon seventy years. And it shall come to pass, when seventy years are accomplished, that I will punish the king of Babylon, and that nation, saith the Lord, for their iniquity, and the land of the Chaldeans, and will make it perpetual desolations” (Jer 25:11-12). Later, Jeremiah added to this prophecy, “For thus saith the Lord, that after seventy years be accomplished at Babylon I will visit you, and perform my good word toward you, in causing you to return to this place. For I know the thoughts that I think toward you, saith the Lord, thoughts of peace, and not of evil, to give you an expected end. Then shall ye call upon me, and ye shall go and pray unto me, and I will hearken unto you. And ye shall seek me, and find me, when ye shall search for me with all your heart. And I will be found of you, saith the Lord: and I will turn away your captivity, and I will gather you from all the nations and from all the places whither I have driven you, saith the Lord; and I will bring you again into the place whence I caused you to be carried away captive”{Jer 29:10-14).

4. On the basis of these remarkable prophecies, Daniel was encouraged to pray for the restoration of Jerusalem and the regathering of the people of Israel. Daniel, although too old and probably too infirm to return to Jerusalem himself, lived long enough to see the first expedition of pilgrims return. This occurred in “the first year of Cyrus king of Persia”(Ezra 1:1), and Daniel lived at least until “the third year of Cyrus king of Persia”(Daniel 10:1) and probably some years longer.

5. As brought out in the earlier discussion of chapter 6 relative to Darius the Mede, Darius had been appointed by Cyrus as king of Babylon. The assertion of Daniel 9:1, that Darius “was made king over the realm of the Chaldeans,” indicates that he was invested with the kingship by some higher authority. This well agrees with the supposition that he Was installed as viceroy in Babylonia by Cyrus the Great. This appointment is confirmed by the verb “was made king” (Hebrew homlak) which does not seem a proper reference to Cyrus himself. In this connection, it is of interest that in the Behistun Inscription, Darius I refers to his father, Hystaspes, as having been made king in a similar way.

6. In studying Daniel 9:2 with its reference to “the desolations of Jerusalem,” Sir Robert Anderson distinguishes the duration of the captivity from the duration of the desolations of Jerusalem. Anderson states, “The failure to distinguish between the several judgments of the Servitude, the Captivity and the Desolations, is a fruitful source of error in the study of Daniel and the historical books of Scripture.”

7. Anderson goes on to explain that Israel’s servitude and captivity began much earlier than the destruction of the temple. Although Anderson’s dates are not according to current archeological findings (606 b.c. instead of 605 for the captivity, 589 b.c. instead of 586 for the desolation of the temple, and his date for the decree of Cyrus 536 B.C. instead of 538), in general, his approach to the fulfillment of Jeremiah’s prophecy is worthy of consideration. As previously discussed in the exposition of chapter 1, the captivity probably began in the fall of 605 B.C. at which time a few, such as Daniel and his companions and other of the royal children, were carried off to Babylon as hostages. The major deportation did not take place until about seven years later. According to Donald J. Wiseman, the exact date of the first major deportation was March 16, 597 b.c, after the fall of Jerusalem following a brief revolt against Babylonian rule. About 60,000 were carried away at that time.

8. Jerusalem itself was finally destroyed in 586 b.c, and this, according to Anderson, began the desolations of Jerusalem, the specific prophecy of Jeremiah 25:11, also mentioned in 2 Chronicles 36:21 and in Daniel 9:2.

9. The precise prophecy of Jeremiah 25:11-12 predicts that the king of Babylon would be punished at the end of seventy years. Jeremiah 29:10 predicted the return to the land after seventy years. For these reasons, it is doubtful whether Anderson’s evaluation of Daniel 9:2 as referring to the destruction of the temple itself is valid. The judgment on Babylon and the return to the land of course took place about twenty years before the temple itself was rebuilt and was approximately seventy years after captivity beginning in 605 b.c. Probably the best interpretation, accordingly, is to consider the expression the desolations of Jerusalem, in Daniel 9:2 , as referring to the period 605 B.C. to 539 B.C. for the judgment on Babylon, and the date of 538 b.c for the return to the land.

10. This definition of the expression the desolations of Jerusalem (Daniel 9:2) is supported by the word for “desolations” ( h£orbo‚t)which is a plural apparently including the environs of Jerusalem. The same expression is translated “all her waste places” in Isaiah 5:1-3(cf. 52:9). Actually the destruction of territory formerly under Jerusalem control even predated the 605 date for Jerusalem’s fall.

11. Although it is preferred to consider Daniel 9:2 as the period 605 b.c.-539 b.c, Anderson may be right in distinguishing as he does the period of Israel’s captivity from the period of Jerusalem’s destruction. Zechariah 1:12, referring to God’s destruction of the cities of Judah for three score years and ten, may extend to the time when the temple was rebuilt. This is brought out in Zechariah 1:16 where it is stated, “Therefore thus saith the Lord; I am returned to Jerusalem with mercies: my house shall be built in it, saith the Lord of hosts, and a line shall be stretched forth upon Jerusalem.” It is most significant that the return took place approximately seventy years after the capture of Jerusalem in 605 b.c, and the restoration of the temple (515 b.c) took place approximately seventy years after the destruction of the temple (586 b.c), the latter period being about twenty years later than the former. In both cases, however, the fulfillment does not have the meticulous accuracy of falling on the very day, as Anderson attempts to prove. It seems to be an approximate number as one would expect by a round number of seventy. Hence, the period between 605 b.c and 538 b.c would be approximately sixty-seven years; and the rededication of the temple in March of 515 b.c, would be less than seventy-one years from the destruction of the temple in August of 586 b.c

12. What is intended, accordingly, in the statement in Daniel 9:2is that Daniel realized that the time was approaching when the children of Israel could return. The seventy years of the captivity were about ended. Once the children of Israel were back in the land, they were providentially hindered in fulfilling the rebuilding of the temple until seventy years after the destruction of the temple had also elapsed.

13. Several principles emerge from Daniel’s reference to Jeremiah’s prophecy. First, Daniel took the seventy years literally and believed that there would be literal fulfillment. Even though Daniel was fully acquainted with the symbolic form of revelation which God sometimes used to portray panoramic prophetic events, his interpretation of Jeremiah was literal and he expected God to fulfill His word.

14. Second, Daniel realized that the Word of God would be fulfilled only on the basis of prayer, and this occasioned his fervent plea as recorded in this chapter. On the one hand, Daniel recognized the certainty of divine purposes and the sovereignty of God which will surely fulfill the prophetic word. On the other hand, he recognized human agency, the necessity of faith and prayer, and the urgency to respond to human responsibility as it relates to the divine program. His custom of praying three times a day with his windows open to Jerusalem still in desolation revealed his own heart for the things of God and his concern for the city of Jerusalem.

15. Third, he recognized the need for confession of sin as a prelude to restoration. With this rich background of the prophetic program revealed through Jeremiah, Daniel’s own prayer life, and his concern for the city of Jerusalem as the religious center of the nation of Israel, Daniel approaches the task of expressing his confession and intercession to the God of Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob.

16. Because Daniel, for the first time, used the word Lord or Jehovah in Daniel 9:2, repeating the expression in verses 4, 10, 13, 14, and 20, critics have used this as an argument against the authenticity of this passage and the prayer which follows.

B. Notes come from Bible.Org., Dr. John F. Walvoord (A.B., M.A., Th. B., Th.M., Th.D., D.D., Litt. D.. 1910-2002). John was a member of the Dallas Theological Seminary faculty for 50 years, from 1936 to 1986. He served as president of Dallas Seminary from 1952 to 1986, and as chancellor until 2001. He continued to teach and preach until a few weeks before his death at the age of 92.

VI. Summary. 

A. Introduction.  The “seventy weeks” prophecy is one of the most significant and detailed Messianic prophecies of the Old Testament. It is found in Daniel 9. The chapter begins with Daniel praying for Israel, acknowledging the nation’s sins against God and asking for God’s mercy. As Daniel prayed, the angel Gabriel appeared to him and gave him a vision of Israel’s future.


1. The Divisions of the 70 Weeks.


a. In verse 24, Gabriel says, “Seventy ‘sevens’ are decreed for your people and your holy city.” Almost all commentators agree that the seventy “sevens” should be understood as seventy “weeks” of years, in other words, a period of 490 years. These verses provide a sort of “clock” that gives an idea of when the Messiah would come and some of the events that would accompany His appearance.

b. The prophecy goes on to divide the 490 years into three smaller units: one of 49 years, one of 434 years, and one 7 years. The final “week” of 7 years is further divided in half. Verse 25 says, “From the time the word goes out to restore and rebuild Jerusalem until the Anointed One, the ruler, comes, there will be seven ‘sevens,’ and sixty-two ‘sevens.’” Seven “sevens” is 49 years, and sixty-two “sevens” is another 434 years:

c. 49 years + 434 years = 483 years

2. The Purpose of the 70 Weeks


a. The prophecy contains a statement concerning God’s six-fold purpose in bringing these events to pass. Verse 24 says this purpose is 1) “to finish transgression,” 2) “to put an end to sin,” 3) “to atone for wickedness,” 4) “to bring in everlasting righteousness,” 5) “to seal up vision and prophecy,” and 6) “to anoint the most holy.”

b. Notice that these results concern the total eradication of sin and the establishing of righteousness. The prophecy of the 70 weeks summarizes what happens before Jesus sets up His millennial kingdom. Of special note is the third in the list of results: “to atone for wickedness.” Jesus accomplished the atonement for sin by His death on the cross (Romans 3:25Hebrews 2:17).

3. The Fulfillment of the 70 Weeks


a. Gabriel said the prophetic clock would start at the time that a decree was issued to rebuild Jerusalem. From the date of that decree to the time of the Messiah would be 483 years. We know from history that the command to “restore and rebuild Jerusalem” was given by King Artaxerxes of Persia c. 444 B.C. (see Nehemiah 2:1-8).

b. The first unit of 49 years (seven “sevens”) covers the time that it took to rebuild Jerusalem, “with streets and a trench, but in times of trouble” (Daniel 9:25). This rebuilding is chronicled in the book of Nehemiah.

c. Converting the 360-day year used by the ancient Jews, 483 years becomes 476 years on our solar calendar. Adjusting for the switch from B.C. to A.D., 476 years after 444 B.C. places us at A.D. 33, which would coincide with Jesus’ triumphal entry into Jerusalem (Matthew 21:1–9). The prophecy in Daniel 9 specifies that, after the completion of the 483 years, “the Anointed One will be cut off” (verse 26). This was fulfilled when Jesus was crucified.

d. Daniel 9:26 continues with a prediction that, after the Messiah is killed, “the people of the ruler who will come will destroy the city and the sanctuary.” This was fulfilled with the destruction of Jerusalem in A.D. 70. The “ruler who will come” is a reference to the Antichrist, who, it seems, will have some connection with Rome, since it was the Romans who destroyed Jerusalem.

4. The Final Week of the 70 Weeks


a. Of the 70 “sevens,” 69 have been fulfilled in history. This leaves one more “seven” yet to be fulfilled. Most scholars believe that we are now living in a huge gap between the 69th week and the 70th week. The prophetic clock has been paused, as it were. The final “seven” of Daniel is what we usually call the tribulation period.

b. Daniel’s prophecy reveals some of the actions of the Antichrist, the “ruler who will come.” Verse 27 says, “He will confirm a covenant with many for one ‘seven.’” However, “in the middle of the ‘seven,’ . . . he will set up an abomination that causes desolation” in the temple. Jesus warned of this event in Matthew 24:15. After the Antichrist breaks the covenant with Israel, a time of “great tribulation” begins (Matthew 24:21, NKJV).

c. Daniel also predicts that the Antichrist will face judgment. He only rules “until the end that is decreed is poured out on him” (Daniel 9:27). God will only allow evil to go so far, and the judgment the Antichrist will face has already been planned out.

5. Conclusion


The prophecy of the 70 weeks is complex and amazingly detailed, and much has been written about it. Of course, there are various interpretations, but what we have presented here is the dispensational, premillennial view. One thing is certain: God has a time table, and He is keeping things on schedule. He knows the end from the beginning (Isaiah 46:10), and we should always be looking for the triumphant return of our Lord (Revelation 22:7).

B. Author identity.

Got Questions (dot) Org

Daniel ‘s Prophecy Of Seventy Weeks Of Years.

I. Video. Does Prophetic Information from Daniel compare to what is happening in our world today?

II. Video Data. John Ankerberg Show. Drs: John Ankerberg (M. Div., D. Min.),  Jimmy DeYoung  (M. Div., Ph. D., 1940-2021).

III. Video Context. As is discussed in the video, things are lining up in the middle east that may relate to the events of the “yet future” tribulation. However, it is important to understand that God is not an observing deity, but it is He who makes plans for the time of “eternity to eternity.” God has made a plan for the time and events of the Tribulation; they are not things “that just happen.” Everything that is discussed in the Book of Daniel, as well as the other Old Testament books of prophecy, relate to the things that God has planned for the redemption of the nation of Israel, for the saving of a multitude of  “unsaved” Jews and Gentiles during the tribulation, for Jesus to destroy all Gentile world empires so that He might rule the nations Himself (Zech 14:1-5, 9); and for the destruction of the heavens and the earth (2:Peter 3:10-12) and the creation of the new heavens and new earth (2 Peter 3:13; Revelation 21:1), with “the day of the Lord” beginning unexpectedly at the beginning of the Tribulation (“like a thief in the night” 1 Thes 5:2, Joel Introduction) and end at the conclusion of the Millennium with the destruction of the heavens and the earth (Rev 21:1); with the new Jerusalem coming down out of heaven from God made ready as a bride adorned for her husband (Rev 21:2). (These notes come from the Ryrie Study Bible, 1986, Dr. Charles C. Ryrie, Th. M., Th. D., Ph. D., Litt. D., 1925-2016).

IV. Article Introduction. This area of the Bible is one of the most important ones that discuss God’s plan for the ages. I am planning on spending enough time on this ninth chapter of Daniel that is necessary to show the love of God for His chosen people, Israel (Deu 14:2), and the measures that He takes to restore their Kingdom on earth to them (2 Sam 7:10, 12, 13, 16). In this series of articles we will also discuss the differences between “antichrists” and “the antichrist.”

V. Article Details.

A. The third vision of Daniel the prophet, following the two preceding visions of chapters 7 and 8, concerns the program of God for Israel culminating in the coming of their Messiah to the earth to reign. Although other major prophets received detailed information concerning the nations and God’s program for salvation, Daniel alone was given the comprehensive program for both the Gentiles, as revealed to Daniel in preceding chapters, and for Israel, as recorded in Daniel 9:24-27. Because of the comprehensive and structural nature of Daniel’s prophecies, both for the Gentiles and for Israel, the study of Daniel, and especially this chapter, is the key to understanding the prophetic Scriptures. Of the four major programs revealed in the Bible—for the angels, the Gentiles, Israel, and the church, Daniel had the privilege of being the channel of revelation for the second and third of these programs in the Old Testament.

B. This chapter begins with Jeremiah’s prophecy of seventy years of the desolations of Jerusalem and is advanced by the intercessory prayer of Daniel. The chapter concludes with the third vision of Daniel, given through the agency of the angel Gabriel, which provides one of the most important keys to understanding the Scriptures as a whole. In many respects, this is the high point of the book of Daniel. Although previously Gentile history and prophecy recorded in Daniel was related to the people of Israel, the ninth chapter specifically takes up prophecy as it applies to the chosen people.

VI. Notes come from Bible.Org., Dr. John F. Walvoord (A.B., M.A., Th. B., Th.M., Th.D., D.D., Litt. D.. 1910-2002). John was a member of the Dallas Theological Seminary faculty for 50 years, from 1936 to 1986. He served as president of Dallas Seminary from 1952 to 1986, and as chancellor until 2001. He continued to teach and preach until a few weeks before his death at the age of 92.

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